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Pump Transition - at home or in hospital?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by CandiceMcG, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. CandiceMcG

    CandiceMcG Approved members

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    Just wondering where you "celebrated" your first 24 hours on your pumps. Our doctor recommends a hospital stay for monitoring purposes. But in your experience, is that necessary? I ask because we're having trouble scheduling our admission date (plus we've been waiting 3 years for this!), and I'm wondering if we can handle it at home.

    My husband is on the same pump (Ping), having transitioned last year. And as a former statistics professional, I'm pretty good with numbers. What do you think?
     
  2. Toni

    Toni Banned

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    I think most go to their endos for pump start for the day and go home at night like we did. Endo in town offers a three-day pump school overnight in hospital (he waits until he has three sets of families). They are trained for all contingencies. Think that may be overkill, but it would elimate questions as to do when you have problems.
     
  3. Nancy in VA

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    We had training with the pump trainer about a week before pump start, and did a saline trial. then we went into the office and met with the CDE for 3 hours and we were ready to go. I can't imagine a need for a hospital stay.
     
  4. frizzyrazzy

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    We did it at home/dr's office. :)

    We had to stay at the dr's office for about a half a day, but it's in a major hospital, so there were plenty of places for us to go...Our day went like this:
    8am or so, hook up. free to go

    10am back to the clinic for bg check etc
    snack on our own
    12pm back to the clinic for another bg check
    lunch
    2pm back to the clinic - free to leave.

    And then we went out to dinner and at all sorts of things that required 10 boluses and it was completely FUN! It was a bit nerve wracking that first night, but we had already been 2 years into diabetes, so we were prepared. I suspect you'd be JUST fine at home. It's not like this is a new thing for you either.
     
  5. denise3099

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    I can't imagine a situation in which you'd need to be hospitalized for going on the pump, without other health factors. And if your dh is already on one, all the better. If you think of it as just another way to deliver insulin, then you already know what you need to know. Plus you have to learn about the actual unit, and you have to set the basals right.

    I'm NOT saying you should fly solo on this, but admission to a hosptal I think is overkill. When we started, I did pump training online and read Pumping Insulin. I didn't understand any of it really. I read the books that came with the pump--still no real understanding. Then the rep came to the house and showed us everything. She was there for 2 hrs and set us up with saline. then everything clicked and I finally understood all the stuff I'd been studying. A week later the rep came back to answer questions and set us up on the hard stuff. I checked bs religiously and called her each night for 2 or 3 days, as well as sent in the charts. We made adjustments, and stayed in touch. Lots of communication and teaching but no reason to spend time in the hosptial. Besides, that's where they keep all the germs! ;)
     
  6. jennmcc

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    We just went into their office and did training for about 2-3 hours. We left with my daughter pumping. She was 3 years old when she started pumping.

    I would say go with what makes you feel comfortable. If you think you can handle it without the hospital stay then I would do that. Good Luck!
     
  7. frizzyrazzy

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    oh geez, I missed where you said your dh is using the same pump. There's positively NO need for you to stay overnight.
     
  8. thebestnest5

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    We had previously completed a saline trial with DD. DH also completed a saline trial on himself for three days.

    We demonstrated that we had studied insulin pump therapy and that we would be providing BG numbers on an insulin pump log via fax to the doctor's office/CDE.

    We went to the CDE's office, set up the pump; did the first site change, and we were out of there and on our way home within an hour.
     
  9. Michelle'sMom

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    I loved this!:D

    We drove 6 hours to the endo for saline trial/pump class last month. We thought we were set for pump start at home Mon Feb 8. Animas trainer called today & we will do start in a nearby town (easier with her schedule & more to do while we hang out for the day) on Sunday.

    I can see the advantages to a hospital stay, but for my DD the trauma of being hospitalized again would outweigh any advantages.
     
  10. candise

    candise Approved members

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    Wow- I have never heard of hospitalization for a pump start. We started pumping 4 months post diagnosis. The CDE came to our home and spent about 2 hours with us. We had watched the DVD that came with the pump ahead of time. We asked for no saline trial and our Dr. agreed. I think as parents we do have a say in how pump starts are conducted. If you are comfortable and your daughter is as well, you should have a conversation with the doctor regarding your opinion.
     
  11. Beach bum

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    Animas came to our home about a week prior to train and do the saline start.

    Then we went down to the endo and the loaded it with insulin, recapped some basics, gave us basals and ratios, and sent us on our way. We called in our #'s daily, made any changes needed, then went back for a follow up a week later.

    Checked in weekly with our nurse and we made changes as needed, we did this for some time, more for my comfort.

    Isn't it common, though, in some European countries to go in the hospital for pump transition?
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Trainer came here - we went live with insulin, no saline, haven't looked back. ;)
    Hospital stay?? I don't think so :rolleyes:
     
  13. swellman

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    Met with CDE week prior who knew nothing about the OmniPod - was a waste of 3 hours. The supplies came in during the week. I read the manual, called the endo and asked his opinion of pump start at home, solo. He asked us a few questions, suggested a starting basal and we never looked back.
     
  14. Charliesmom

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    Charlie was 3 1/2 years old. We did classes before the start but the day he went live with insulin we had a 2 1/2 hour appt. where we hooked him up and the trainer walked me through the initial programming. Then we went home and the trainer and I communicated through phone and email to go over the numbers and changes needed.
    For us a hospital stay would be a waste of time and money.
     
  15. Kayeecee

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    Couldn't agree with this post more. This was our experience, too. I can't believe that the insurance companies actually pay for going into the hospital!
     
  16. mmgirls

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    OK so we did do a one night at the hospital, in hindsight we totally did not need it. Hospital staff was worthless when it came to D care let alone a pump.

    My dd was only 18 months and my husband was away and the endo had never put someone so small on the pump, and I really think that the insurance required it.

    But if i had to do it again, definatly at home keeping things as normal as possible.
     
  17. jcanolson

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    Our endo wanted to do a hospital stay since he had never put anyone that young on a pump before, but our pump trainer was totally against it. She cited the germs, artificial and stressful environment as issues. Endo finally agreed. We did saline on me for a couple days then went to his office for 2-3hours and hooked her up. We were in contact with the Animas nurse daily or every other day for awhile. Endo's office did not want to be doing the initial adjustments. Libby was great!
     
  18. Hollyb

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    Reading up at home, then 2 hours in the clinic and home. Called in numbers like at dx.

    I can't see the point of being in hospital AT ALL.
     
  19. CandiceMcG

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    Thank you!

    Thanks for all your input everybody! It's so nice to hear from you experts! =)
     
  20. nanotechmama

    nanotechmama New Member

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    We have begun the transition to the pump, and it will include a 4 day hospital stay. The hospital here, however, is not stressful at all, and my daughter chose to do the in-patient. (We also have a choice.)

    I am glad she chose the in-patient, because she will be checked every hour at night, and my husband and I don't really want to have to do that.

    Currently our daughter is on conservative therapy, two injections twice a day with relatively fast acting and slow acting insulin (Actrapid and Insulatard). During the hospitalization we will switch to the multiple daily injections. The fast-acting insulin will be switched to the extremely fast acting one that is also in the pump, and the slow acting one will also be switched to the one that is used in the pump.

    We live in Switzerland, and when she was diagnosed she was hospitalized for 2 weeks. We got (and still get) so much help, and the hospital is unlike anything I ever experienced in the States.
     

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