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Pump activated ---- my mouth misfires

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by rutgers1, Oct 21, 2011.

  1. rutgers1

    rutgers1 Approved members

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    So, today we went to the doctor to set up Matt's new pump (saline for this week). It was a pretty stressful experience for me, as I had just spent the entire night chasing a high and was really, really, really tired. I also kept wondering how he was going to take it (He was great!).

    So, just as they activated the pump and we were cleaning up and getting ready to leave, something weird came over me and suddenly I became Santa Clause. Matt had a moment of uncertainty (said he didn't like the feel of having the pump attached), and suddenly I blurted out, "Let's get out of here and get that cell phone you wanted."

    The cell phone he wanted was an iphone........and I had previously told him "no" about 10,000 times. Yet in that brief moment of weakness when it looked like he might be changing his mind about the pump, suddenly I reached for the only thing that I could think of that would change the topic of conversation.

    I know, stupid. Moment of weakness. I guess I can't go back now, lol. Next time, I'll say "Let's go get that ice cream cone you wanted"
     
  2. Mommy For Life

    Mommy For Life Approved members

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    LOL Can you be my Santa Clause too? I know the feeling of wishing you had a backspace on your mouth. It isn't easy watching our kids handle "D" life without offering "currency" to smooth out the "tough times". My daughter hasn't been diagnosed for very long and it does seem like it has been xmas here too. Our family has sent her cash, I've taken her to get a new barbie, and her dad has brought home goodies that we never would have done had she not been diagnosed with D.

    All I can say is try to count to 10 or maybe 20 before you speak. ;)

    Good luck on the pump...we can't wait to get on one soon...so we can enjoy ICE CREAM!! :)
     
  3. mmgirls

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    you better get some carb counting apps for that!
     
  4. BittysMom

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    I can totally put myself in that situation and imagine how you felt. There is only so much we can do to make it easier for them, my mind searches for things to make her happy. Luckily at 5, it's a lot cheaper;)
     
  5. MommaKat

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    Ouch. I can totally see myself doing something like that, and I would not be able to put the money where my mouth is. Good luck with the pump start, though I think I might be sure and get my money's worth out of the Santa moment. You know, meeting every I'm not so sure about, or I don't like with some logical, helpful plan followed by a reference to the iphone and all that comes with it.
     
  6. Mimi

    Mimi Approved members

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    I completely relate to this!!

    We started our saline start last Monday. That part went well. What didn't go well was the insertion of the CGM sensor. It hurt, even with the Emla cream and my dd cried. :( In almost 3 years of this, she has only cried one other time. She then declared that she didn't want to continue with the CGM....and we hadn't even hooked up the transmitter yet!

    So, I bribed her. :eek: We went for lunch after and if she continues with the CGM for one month she gets a shopping day at the really big mall!! :rolleyes:

    Not my best parenting moment but in the end with all she has to do and deal with...heck, she deserves it!
     
  7. swellman

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    I totally sympathize ... my plan is to half spoil him. I'm not a drill sergeant, although I'm sure my son thinks so, I'm a parent who empathizes with my child's condition. I say "no" a lot but sometimes I say yes when I know it's probably not the best thing to do. I can only hope he realizes this before I'm long gone.
     
  8. Hayden'sMom

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    oh my... in our house it was roller-blades!! ;) Don't feel bad... here's to smooth sailing on the pump... and some great carb counting apps on that phone :)
     
  9. kimmcannally

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    There have been more bribes in this household since J was dx! :p

    Our current bribe is if we get his A1c back to a 6.6 or below (next check in February) he will get a $60 game for his Xbox.
    I figure that's $20 a month, money well spent to keep him healthier.
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Ditch the word "bribe". When I have to do something that is stressful or makes me uncomfortable there's nothing like a reward to make it all better. ;)

    My kid gets rewards for doing all the rubbish that living with D requires. Not because she wouldn't do it without the reward, but because I want her to know that I appreciate and understand that it isn't easy, and yet she does what needs to be done. Rewards are good.:cwds:
     
  11. Tricia22

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    In order to be discharged from the hospital back when I was first diagnosed in 1994, I had to do ALL my shots and fingerpokes myself (this was per the doc, not my parents) - so of course I did it all to be able to go home...
    Then, after getting home, for whatever reason, I chickened out and WOULD NOT do shots myself anymore. In comes the bribe... If I went back to doing all my shots myself) except hard to reach spots were with assistance for pinching, I could get my ears pierced... so... do all the poking of myself, and I could get someone else to poke me as a reward... kind of an ironic reward in hindsight, but it worked... and actually after about 6 months maybe into diagnosis, I have done all the pokes myself, and would never let anyone else poke me for shots or fingersticks for the diabetes. I even remember needing shots at a physical for school and asking if I could do the shots myself since I always shot myself at home... the nurse was REALLY confused at that one until my mom told her I had diabetes and did insulin shots all the time.
     

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