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Scared

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Rocky Mountain Mom, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. Rocky Mountain Mom

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    How can I EVER get through this FEAR? I want to...I don't want to be paralyzed with it. I HATE THIS!

    My son had two lows today, and we handled them. They are adjusting his doses, and his pancreas are, apparently, randomly kicking in. (This is supposed to be a HONEYMOON???)

    What I hate the MOST was that he got so scared, started crying, and asked, "What if I don't wake up from a low, if I am sleeping?"

    I totally reassured him that he was safe, and that the doctors, nurses, and his parents were all taking care of him. I check his sugars twice during the night. I also try to never let him see me showing anything but confidence and comfort.... So, he felt reassured, went to sleep, and I still feel like throwing up.
     
  2. bibrahim

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    you are doing the right thing. One of my strongest emotions around D was/still is at times, fear. I noticed your verse, and depending on God and others is what will help you. That and knowing that no matter how many times you have to give 15 more carbs and wait 15 more minutes, as long as the child is taking in carbs, the BS will go up. You will learn what brings the BS up faster. For us, we give 3 glucose tabs for a low, and if it is below 60, I know it will take four, below 40 I just give six right off the bat.

    Depending on how low he is dropping and wether or not he feels the low, I recommend a Dexcom sensor. You can read about them on other posts. It was a bit hard for us to get the new insurance to approve it, but I won the appeal. They are expensive (even our amount to pay), but I truly love the thing. It helps predict lows, highs, and helps cut down on the number of pokes we have a day.

    I also find that on a pump we have less crazy lows than on lantus. We waited until DD was 8 months post diagnoses because she wasn't quite ready then we pushed for it and she was sold by the time we took our pump class. Hope this helps a bit. Will keep you in my prayers.
     
  3. wilf

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    It is normal for insulin needs to drop quite sharply in the first days to week or two after diagnosis. Measure often and keep your medical team informed about what is happening, and make sure they keep adjusting dosages downwards as long as you're seeing lows.

    Good luck - things get less hectic and scary over time.. :cwds:
     
  4. Mymommymommy

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    There is nothing scarier than a low I don't think, and that will never change. But in time, as things become more "normal" for you and your son, you won't think about them constantly. I remember Presley's first really bad low that had her in a seizure and the screaming ... oh the screaming tore my heart out. But we got threw it. Your doing the best you can, and the rest will come in time.
     
  5. Heather(CA)

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    I promise you that it will get better...
     
  6. PAULEEN

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    I know it is difficult when your child is first dx'd but as the others said, it will get better. You are doing a great job! Letting your child know you will do your best to keep him safe and being strong in front of him that is what he needs right now. But if you need to go into the shower and cry, do it...it will make you feel a lot better too. Know we are all here for you and you are welcome anytime to come and vent we all understand. There are a lot of wonderful people here and they give great advice. Keep up the great job mom. You are in my prayers.
     
  7. NomadIvy

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    Have to look for Emma'sDad's post with a pix of his little girl after swimming with a rather low number on the meter - and stating the difference between the ones who have been at this longer and the ones who are new. I'll send you the link when I find it.

    Yes, as much as it seems impossible right now, things will get better. Hugs.
     
  8. Marcia

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    It gets better! Unlike another post, where those with pumps and CGMS rarely log(including me) now is the time for you to log. It will help you see trends and that will give you confidence and your endo team the info they need. I remember right after Ab was diagnosed and in a strong honeymoon, she had a big-time low while she was eating! Keep that "game face" on because your son is taking his cues from you.
     
  9. lynn

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    It gets so much better. So much less scary....

    One thing I thought of when reading your post was that when Nathan has a low he oftentimes gets VERY frightened. It seems to have more to do with the response of his body to the low (fight or flight) than the fact that he is truly afraid of the low. Maybe your son is feeling that and then all of his fears are coming out?
     
  10. shekov

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    Fear is a very normal, biological response. It's what kept our ancient ancestors aware enough to avoid being eaten by a saber toothed tiger. ;)

    You have gotten good advice. Log everything, contact your endo daily for a while to make adjustments, continue to be strong for your son, and remember to take care of yourself too.

    If you are feeling a lot of fear and stress you may want to take a long walk, call a friend that can make you laugh or take some time in a room alone to yell or cry. D brings a lot of scary emotions to the forefront and they shouldn't be ignored.
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    It's hard, but as others have said, it does get easier.

    PS
    It's such a big help to know the age of a child and how long dxd ... and if you put it in your siggy you don't have to keep typing it again and again. Otherwise, I think responses can't help but be a bit generic.
     
  12. Pauji5

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    I'm so sorry... It's SO hard in the beginning...everything is scary and hard and wrong....it does become more of your everyday life, but we're 3 1/3 years in and I still get scared...

