- advertisement -

Question about honeymoon

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Andy'sMom, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. Andy'sMom

    Andy'sMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Messages:
    295
    Hi everyone -

    Does anyone really understand the "honeymoon" phase? I know I need to ask our Endo about this, but wanted to get opinions here. I know you can use the calculation of TDD/wt in kg and if you're around .5 or less, you're supposedly in the honeymoon and if you're closer to 1.0, you're out. Andy was diagnosed 4 years ago and using the above calculation (for today's insulin), I get .6. Does this mean his body is still producing some insulin? Why would this be the case 4 years later? Usually on the weekends, he eats more carbs for breakfast so the calculation comes out to .7. I honestly don't know what this means in terms of his body's ability to produce insulin? Seems he still produces some (and I'm sure if that's true, the amount varies) but not sure when to expect it to stop altogether. Why hasn't it already? Or, since we are 4 years into this disease, are we out of the honeymoon even with .6 - .7? Thought I'd see if anyone had a similar experience or if anyone has any ideas about this? Thanks!
     
  2. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    My interpretation of what you've posted is that he's out of the honeymoon, but still producing insulin..

    If he has pretty good numbers, this could keep going for quite a while. :cwds:
     
  3. saxmaniac

    saxmaniac Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,057
    "Honeymoon" isn't really a single point in time where one day you are, and one day you aren't. The total insulin production changes as the beta cells are systematically destroyed. Look at Hanas' curve, and how it dips well below 0.5. So, the 0.5 is a rough guideline.

    Personally, I say 0.5 is definitely honeymoon - when Alex was dx'd he was 0.5, but the BG's were so much easier to control because the pancreas was still working and doing most of the fine-tuning. When we started pumping it jumped right up to 1.0 and that was a rude awakening.
     
  4. Andy'sMom

    Andy'sMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Messages:
    295
    Thanks - very helpful! I didn't realize that you could be out of the honeymoon, but still producing insulin. In 4 years, our Endo has never mentioned his c-peptide levels and I will ask about that. Also, would love to know how and why he still produces insulin (probably no answer for that). :cwds:
     
  5. czardoust

    czardoust Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,178
    actually there is. Scientists now know that a T1D never stops producing insulin. What goes screwy is something that happens where the islets join the pancreas. the insulin is made in the islets, but when it arrives in the pancreas (whose job it is to distribute the insulin hormone to the blood cells as the blood exits the pancreas) the insulin isnt allowed inside the blood cell, so it gets reabsorbed into the body, never used, simply mutating into "dead energy" and becoming food for more tissue replacement- old unused hormone decomposes and then becomes recycled into, once again, unused hormone. But never does it become unusable hormone. Science is trying to "fix" the miscommunication that is in the pancreas so that the insulin hormone that is made every day of a T1D's life can be used. Dr. Faustman (who we go to see in 32 days) has already cured the T1D mice in her lab, by targeting the virus that she found attacking the pancreas with BCG (TB vaccine that is currently used to attack and stop cancer). T1 is autoimmune, like cancer. The honeymoon period depends on the number of beta cells a person still has that were undamaged prior to dx. The earlier the T1 is dx'ed, the less damaged cells there are. How high was your childs A1c at dx? Was he or she already in DKA at dx? T1 is an ugly disease that can hide for months prior to the child appearing sick. Just think how lucky we are as parents, because somehow we caught it in time. Some people are dx'ed very early on, my own mother (having an intuitive mother of her own who already had one child with "juvenile diabetes" dx'ed in the 1940's) was dx'ed in the mid 1950's, and at the time of dx, her BS was only 168. To me, thats unheard of. Katerina was 589 at dx, with an A1c of 13.0 in DKA. Moms only symptom was constant urination/being thirsty. Mom had a honeymoon period, according to what she tells me she didnt need a hefty amount of regular or NPH insulin until she was about 13 yrs old, and all her life she has been able to maintain a great physical state of health (made much easier with a pump and CGMS). Katerina's honeymoon didnt outlive her dx hospital stay. However, she has had 3 episodes in the last 5 yrs that her body has somehow "won the battle" and for a few day long period, her insulin needs have been much less than normal (only for the needs to increase when the hneymoon ends). Katerina's T1 seems to mimic my moms older sister (the one who was dx'ed in the 1940's). My aunt who is 67, to this day has those same kinds of episodes of once in a very blue moon needing less insulin for a few days, then kawham, insulin needs are much greater than before. She is on Lantus and Novolog just like Kat. Im glad to say that both women still have both legs all ten toes and a never quit attitude. Both are legally blind, but that doesnt stop them from doing things that require you to use your eyes! :D (Mom still reads email for crying out loud). Im very excited about what the next few years are going to be like for T1D's. We just have to keep hanging on to hope.
     
  6. Jake'sMama

    Jake'sMama Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    580
    Nope here. heck, I don't even understand your post!

    There is alot to learn...
     
  7. Mom211

    Mom211 Approved members

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Messages:
    123
    Amazing, czardoust.

    I learn something every time I am on here!
     
  8. canadianmomto6

    canadianmomto6 Approved members

    Joined:
    May 17, 2009
    Messages:
    181
    I was just coming on here to post a question about honeymoon when I saw this thread. It's one of those phrases we've heard a lot, but still don't quite understand. Since diagnosis our son's insulin needs have changed at least every 3 days, first increasing and now decreasing. It's so confusing, but we keep plugging along.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice