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Pull him from school or ???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by bisous, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. bisous

    bisous Approved members

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    Hi everyone. We're still having problems at DS' school. They refuse to test in the classroom even though we have a 504. Today I asked if they would at least have an adult walk him from his classroom to the office. He's been running low all weekend and then this morning he ate half his breakfast and refused to finish it even though I gave him all of his insulin! I gave him juice to make up for the carbs but juice doesn't always keep him up as well as more complex carbs. The nurse said she'd check "if she could do that".

    Well I happened to be at the school this morning (for a K walk through for DS2) and no adult walked him down.

    SO...

    Do I make a stink about it? Do I pull him until they get their act together?

    On the one hand I'm not even sure he's safe at school with this kind of attitude. On the other, we'd be the ones who would suffer. DS is doing well at school despite being the new kids and despite having D and ADHD. I don't want to knock that. But I feel totally disrespected and I'm just not sure what is best for him.

    Our endo wants him tested in the classroom pronto, too.

    I'm still waiting to be contacted by the ADA...

    I'm thinking I'm going to have to pull him as this is a safety issue.

    I just feel badly for DS.
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    I wouldn't mess around with the ADA. I'd go ahead and file a complaint with the OCR/U.S. Department of Education if you're sure that going up the chain of command with the school won't do any good. I did one two summers ago against a local summer camp, and it was a very positive experience. They have forms on their website that you fill out and submit, and they responded pretty darn quickly for a government agency.

    I'm sorry the school is forcing your hand. :(
     
  3. JaxDad

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    I agree with hawkeyegirl if you have already talked to the school/district superintendent. I would at least copy any SENIOR administrative folks within the district but not the school if you decide to go to OCR.

    I would also try to find any and all available options to leave him in school - even if that means you going to the school to test if possible.
     
  4. Becky Stevens mom

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    Jenn, I just wanted to say how sorry I am that youre still dealing with this nonsense:mad::( The nurse said she would check if she could do that? If she could do what? get up and bring your ds to the office to check him:confused: Would she prefer a lawsuit if anything happens to him while walking down there unescorted? I do have it in Steven's that if he feels unwell an adult must walk him down or his kit brought to the classroom to test him there. I still dont understand the problem they are having with testing him in class. I think you should follow Hawkeyegirl's instructions and try to keep him in school if at all possible. From what I understand, if you have to hire a lawyer the school will have to pay for it.
     
  5. BittysMom

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    I am so sorry for this nonsense. My daughter is walked to the nurse by an adult for her BG checks and when/if she gets hurt/doesn't feel well.

    I would do what you can to keep him in and safe if at all possible. I know that isn't an easy feat. Have you thought of bringing this to the attention of your superintendent or board of ed? That was going to be my next step because they usually (at least here) put pressure on the individual school to make the problem "go away".
     
  6. Christopher

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    I agree with the above poster to take it to the OCR/DoE. Also, I don't know how much contact you have had with the Principal, but I would go to their office and politely let them know that since they are not abiding by the Federal law that, for your son's safety, you are elevating this issue to the DoE.

    Good luck
     
  7. bisous

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    Thanks, all. I have talked extensively to the principal and she insists that the testing in the classroom issue is in the hands of the district administrators and there isn't a thing she can do. I even mentioned the OCR but she's not intervening.

    I'm going to skip the ADA then. We need help NOW.

    The superintendent is my last option. I'll call his office right now. Somebody at the district has got to have enough sense not to get this thing elevated. I've avoided it at all costs but it is time to get things going!

    Thanks a million for your input and for "getting it".
     
  8. Mish

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    Absolutely go up the chain of command. If the principal is pawning it off on the district, then call them and say "hey, this is what we want to have happen regarding my son's care at school and the principal says it's YOUR fault that it's not happening. Because I don't feel that my child is safe at school I need someone to address this issue by TOMORROW morning or else I will be filing a complaint with OCR / DOE tomorrow." period. Don't let anyone else pawn if off. That's what they're doing. They hope that if they pass the buck you won't follow up on it.
     
  9. Flutterby

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    I agree with the others, go up the chain, go to the district, if they don't straighten it out by tomorrow, then contact the ORC.
     
  10. bisous

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    I've got an appointment tomorrow with the superintendent. The asst. was at our 504 meeting and is fully apprised of all the issues we're having.

    So I'm not sure the Super will do anything but I'm hoping, hoping, hoping that this will work!

    Seriously, at this point they are being so belligerent that I'm not sure that if they cave on "this issue" that it will be enough. I'm thinking I need all the protections and provisions written into my 504 plan that I can muster.

    This is so ridiculous.
     
  11. denise3099

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    Whenever I don't get what I want I ask someone else. I am a bonafide pest.

    If they teacher said no, ask the principal, if he says no, ask the superindendent, etc, last stop the supreme court. I'm not even joking. I have emailed the department of special services, case worker, principal, and superindendent, and cc'd everyone on the school board (on another matter). I would not hesitate to contact the superintendent. And if I don't get resolution by 3 pm, I cc the New York Times, the Star Ledger, etc. and start calling the news channels. I'm not even joking in the least. If I don't get satisfaction, I'm taking it to the streets!

