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Ralph Moody diabetes?

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Cate, Feb 15, 2011.

  1. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Assuming she never meets, or perhaps already knows, a real, live homosexual person. ;)
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    I think you're making an awfully big assumption about public education and parents who send their kids to public school.
     
  3. monkeyschool

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    Not making a big assumption. I am applying this specificaly to my local area. My kids were at ps before I pulled them. This was a big part of the reason I pulled them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2011
  4. monkeyschool

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    Sadly that is the truth. In this area parents are more interested in the athletics and social aspect than they are in education and spending the time.

    We can equate it to diabetes in a way. Some people will go above and beyond while other are happy to just do what the cookbook says. By me the just letting the system take care of them is the norm (there are many exceptions).
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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  6. danismom79

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    Looks good to me. :confused: I'm going to print it, thanks.

    Of course, I can't pick out any specific discussion topics from a 2-sentence summary. Which ones did you find to be "unwholesome?"
     
  7. monkeyschool

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    Wow. You guys are ruthless with me today. I feel like I am back at day 1. I did not say these were unwholesome. I said the Ralph Moody ones were wholesome. And I said that most of the ones on the list I did not feel should be read without discussion. Not that they shouldn't be read at all. Parents here work multiple jobs and rarely see their kids, I can guarantee that a good majority in my area don't even check their kids homework. I don't think any on this list are any more appropriate than Ralph Moody would be and I was simply stating that to the post stating the poster not sure 'why' we would want to expose our children to Ralph Moody. I am in no way trying to be controversial with anyone's beliefs or reading choices. I am simply stating that what is 'approved' ps reading material is no better, and perhaps is worse at various levels. This is my personal opinion, like I said we read them a from a historical spin.

    My personal issue with this list and many of the others if you are serious about wanting to know is that I don't feel I need to expose my daughter to some of the topics as early as 6th grade (mine is a year younger than most at her grade), and most certainly not as school reading without adult discussion which does not happen in a classroom. But this again is just me and my parenting style. Not saying that anyone else is in the wrong...it is just the way I grew up and the way I prefer it for my children.

    Hope that clears it up. Feel free to PM me if you want to discuss further. I don't mind explaining my choices further if you are seriously curious. I am bad at interpreting tone in posts so if you are being sarcastic please excuse the offense. That is not my intent in not liking the schools reading choices, I am defending Ralph Moody instead.
     
  8. monkeyschool

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    Just because it is a Homeschool review doesn't automatically make it approved for my family, if that's what you are implying. I am not comparing PS to HS here....simply saying that I can make the choices appropriate for my family...Ralph Moody is in, something like this is out, whether PS or HS...that book would not be one of mY choices. Again, my personal choice.
     
  9. danismom79

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    Ruthless? Hardly.

    I wasn't asking about your choices specifically. You said the list was "enlightening" and you object to some of the topics at this age. My daughter is also 12, and I haven't read any of these books. We do have the one called Biloxi something (about the slave boy), but she hasn't read it. I was hoping you would at least expound on your previous statements because I don't have the first-hand knowledge of these books that you obviously have. I only know what's summarized on the list.

    My daughter is in an awesome school system, 6th grade. They are currently reading "Three Cups of Tea" and have a discussion after every couple of chapters. I'm also reading along with her (my own copy; they are using a student edition).
     
  10. monkeyschool

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    I'll try to write in some detail after dinner (we just got home from DD's dance), but it isn't each individual book, per se (although there are some poor choices in this particular list for this age group imho), it's more the theme around the school system (and this may not be true for different areas). Where we are the theme is always about someone feeling depressed, inferior, hurt, offended, unloved, or someone dealing with a problem s.a. divorce, abuse, drugs, racism, etc. I acknowledge the fact that these problems exist, but in the lists in my area they are the common theme for all reading for this age group. I personally don't think it is healthy. In my situation I have a 12 yo who turns 13 just before cutoff. She is usually the youngest by a stretch, and she is also a tiny one, nowhere close to puberty yet. DD also reads at a more advance grade, so weeding becomes necessary.

    It's good to see you have a good school system by you. I find ours to be lacking (the one we are by now is decent, the one we belonged to before we move prompted me to HS)......DD read Three Cups of Tea shortly after it came one (the full version).....For us, even if it is an 'adult' book and I read it and can talk to her about it, it is accepted in our list, particularly if she has an interest in reading a certain book. I don't censor on 'content' here unless it is adult (explicit) content, but I try to make the reading selections a healthy pool...meaning a broad selection so that it can paint a big picture (ie. I won't object to books on the list just because they are on the list, if I can include other books along with them that provide a fuller picture. I will also try to read, or at least skim any books that have a questionable description that I am not familiar with). For example, everyone (DD's friends and kids she is doing activities with) here was reading the Eclipse series....my DD wanted to read them and did except for the last one since I didn't not feel she was ready for that one yet. For those types of series I let them go on interest rather than including them as schooling choices.....

    I have to cut short....will try to pick up after dinner.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2011
  11. monkeyschool

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    .....when DD was in 2nd grade the reading list was terrible. We lived in a town where it was all about 'social' in lower grades and 'athletics' in the upper grades. Most kids were raised by nannies rather than their parents. My DD was expected to watch Zack and Codie (sp?) for homework so that the kids could have something in common to speak about in class. The show was on Wed evenings, and we did not have time to watch it. DD actually got in trouble for not watching TV. That was the last year she spent in school...at that time most of the reading books were based around Judy Bloome or Junie B....not genius choices already. We tended to pick the first set, but only did the required amount and hit the library for extras.

