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Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by gandgsmom, Dec 21, 2010.

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  1. gandgsmom

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    wanted to thank those of you who see it as proactive...I know I'm doing what is best for my daughter...and although she was reluctant 2 years ago (and for the record we only started testing her 2 x a day since this past August) before it was only when symptomatic, she actually does her own finger sticks and has no problem with them...even asks sometimes to do them when she feels off...I know I'm doing what is necessary for my daughter....I would be doing the wrong thing if I ignored this and let it just happen....that would be neglect in my eyes.

    RCJ and those of you who gave positive feedback I appreciate your input...however I don't feel that this forum is understanding enough to listen to someone who doesn't fit the "norm" of diabetes...It's a shame because I have a wealth of knowledge to share as well and would be glad to.
     
  2. Rcj176

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    It could be for some. I was dx'd in 1996 with a 4.8%...my kids were 5.1%, 5.2% and 5.5% They don't just look at the number anymore. They take more in to consideration. And I think that early detection is the key. Since we were caught early there wasn't room for numbers in the 600s and to stay high to produce the higher A1c numbers that most see.
     
  3. wilf

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    At 4.8% (which is a below-average A1C) that was one mighty early detection..
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'll live.
     
  5. wilf

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    It's all about gleaning what is useful from the spectrum of opinions that you get in response to posts. If you can't handle some harsh comments now and then, then I would agree this is not the place for you.

    We are all stressed by lack of sleep, lack of time, lack of resources, and worry about our childrens' short- and long-term health. That stress is reflected in the comments that get posted.

    There are a very few saints who are always positive - I'm certainly not one of that number. If you're simply looking for polite and supportive posts on an issue, then the only way to be halfway sure of getting them is to state that up front.

    I'm always looking for peoples' honest and unvarnished opinions, because for me at least that's where I learn the most.. :cwds:
     
  6. ehacker

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    normally i stay out of these "debates" but... noone here is saying that you are "wrong" to check her numbers but with the information you have told us it does seem over zelouse to have a child be subjected to finger pricks every day. then again we are not in your shoes and so we cannot say your right or wrong. from everything i have read on this post on what your daughters numbers are i personally would not be checking her numbers every day but i would be watching very closely. but you also need to realize that we are all dealing with children who have no other choice. right now and possibly for years your daughter doesnt have to constantly do everything in her life with her thought revolving around "how is this going to effect my D" just bc she is pre-D does not mean she will devolp D now or even 10-20 years from now, yes it is more likely that she will then some other children but it is not a dx of D. NOONE on this board has attacked you or been mean in any way but I see alot of confusion in what it is your looking for. I dont trully understand what your looking for. all i can say is that this "family" that i have found on CWD has been a lifesaver for me since my DS was dx last year and ecspecially over the past 5 months when things have become more diffucult. Just because you do not like the response you get or the fact that you feel we should be more supportive does not understand. there is NO NORM for D! i do feel for you and your family and i hope that your daughter never develops D, but I wish i had the chance to not have to prick my 3 year olds finger everyday, to allow him to not have to worry how everything he does will effect his health.... good luck.
     
  7. Becky Stevens mom

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    Laura, there is a family in my town who has 2 children with what the Mom claims is insulin dept diabetes. Both of her boys are of average weight and build and both get only a small amount of lantus each day and only test I believe once a day. I think that they both may have Type 1B but am not sure of this. Type 1B is also known as Idiopathic diabetes or diabetes of no known cause. Here is some info about it:

    Type 1 B diabetes is also referred to as idiopathic diabetes, or diabetes of unknown origin. This form of type 1 diabetes is not autoimmune in nature, and tests for islet cell antibodies will come up negative. People with type 1 B have an insulin deficiency and can experience ketoacidosis (a high blood sugar emergency), but their need for insulin injections typically waxes and wanes over time. Patients of African, Hispanic, or Asian descent are more likely to develop type 1 B diabetes.

    One of the differences between diabetes type 1A and type 1B is in the mechanism involved in the destruction of beta cells in the pancreas. In type 1A, an autoimmune process destroys the beta cells. This means that the body's defenses mistake the beta cells as foreign to the body, destroying them. The mechanism for cell destruction in type 1B is unknown, but is thought to involve certain genetic markers.