    24 hours is the max I would wait for the answer I want to hear.
     
  12. denise3099

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    Awesome!! Walk in with a pleasant smile and start with, "I know you will be willing to help me protect my son so I wanted to discuss this issue with you."

    Then "As you know ds has a right to test in class and all of the legal advice I've sought has indicated the same. I'm sure you can inform the principal, nurse and teacher that my son will be testing in class effective today. Thank you so much for your time." Big smile.

    Walk in like it's a given, but pleasant. Not like you are asking for a favor but rather asking that he relay the fact that your sone is testing in class from now on to the staff.

    Oh, and if he says no, then ask who you can speak to that can forward this information to the school.
     
  13. hawkeyegirl

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    Also, tell them that you would like their denial of your requests in writing. I'd be tempted to write them down myself right there (ex: "Ballyhoo School denies Child X the right to test in the classroom") and ask them to sign it right then. It lets them know that you're serious, and that you're not letting this drop with them.
     
  14. cdninct

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    As long as they continue to be difficult, absolutely. While this will certainly sour a relationship and should be avoided if you really believe you need to be cordial and continue to work together with them, it sounds like you've moved past that point. It is amazing how quickly bureaucrats backpedal when they are asked to sign their names to things!

    Good luck tomorrow!
     
  15. LJM

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    Take it to OCR. Make THEM change, do not let them force you out.
     
  16. bisous

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    Thanks, all.

    Getting him to sign is a good idea. I'm telling you, I KNOW that the OCR will get these guys to do these things. I don't know how or what the consequences will be but let it suffice to say that I have two acquaintances who have successfully sued their school districts for full-time aides for their CWD and the districts have had to eat the cost. If the superintendent has even an ounce of sense, he'll see the folly of continuing to push me around!

    And if he doesn't, I think being nice is totally futile. They need to learn that this can NEVER HAPPEN AGAIN. The next mom might not be so pushy or determined and their child could have an incident at school and I just can't let that happen.

    I'm all fired up right now but really, I'm hoping that the superintendent will wise up and get me what I need!
     
  17. jules12

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    Good luck tomorrow. I am with the others about asking for their denials in writing. They will probably be reluctant to do so. Don't give up. This is something you will deal with for a long time in school. I would try to call the ADA or ORC and maybe they can give you some pointers prior to the meeting.

    I am so sorry you have to do this. Hang in there!
     
  18. selketine

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    Sorry I haven't kept up with what is in your 504 - but does it say that "testing CAN be done" in the classroom - but doesn't specify that it WILL be done (by a responsible adult who can treat highs/lows). Does the 504 also say that your child will be escorted to the health room for testing by a responsible adult if complaining of being low or acting low?

    I'm just wondering if the wording you have in the 504 will stand up for OCR. For example, it says in William's 504 that he can be tested and treated anywhere at the school but he is not allowed to self-test and treat in the classroom (except under emergency lock-down conditions). His 504 does not say that someone WILL come to his room to test - but they are allowed to do so. In other words, being allowed to be tested in the classroom is different than requiring he be tested in the classroom (i.e. the nurse coming there).

    Certainly an adult should go with him to the health room (or responsible child if he is older - depending also on the size of your school and location of the classrooms). That should be in writing in the 504 - is it? It should specify if only an adult go with him or another kid can walk him down.

    **I went back and read an earlier thread and you noted it says "Child WILL be tested by adult in classroom." I suppose the 504 doesn't also say he will be tested in health room or other rooms but this is the typical place he is to receive treatment. I'm thinking that OCR may seek a compromise on that one if the school seeks to also allow for treatment in the health room - if a responsible adult escorts him. They may see it as an "option" rather than the only place he can receive care - or the primary place. I understand why you want it (the ADD is enough for me - I totally get it). The reasons the school gives are fairly weak - so you have that in your favor. Make sure you put this all in WRITING to the Super when you meet him(her) - hand him a letter and follow up with a letter - and one to the school. You will need a good paper trail for OCR to make it easier.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2012
  19. sooz

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    Keep in mind how little most people know about type 1 when you are trying to make your point, even the nurses. What I have found works well for us is to have a quiet, serious discussion of what might happen if she is not monitored closely, or if she walks to the office by herself with a low. I make it pretty dramatic and since I can't talk about stuff like that without tearing up, they are left with a much greater understanding that it is't just legal rights you are demanding because you can, it is all about the life of your child. Make sure they understand that this is life or death. Good luck.
     
  20. Beach bum

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    Yes, you want to show OCR that you have made all possible attempts to address this, that you have gone up the chain of command.

    I really can't understand schools sometimes. IMO, bg testing in the class is a mole hill. They make it into a mountain, they create their own problems by not allowing testing in a classroom. OY.
     

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