    By the time DD was in 5th we moved to a different town. One that is a better fit for our family, but one in which many people have to work multiple jobs...so not by choice (as in town #1) many don't spend enough time with their kids school activities. Here we find the reading lists (which I review because DD wants to go to ps for high school) all revolve around a common theme as I mentioned earlier. My biggest problem is that you HAVE to pick a certain number of books from this list, others are not acceptable substitutes. While some of the choices are acceptable without question, others I find need good discussion, which oftentimes, for one reason or another, does not happen.

    Right now we are going through Mossflower books as non-school reading....we tend to go through series rather than individual books, finish a series, then hit individual books or another series....sometimes if DD likes an author she will pick different books from the same author.

    For school we just finished A Separate Peace (yep - lots of discussion on that one), and the Yearling, and prior to that one Uncle Tom's Cabin.....this last one is no longer a school approved reading book, btw. But again, we took the historical perspective, a picture in time, and went from there. Our latest romance/tragedy was Romeo and Juliet, picked from a list, which prompted us to go see the local college play, and even my 7yo got into the acting of some of the lines. My DD reads in her spare time which is practically anytime, anywhere - we go through A LOT of books at our house...my shelves are overflowing, and three of us have a Kindle.

    My 7yo has read almost all Beverly Cleary books this year as well as the 2nd (intermediate and advance), and 3rd grade Sonlight reading lists....plus about 50 books on how to build things and how things work. The ones he founds the funniest are the ones that mention farting at which point he breaks with uncontrollable laughter and we all have to halt activities until he can piece enough words together to tell us what is going on. He's 7 and a boy :) In PS he would be a first grader as contrary to my DD he just misses the cutoff....but he loves to read (I can't say the same for math)

    My main thing with reading is that I don't believe in limiting kids to a 'list', particularly one that is thematic in a not-so-positive way. My secondary thing is that the content where above their heads or where it has the potential to paint an incomplete picture is discussed and understood for what it is. And my third concern in selection is adult content maturity. If a book can be addressed somehow in all three options then it becomes approved reading for us. Most of the books in a series will follow suit to the first couple so I find I don't need to read them all, as long as I don't find 'flags' about any that prompt me to investigate each one a little further (s.a. the Eclipse series).

    A lot of times reviews on sites like Amazon will let you know what other kids/parents think of the books. I find a lot of schools choose the same handful of books, and some extras. If you look for the ones with a lot of 'required summer reading reviews' you can probably get a decent picture of what to expect in the book. As with everything use your own discretion in reading the reviews...a lot of times someone may state something is offensive simply because it may use a curse word or say something that particular person doesn't agree with (kind of like me with these reading lists....just because I say it, it doesn't mean they are bad....they are just not good as they are for my individual preferences). HTH
     
  12. StillMamamia

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    "A Separate Peace" and "Peace Returns". Loved those books.
     
  13. danismom79

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    I think I'm getting a better picture of where you live now.

    I don't think my daughter's town (not the one we live in, she gets bused an hour away) put out a mandatory summer reading list, and even if they did, there's no reason she can't read other books not on the list. But since she's in middle school now, they have 5 or 6 books to read in English. The student editions seem to take out profanity, and any explicit descriptions of sex or drug use, but they don't really change the content. And Three Cups of Tea includes a glossary. It's not a dumbed down version at all.

    I guess I'll hit Amazon to see what others think about the books on the list you linked to. Like I said, my daughter is 12, so she knows things like divorce, sex, homosexuality, depression, etc. exist. They may not be a part of her immediate world, but she goes to school with so many kids, and someone is bound to be experiencing things she's not. I've never seen a "theme" of depression, racism, etc., but they certainly discuss these things. Not with the aim of making the kids depressed racists, mind you, but kids will usually encounter these issues, and I think it's good to get them out on the table for age-appropriate discussions. But again, her school is awesome. And thankfully I only have to work 1 job, so I can go over what she's learned in school each day with her.
     
  14. hawkeyegirl

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    My parents didn't really monitor what I was reading at all. Those Jackie Collins books made me the hit of 6th grade slumber parties.
     
  15. monkeyschool

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    Every book has a target audience I guess, lol
     
  16. Brenda

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    I posted links in the same thread several days ago and see that the thread has gone a bit off its original intention. Oh well, Ralph's books are probably fine, just that the diabetes info in them is very dated. I posted links to other books about the early days of insulin.

    Just wanted to point out, in case you missed it a couple of weeks ago, but there are now news reports that Greg Mortenson of "Three Cups of Tea" may not have been entirely honest in his telling of his story. See http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/04/15/60minutes/main20054397.shtml for related information. I haven't read the book.

    Just finished "The Catcher in the Rye" and understand why people would be upset with the book because the main character is not exactly someone you'd want your teens hanging out with. Few obscenities near the end of the book, too. Anyway, I am trying to figure out why it is considered a great book.
     
  17. monkeyschool

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    Interesting link. I had no idea there was controversy over this one :-(

    Catcher in the Rye is one of the ones that was required for me in High School....at the time it was way over my head...as was Animal Farm (another requirement). I did reports on both and remember getting good grades even though I didn't know what the books were about. I've re-read Catcher in the Rye since, but haven't re-read Animal Farm. To Kill a Mockingbird, and A Separate Peace were also required backt then for my class.
     
  18. danismom79

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    My daughter's English class watched the 60 Minutes episode and read a couple of articles about that. They're currently reading the book for class.
     

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