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Ralph Moody diabetes?

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Cate, Feb 15, 2011.

  1. Cate

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    Has anyone read the Ralph Moody books? They are great family reading..we read them for homeschooling.
    I was looking at his biography and it briefly mentions that he was diagnosed with diabetes in his twenties after getting rejected for the military. Possibly around the 1930s. I think it is addressed in the "Shaking the Nickel Bush" book. We haven't read that one yet.
    May be interesting to learn more....I think he was put on a really strict diet.
     
  2. Cate

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    Sorry I put this thread in the wrong area...

    If you look up the "Shaking the Nickel Bush" book on Amazon you can read the first few pages. It talks about his diagnosis. They had him eating gluten bread, vegetables, nuts, etc. I am curious on why they wanted gluten bread?

    Ralph Moody lived from 1898-1982 so his diagnosis would have been closer to 1918.
     
  3. StageMom

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    Who is Ralph Moody? You can PM me. We also homeschool. My son is nine and was diagnosed with T1 three months ago. Hope to hear from you. I am always interested in learning about a good read.

    Janet
     
  4. dejahthoris

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    Is there a homeschoolers of t1's anywhere? My son was dx aug 2010- pulled him out of school tuesday.
     
  5. CheriMomTo8

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    Well if he was dxd in 1918, that was before insulin. He must have been on a starvation kind of diet. I never knew he had type 1. I'll have to look for that book.
     
  6. Cate

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    It seems like type 1 since he had lost so much weight. One reviewer on Amazon commented that this book in the series might not be as suited for children because he is a young adult now and may get into some shady dealings as he tries to make a living. Just to give you a heads up.

    I have been buying the books one by one and sending them to my dad as gifts. He then sends them back to us to read! We only have the first four so far. My dad also really liked his book about Seabiscuit.

    My boys, husband included, enjoy the authentic cowboy stuff. Ralph Moody was a tough little guy. A lot of responsibility at eight years old.
     
  7. homespunkids

    homespunkids New Member

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    Ralph Moody diabetes

    Yes, Ralph was put on a strict diet of gluten bread and cabbage. I would like to know more about the gluten bread recipe. Here are some quotes from the book where they discuss the new dx of diabetes for Ralph. Keeping in mind that the year is 1919, and insulin is 2 years away from being discovered, I found the following quotes from the book (concerning Ralph's diagnosis & diet) interesting.

    "Son," [Dr. Gaghen] said, "you know me and you know I don't shilly-shally around. You've got diabetes, and when a lad of under twenty years gets diabetes he's in a bad way. These specialist think you can't make it for more than six months, but I don't hold with their notion. There's few things that God's good sunshine and fresh air - with a bit of common sense thrown in - won't cure for a lad. Why don't you go... to Arizona where 'tis warm weather all the winter long? Wear as little clothes as the law allows and let the sunshine at your body; there's no end to the wonders it works.... I'll write out a diet for you to follow. 'Twon't be tasty, but what's the odds if it does the trick?...

    "My mouth went as dry as dust when Dr. Gaghan told me what the specialists thought, but before he was done talking I was alright again... Dr. Gaghan thought I could make it, and I had more trust in him than in all the specialist in the world.

    "Dr. Gaghan [told] me that fear and worry are the very worst things for diabetes... that must eat nothing that is either sweet or starchy. But may have any sort of leafy green vegetables, fish, chicken, milk, eggs, and tea or coffee without sugar. No red meat, and nothing fried. But stewed or fricasseed or roasted chicken is very nice.... Broiled trout are marvelous, and they're almost as good poached as fried. [I could] have almost any kind of nuts... [which] should help a lot, for nuts are very nourishing -- and easy for one to carry in his pocket."

    To those wondering if they should read Ralph Moody's books to their children; we began reading Little Britches books to our boys when they were 8 & 11 years old. We read all 8 in We loved them so much we bought all the books on CD (narrated by Cameron Beierle) and my boys have listened and re-listened to those stories a dozen times. There is some swearing in the first book but I wouldn't let that stop you from reading the books to your children (edit as you read to them). These books are full of lessons about true character.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2011
  8. somanybakers

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    What a great find. I started to read this series to my boys years ago and this inspires me to do so again. What book are the quotes from? Sounds like an autobiography of some kind, maybe? I had no idea Ralph Moody was diabetic. Funny that the Dr. says to get out and take off his shirt and let the sun soak in when many people talk about a possible link between diabetes and vitamin D. Very interesting on many levels!:)
     
  9. homespunkids

    homespunkids New Member

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    Ralph Moody diabetes

    Ralph is diagnosed with diabetes in the book "Shaking the Nickel Bush" and I took the quotes from that book. There are 8 books in the series and my suggestion is to read them in the following order, since they tell the story of Ralph Moody's life chronologically.

    1. Little Britches
    2. Man of the Family
    3. The Home Ranch
    4. Mary Emma & Company
    5. The Fields of Home
    6. Shaking the Nickel Bush
    7. The Dry Divide
    8. Horse of a Different Color

    If you prefer audio versions of the books, all of these books are available on our digital library system (Phoenix) & it's likely your digital library will have the same books. I can even burn CDs from ours. FYI - Cameron Beierle, the narrator/performer, narrates these masterfully.
     
  10. Brenda

    Brenda Junior Member

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    I will ask Jeff to consider creating a forum for Homeschoolers. I didn't see one in the list. There is a mailing list for Homeschoolers: http://lists.childrenwithdiabetes.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/Homeschooled

    to sign up.

    As for Ralph Moody, I have never heard of him. If you are interested in reading about diabetes in the "early days of insulin," such as when Ralph was diagnosed, there are several books to consider:

    Breakthrough: Elizabeth Hughes, the Discovery of Insulin, and the Making of a Medical Miracle by Thea Cooper and Arthur Ainsberg. Published by St. Martin's Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-312-64870-1. Hardcover, 306 pages. US$24.99.

    The Discovery of Insulin by Michael Bliss. Published by University of Chicago Press, 1982. ISBN 0-226-05898-0. US$18

    and The Fight to Survive: A young girl, diabetes and the discovery of insulin by Caroline Cox (I need to finish this one!)

    Available through Amazon.com
     
  11. monkeyschool

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    We homeschool as well.
     
  12. Christopher

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    I have not read the books, but judging from these quotes, I am trying to understand why they would be good to read to a child with diabetes in 2011 :confused:
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  13. monkeyschool

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    I think they are great from a historical perspective.
     
  14. Christopher

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    I understand that, and there are many other great books that do that. But I was more curious about the diabetes aspect, which is what was highlighted in this thread. From the quotes I saw, it does not look like it is something that would be good for a child.
     
  15. Cate

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    The books were introduced as great family reading.
    My son has not been diagnosed so I can't relate that way.
    But Ralph Moody was an amazing young man! Very gifted in many ways. He also had an incredible, gifted father. So, I highly recommend these books...especially for young, adventurous boys. Exercise, hard work and an enthusiastic attitude are great for everyone!
     
  16. Cate

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    Another thought I had was that some kids might look to him as a role model. I guess that is up to every parent's discretion.

    Does anyone know how his treatment evolved in later years? My family is still on "Fields of Home".

    My husband got sick a few weeks ago and he sneaked the books we had and read them by himself! We were supposed to be reading them as a family :) So they do entertain a wide range of ages.
     
  17. monkeyschool

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    Good point. I don't see it that way when I go though these types of books. To me this question is almost like asking why we read Anne Frank for instance. These are the types of books that encourage discussion with our kids...homeschoolers may be a different breed, lol but that is actually what we like.

    To take that even further I would question ALL the books being read in the public schools. I don't think there is a single book in the reading list that isn't about divorce, racism, homosexuality, a social disorder, rape, etc....they are definitely not books that I consider all children should be exposed to without discussion - which is what happens with these lists...will my child only learn about homosexuality for instance from a single book and make that her bible on the subject? KWIM?

    These books are more 'wholesome' for one and it so happens that they learn how someone dx with T1D managed it in the days before insulin, and what was believed back then. Are they a textbook on the subject? Absolutely not. They are what Anne Frank would be to a history lesson or history textbook, an account of someone that's been there....and a book that would be used in a classroom as a discussion prompting book, not like the others on a 'reading list'

    If you haven't looked at a school book list, I encourage you to do so, it is highly enlightening. Here's one local to my area:
    http://www.kinnelonpublicschools.org/PRM/academic/summer_reading_lists/summer_6.pdf
     
  18. Christopher

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    Traditionally educated children like discussion too. :cwds:


    I think it is the responsibility of the parent to be involved with their child's education, talk to them about what books they will be reading over the summer, and then have some discussions with them after they read the books.
     
  19. monkeyschool

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    I agree, but the problem is that the books are not for class discussion. Most kids in my area read the books on their own, write a report, and that's the end of it. In many of the popular titles you can pick the good, the bad, and the ugly. The average parent (in my area at least) does not get involved with their children's reading.


    Yes, my point exactly. That's what we try to do with the Ralph Moody books.
     
  20. Christopher

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    I don't know where your area is but that is just very unfortunate and sad. Then I guess they really have no one to blame but themselves.
     

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