    The thing that keeps me sane is knowledge. I've leared so much since then, and while I still get scared and frustrated, I have the knowledge (and this website!!) so I feel I can handle things.....

    Our first low was at Target and I panicked, she panicked...it didn't occur to me to just hand her a juice box right then, we went to the car....ugh!

    You're doing great! and it will get easier to handle, for both of you.:)
     
  13. Becky Stevens mom

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    Im sorry :( This is scary stuff isnt it? So much to learn and keep track of, a new way of thinking about things. And just when you think you have some of it figured out, it changes. That will slow down, the constant changes I mean, after the honeymoon period. And you will be able to feel calm and joy again. I promise you that there will be days when youll be involved in something and forget about the diabetes for awhile. It will come back in your mind and youll wonder how you could have forgotten about it. Be patient with yourself right now and as gentle as you would be with a dear friend who it going through a rough time of it.

    Ive heard that severe low blood sugars can feel like a panic attack. Ive had panic attacks in the past and they do feel awful. Assure your son that what he is feeling is normal and its his body doing what it was designed to do, to take care of him and put sugar back where his body needs it. Our bodies are wonderfully designed to take care of us and his is too. His pancreas doesnt know how to do one of its jobs now but the rest of his body does.
     
  14. dejahthoris

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    lows/honeymoon

    Carb ratio will change after diagnosis- so watch carefully howmany carsb he eats as he goes into honeymoon. My son went from 1:8 carb ratio to 1:80 and then back down to 1:15 since last Sept. Ovaltine and milk really helped during the honeymoon- it really sticks to the ribs. Clif bars are another. He would stuff his face like a pig and could go on LANTUS alone or just a unit or a half unit of Humalog and his numbers would be PERFECT. The pancreas does die off gradually, you just hae to log and watch carefully. It will stabilize eventually. Here is a link to an awesome BG log file that has a place for carbs and corrections that really helped me monitor these changes for accuracy. Logging and monitoring need to take place during this time. www.minimed.com/pdf/log_sheet.pdf
     
  15. nanhsot

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    For me knowledge is the key, the more I research and try to understand the science of it, understand the habits and future, the more in control of my own emotions I can be (I would never say the more in control of the diabetes, as that will never happen).

    The more I learn, the more I realize that while frightening things do happen, they are very rare. Our children are still much more at risk in our vehicles. Yet we let them step foot in them every day. I go to work and see the devastation that this disease does to some, and it confirms to me daily how important it is to educate my CHILD, though I do try to do it without fear (which is hard). I remind myself that action is power, and teaching my child to care for himself is key, and he really does an amazing and mature job of it.

    I can't say I am over my grief, a year later. I wish I could. I'm not sure I'll ever totally be over my grief. There are still days a year later that I cry, but now my tears are more sadness, and resignation. The fear does go away. The worry never does and the vigilance can't, but with knowledge comes strength. You're well on your way. Stay strong, you are doing a great job.
     
  16. kimmcannally

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    I found the pic of Emma with her low meter - 19!
    http://www.connectedinmotion.ca/blog/east-coast-connections/
    just scroll down the page a little bit
     
  17. nanhsot

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  18. kimmcannally

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    OOPS! LOL Didn't notice the . between the 1 and the 9 on the meter :eek:
    Yep, still pretty darn low.
     
  19. DsMom

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    Your post brought tears to my eyes.:( Please listen to everyone here when they say it will be okay and the fear will ease. I remember when a 70 on the meter would make it hard for me to breathe. Now, Daniel's been in the 40s and we're just like "get a juice box." He does, we recheck in 15 minutes, and he's good to go. I used to think 70 would put him into a seizure. Knock on wood, 2 1/2 years in--he's gotten as low as 42 and was still walking around just fine--only a little shaky. The juice box brings him right back up.

    My niece has had type 1 since she was 2 years old--she's 29 now and the mom of two beautiful young kids. She has no complications, and I don't think she's ever even lost consciousness because of a low. She's wakes herself up at night when she's low or super high. She's living a healthy, happy life--and your child will too.

    It will get better! We're all here as living proof of that. Educate yourself as best as you can--reassure your son about all the happy kids out there with Type 1 and all the successful adults (especially sports stars might impress him??). Take it slow, breathe, and know you will all get through this. Keep us posted.:cwds:
     
  20. Amy C.

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    I was just curious as to how low your son went.

    At first I was told that below 70 was low and would panic when he measured in the 60s. The important thing is to treat a low appropriately and move on.

    You can reassure your son that testing often is how you keep the sugars in range. It is perfectly normal to start going lower than desired when first diagnosed. You just eat something with carbohydrate in it and make adjustments to the insulin if this fits a pattern.

    You will always be doing these sort of adjustments -- that is how diabetes is managed. He will go a little low at first, then steady out, then start rising as his insulin needs increase.
     

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