- advertisement -

Psssst, you're low...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Ronin1966, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    When a diabetic is low, often times the resistance (someone pointing out the obvious truth) to that fact is pretty impressive. Heck its so obvious the blessed family goldfish knows we're freakin low, even if we (the diabetic(s)) strangely deny it The diabetic's brain is quite literally shutting down, the ability to move or make any coherent sense is disappearing FAST.

    So my question, when folks encounter resistance to whatever degree you get it....how do you get around that proverbial "stone wall" so many will/do put up? In short, real low how do you get around my resistance, when dealing with your diabetic(s)? Can't tell you.... what kind of car I drive... what the article I'm writing is about... but I'm somehow adamant I AM NOT WAAAAAAY LOW...

    What do you do in that game, with your diabetic(s)?
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2013
  2. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    I never ever see this with lows, but see it with highs often. Lows here lead to ravenous and ridiculous hunger followed by binge eating. I'm exaggerating...sort of! He feels his lows very keenly, let's leave it at that. :D

    Highs now, we have a problem. He's mean and argumentative and I wouldn't want him behind the wheel. Good news is that he's also pretty good about taking suggestion about this and will test to prove me wrong...though I rarely am.

    I can't say that we so much get around it, just suggest a quick test to see, and he's usually amenable. Then we deal with whatever is found to be truth. Sometimes we're wrong and he's just grumpy.
     
  3. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,739
    I would strongly suggest purchasing a CGM so that lows are caught way before they reach that stage.
     
  4. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    My dd feels her lows, so we have not encountered resistance. Although we have a friend who fits your description, even becomes combative. His wive and coworkers try not to argue just hand him juice or a soda. If that fails they usually call for EMT.

    I don't understand why diabetics respond differently to their lows, some confused, or combative, and others can sense a lows.
     
  5. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Hello nanhsot:

    A spooky common phenomena re: lows... What's the tiger in the room we're not mentioning...? Its a fair discussion... And regardless, thank you for sharing.

    <<I wouldn't want him behind the wheel.

    Pre driving testing isn't iron-clad protocol hummmmngh?

    >>Then we deal with whatever is found to be truth. Sometimes we're wrong

    The "ring" on my finger says YOU cannot BE wrong... (ever) :D. Do you downplay it, or reword it so its not always a quest about some "magical" number? At times my lovely wife will perform the "leeching" if I challenge her belief... she wants blood, she gets it -lol-. Won't do it to myself, but if she wants the job shes earned the privilege.

    <<and he's just grumpy.

    Sleepy and dopey come to mind too! But the other 5 on that list include angry, snotty, goofy, and snippy too of course.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  6. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Hello MomofSweetOne:

    Thank you for taking part. But what is your take on such resistance...:? What do you think is the origin?
    As to your other point unfortunately CGM readings are not remotely "actionable" without massive & mandatory re-confirmation. As such at best currently they are only wishful thinking...
     
  7. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Hello Bigbluefrog;

    Thank you for taking part as well. Looking forward to the study of such things, some day.

    <<My dd feels her lows, so we have not encountered resistance.

    An interesting point... what happens if "resistance" is NOT predicated upon a severe low :cool: ? Done by the wrong person, or in an offensive/obnoxious way, you'll get the same response if someone were textbook perfect too I wager!

    I question whether the so-called "awareness" is the right trigger, for such episodes?
     
  8. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    My son does test before driving, or has his CGM. Despite your other reply, CGM does not require constant reconfirmation (or whatever your wording was). It's pretty reliable actually and if he feels well and his CGM backs that up, we're good.

    I trust my son quite a bit. I don't mind being wrong and have apologized to him more than a few times for assuming he was high when he was just in a bad mood. He's highly instinctual about his body, his diabetes, his care and management. Sure he makes mistakes but he owns them and corrects. He feels lows, keenly. He recognizes his behavior changes from highs. Highs truly are the tiger in our home.

    I ask him to test and he does. We've not had resistance or rebellion in our home at this point. We have open and honest discussions regularly. Not to say we never will, but knock wood, he's very responsible. He's heading to college in the fall so much will change in the next year.

    Perhaps you are seeing this through the prism of a husband, and I can see how that dynamic would be completely different. I literally pray regularly for my son's (future) wife. I think it must be quite a tightrope act on both sides of that dynamic. I can see how my husband would bristle in a situation as you describe where my son just tests. He sees me as the authority from a medical management point, just as he sees me as one of the authority figures in his home (though he's the authority in his own body). I wouldn't think that would be true in any way for a wife.
     
  9. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Hello nanhsot:

    <<CGM does not require constant reconfirmation

    Check his instruction manual... :( (the pages about calibration & acting on readings...)

    <<Highs truly are the tiger in our home.

    Ugggh, know that game.

    <<Perhaps you are seeing this through the prism of a husband

    Could well be, was one of the reasons I asked.... but a combat I've had with too many to believe it only a "parent" thing. In truth I dont know the specific role matters, friend, sister, mate, partner, lover, stranger.... its the same game for everybody.

    Hey something's wrong....