    Another difference between the types is the need for insulin. Patients with diabetes type 1A have an absolute insulin deficiency, meaning that they need pharmacological insulin all the time, for the rest of their lives. Patients with type 1B have varying degrees of need for insulin, and their need for insulin injections comes and goes.

    Identification
    The diagnosis of both types is also different. There are specific blood markers that define diabetes type 1A. These include autoantibodies against islet cells (the cells that make insulin). These are the proteins the body uses to destroy these cells, and their presence in the bloodstream established the diagnosis of type 1A. There are no tests for type 1B diabetes, but there are genetic markers that can suggest a predisposition to diabetes.


    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/30573-diabetes-type-1a-vs.-type/#ixzz18nsYY8df

    Im not sure if any of this helps or not but thought it might be something you could discuss with your daughter's doctor
     
  8. gandgsmom

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    thank you Becky...
     
  9. VinceysMom

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    Our story is such that my son's glucose intolerance was caught by my own T1sister months before his "official" diagnosis. July '09 we were at his well check apptmt and glucose was found in urine and finger stick was 175. Aug '09 - 2 days later from well check - we were at ped endo. We were directed to finger stick a few times a day and not every day. Long story short, (full story in diagnosis story thread) he went full blown over 200 four months later. But, we were directed to do finger pokes prior to official diagnosis.

    Good luck.

    Kathy
     
  10. gandgsmom

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    thanks for your input Kathy
     
  11. Rcj176

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    I remember an old old post of Ellen's that talked about his type 1B...thanks for the suggestion!
     
  12. Lee

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  13. Rcj176

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    Hey Kathy were his finger pokes always in normal range?
     
  14. Rcj176

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  15. Rcj176

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    I guess so! I was at urgent care clinic for an illness and they did a urine test on me and it was flagged for glucose. I was sent to an endo a week later. I didn't feel bad or anything.
     
  16. sisterbeth43

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    I have no idea what you are going thru as my DD was not ever dx'd with prediabetes. When she was dx'd, she was 600 miles away from home (without her parents), in a coma and in severe DKA. The endo told us we were just hours away from losing her. I did check my younger one (12 at the time) occasionally if she was having any symptoms, but she never tested over 95. And it was very occasionally that I did test her. I honestly don't know what I would do in your situation.
     
  17. Lucky 868

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    I, too, have no experience with pre-diabetes. My son was diagnosed by his pediatrician and we were immediately sent to Children's Hospital where it was "official" and stayed for 2 days. His number was 868, yet he was fine - no one could believe he wasn't in DKA. His diagnosis was a complete shock to us as we have no family history of D. It scares me to think what might have happened had we waited even another couple of days to see the ped. He might have gone into DKA at a baseball tournament out of town without my husband or I there. To think I might have gotten a call from the coach that he was in an ambulance scares me terribly and I'm grateful to have missed that experience.

    Good for you for being pro-active in your daughter's care. You'll be lucky and not have some of the scary diagnosis stories so many on this board have. The only person whose advice you need to follow is your ped endo. Glad you have access to a good one you can work with. None of us can say we'd do anything different than you're doing if we were in your shoes. If it's possible for your daughter not to develop D, I hope she doesn't. If it is inevitable, I hope it is years away.

    Cyndy
    Mom to N, 17, dx last April
     
  18. gandgsmom

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    Cyndy thank you.....
     
  19. Kaylas mom

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    Kayla was originally dx with impared glucose tolerance on April 15 when her first A1c came back 6.3. We were told to check after meals every other day for a month and get back to the dr.. a GP. That lasted all of 3 days and I started freaking because the numbers were in the low 200's. I couldn't get a response from the GP so I call a ped endo and they wanted to see her the next day. That day we went and were told she will have t1 eventually but it could be the next day, next month or next year. We were told to test 10 times a day, she had all the blood work done and email her numbers every 2 days. In 2 days I emailed her numbers and they called to admit her to start insulin. With her official dx date of April 24th.
     
  20. gandgsmom

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    Kayla...thank you for sharing your story....it appears that our daughters are somewhat similar...
     
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