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Scholarship winner overcomes obstacles of Type 1 diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by C6H12O6, May 19, 2011.

  1. C6H12O6

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  2. sisterbeth43

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    I'm not sure I liked the article. It makes it sound like that it is something very unusual for a Type 1 to accomplish. Reann had a couple of different scholarships. It is very common for kids with diabetes to accomplish great things.
     
  3. C6H12O6

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    Good point. The part I don't like is that I feel it over emphasizes the nutrition and exercise component of diabetes management.

    I don't really think most kids have to drastically change their diets after a type 1 diagnosis, and I kind of find the sweet tooth comment might suggest to someone that this might be behind why she became T1. Especially given there is no effort to explain what type 1 diabetes is.
     
  4. wilf

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    I guess I have a different take on it. I like the article, and its emphasis on the importance of diet and exercise. :)

    Thanks for posting this.. :cwds:
     
  5. Mimi

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    I liked it and I have to respectfully disagree with your above statement. Nutrition and exercise is a vital component of good diabetes management. I don't see that it was over emphasized at all.

    This is just the type of young person I would love to have my daughter meet. :cwds:
     
  6. wilf

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    I just have to ask the OP, how on earth did you dig up a story from the Ancaster News?! Are you from these parts?
     
  7. C6H12O6

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    I'm from the mean streets of Dundas :eek:
     
  8. deafmack

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    Thanks for posting this. I also liked the article. I think we often forget that diet and exercise is part of a well-rounded diabetes management program even for those with type 1. This fact especially becomes even more true as a person approaches adulthood and beyond. Whether one has diabetes or not, diet and exercise should be an important part of anyone's daily health program. I am glad it was mentioned.
     
  9. ShanaB

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    I am just providing a shameless plug for the Diabetes Hope Foundation (the organization that awarded the scholarship). We have an Emma Betz scholarship fund and it was incrediably moving to present the scholarship at the same ceremony this young woman was honoured. DHF does some wonderful work -- diabetes sports camps, at risk youth retreats, interim medical supply assistance. A great organization!
     
  10. C6H12O6

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    I guess the only problem I previously noticed with the diabetes hope scholarships is that because I was dx'd at 17 after recently turning 17 the summer before I went into grade 12 (while I was working at a summer camp) I was immediately referred to an adult diabetes program when I returned home. (Initially I was hospitalized in a peds unit and got started and initiated on insulin with a ped endo.)

    When I was researching these scholarships one of the criteria was/is that you were in the process of successfully transitioned from pediatric to adult care. Which I found kind of arbitrary because I have reviewed the diabetes hope website more recently and noticed at least one recipient who was dx'd or 18. It was not really my fault that I was deemed a good candidate for the adult program at 17. In addition, back then everyone in Ontario who went on to university generally did grade 13 so I still completed 2 years of HS with D

    To add insult to injury being pushed into an adult program after being shown the ways of a peds program was not all hugs and kittens as the saying goes
     
  11. ShanaB

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    I totally hear what you are saying. My guess is if you called and spoke to someone that wouldn't have disqualified you. DHF is all about assisting with the transition. However, given your circumstance I'm sure you would have qualified because you weren't given the choice. The scholarship program is all about rewarding young adults with diabetes and encouraging them to continue taking care of their health and well being. I don't believe that being in either a peds or adult clinic is a relevent deciding factor (based on your situation).
     
  12. C6H12O6

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    I will not get into because no one on here probably cares about the great health sci debate at McMaster, but the whole bringing up health sci vs. kinesiology is kind of a loaded question for either the reporter or the girl to bring up.

    Then for him to quote her as saying "more broader horizon" seems kind of like a dig at her. I am sure word would even tell him to drop the more. So I found the whole article remarkable on 2 levels.

    People who know about Mac Health Sci know it is a program the grooms grads for acceptance to med school with a 75 percent rate. (Which is really unheard of in Canada.) Ironically the rumor in recent years has been that if you say you want to become a doctor in your supplemental app they are likely to reject your application. So it seemed strange to me that this topic popped up.
     

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