    NOOOOOOOOOOO its not

    :confused:

    :eek:
     
  10. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,739
    Ronin,

    The CGM manuals are written with the intent to protect the company from lawsuits. Real life is a different matter. They do catch lows and highs before they become sympomatic or more than mildly sympomatic the vast majority of the time. We treat lows without reconfirming at least 1/2 of the time. If my daughter doesn't come up on the CGM, then we check. Sometimes she's still steady, sometimes she's now higher, and sometimes she's continued to drop. It's not perfect, but using one is far, far better than going without. For both family and the T1 in our family's experience. Lows and highs are extremely stressful on everyone. They're worth avoiding. If you're having problems with either, I don't understand your resistance to seeking out a device that is a game changer in a positive way.
     
  11. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    My ex-stepdad was incredibly resistant when low. He would bite and punch and become physically violent - to the point that my mom couldn't handle it anymore. She would literally sit on him and force honey down his mouth.

    My daughter has been insistent that she isn't low a few times, but I still can get her to eat. Interestingly, it seems to happen with both of them at night, when they are sleeping. They don't want to be woken up and get combative.
     
  12. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Hello MomofSweetOne:

    Manuals are written for legal protection, but they are also entirely accurate in their assertion as well. The numbers are either clinically accurate or they are not. If I have to re-confirm anything, its wishful thinking. I understand the emotional attachment, the comfort they provide parents, relatives, but unless they catch them all... in my view its telemarketing 101.

    Does the technology prevent this fear? Does it prevent your child's fears? To me it is a security blanket, which does not do the job remotely well enough. When they are CLOSED loop and "sentient" so that nobody can screw up and use too much insulin, eat too little, overestimate some piece/part, so that it will take our guess work out of the equation, THEN, I will have faith....

    Now I cannot. Too many factors are in play. Unless/until the readings are veinous... its guess work. THe best we can do, but still guessing none the less.

    that regard as well.

    The CGM manuals are written with the intent to protect the company from lawsuits. Real life is a different matter. They do catch lows and highs before they become sympomatic or more than mildly sympomatic the vast majority of the time. We treat lows without reconfirming at least 1/2 of the time. If my daughter doesn't come up on the CGM, then we check. Sometimes she's still steady, sometimes she's now higher, and sometimes she's continued to drop. It's not perfect, but using one is far, far better than going without. For both family and the T1 in our family's experience. Lows and highs are extremely stressful on everyone. They're worth avoiding. If you're having problems with either, I don't understand your resistance to seeking out a device that is a game changer in a positive way.[/QUOTE]
     
  13. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,367
    [/QUOTE]

    No disrespect intended, but I don't believe you're in a position to comment on CGMs as "not doing the job remotely well enough" until you've used one and/or had a CGM alert you to the fact that your child's blood glucose is plummeting at warp speed in the middle of the night an hour after you did a fingerstick.

    Also, are you aware that readings from the best, most accurate meter that money can buy are not entirely accurate?

    From Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy by Marie McCarren on diabetic Living:

    Minimum Acceptable Meter Accuracy

    The ISO figures, based on device testing, do not guarantee results or protect against common user errors.

    When glucose range of blood sample is Lower than 75 mg/dl:

    95 percent of the results must fall within +/- 15 mg/dl
    When glucose range of blood sample is 75 mg/dl or Higher:

    95 percent of the results must fall with +/- 20 percent

    Examples of Acceptable Accuracy:

    If the lab result is 70 mg/dl:

    The meter reading must be within 55-85 mg/dl
    If the lab result is 100 mg/dl:

    The meter reading must be within 80-120 mg/dl
    If the lab result is 200 mg/dl:

    The meter reading must be within 160-240 mg/dl



    Speaking for myself, my daughter's BG as measured by her meter has never been more than 15 mg/dL different (and is usually no more than 6mg/dL different) from the reading on her CGM.
     
  14. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2013
    Messages:
    842
    Someone way smarter than me once opined "Do not let the perfect get in the way of the good."

    If you can obtain technology that catches bad events 90% of the time that is "good". Just sayin'.
     
  15. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,739
    No disrespect intended, but I don't believe you're in a position to comment on CGMs as "not doing the job remotely well enough" until you've used one and/or had a CGM alert you to the fact that your child's blood glucose is plummeting at warp speed in the middle of the night an hour after you did a fingerstick.[/QUOTE]

    Agreed with the above.

    OP, for posting about being resistance to testing for lows, you seem to not want to hear that CGM could eliminate much, if not all, of that. My daughter has hit one or maybe two BGs lower than 50 in the past year during the wonderful fast drops in insulin needs females in puberty have. I was already treating one in the 70s (thank you, CGM, for alerting me that this fast drop was in progress!) that turned into a 48 within 10 minutes. If your resistance to testing and treating lows involves physical combativeness as I've read about, I would be seeking a separation if I were your wife because there is no need for her to be subjected to that in this day and age of diabetes monitoring. She shouldn't be subjected to that because of your resistance to wearing a device that may not be perfect but is still an incredible tool.
     
  16. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030
    To each their own, but have you trialed the Dexcom G4?

    I bet you if you searched this site with the words "Life changing" you would pull up numerous posts about the Dexcom CGM. From the get go, before a parent could possibly form an emotional attachment to the CGM or have any comfort level with the device, parents and adult users feel that it is just that Life changing.

    catching just 1 low when there is a ton of IOB and heading it off at the pass or the savings of not only money but finger pokes to just see if you totally missed the mark while swaging carbs.

    The CGM alone will never take away the "too many factors' but it surely does but a better perspective on all of those factors when you can not only have a number but a directional arrow.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice