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Please help me!!!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by MKmomof2, Oct 27, 2012.

  1. MKmomof2

    MKmomof2 New Member

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    My daughter is 5, she was diagnosed 3 weeks ago. I took her out last night and forgot to bring her novolog pen, and we were an hour or so away from home. I called and called and couldnt get any of our "on call" people on the phone to call in a pen to a nearby pharmacy. We ate at 6, halfway through the meal is when i realized i didnt have the pen. Her bs was 89 before meal, she only ate enough to need one unit. She takes her lantus at 8 so i gave her that at 8, but Her BS started going up, got to 380, finally got in touch with the on call doctor who said she was not in immediate danger, just to correct her when we got home. So when I got home she was 320 and I gave her 2 units of novolog...tested her at 2:00 and she was 71 which is low so I gave her half a banana. I am so nervous...what should I expect tomorrow/rest of tonight? I am new to all of this and worried that by missing that shot I have done serious damage to her body! Please help!!!
     
  2. sooz

    sooz Approved members

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    You have not done any damage to her, let alone lasting damage. We have all made mistakes. In the future you will probably see lots of numbers in the 300's just because. Because maybe she is coming down with a cold. Or growing, or entering puberty, or excited about something, or just plain because she has type 1 dIabetes . You should use this episode as a learning experience and figure out a way to make sure it doesn't happen again because you forgot the insulin. For us, my granddaughter has what we call her care kit, and it goes where ever Hailey goes. It is a Hello Kitty lunch bag that has all her D needs in it. For insurance, maybe you could have the doctor write out a prescription you could tuck into your purse. Also, you can have your child eat a low carb meal. Don't beat yourself up. Learn from it and move on. It will be ok.
     
  3. Brenda

    Brenda Junior Member

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    Over time, you will relax more about diabetes and realize that highs and lows occur no matter how vigilant you are. In general, damage to the body is minimal unless there are consistent highs or lows. That said, you will learn how your daughter behaves when high or low. With highs, in addition to the usual extra thirst, you may see that she seems grouchier or more sensitive. With lows, she might feel hungry and get a headache. You will probably overtreat some lows and get highs later or her body will naturally rebound and be high later. You may find that she needs more insulin for certain foods/meals (many people need to give more insulin per carb for a breakfast of cereal than a breakfast of multigrain toast and an egg).

    As Sooz said, this is a learning experience and you may have many more such experiences along the way. Don't beat yourself up for forgetting the insulin; it can happen to any one of us, even those who have lived with diabetes for many years.
     
  4. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

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    I hope that with the morning light things are settled for you. This is all SO new, too new actually and it does seem overwhelming I know. We've all been there with that first low and feeling panicky.

    What I can assure you is that you did not do any damage, this is all part of being Type 1. You'll see 70 again and you'll see 300 again. It may not happen for a while because your daughter is likely to begin honeymoon soon if not already and her body will work hard to keep that from happening, but over time these type fluctuations will just be part of her life and you will learn to deal with them competently, quickly, and with confidence in your knowledge. The low you saw could have been her own body trying to normalize her, that's part of honeymoon, the pancreas start working again after things settle down and you are giving insulin.

    Right now 300 seems SCARY, and 70 makes you panic. But you did everything just right. You got your daughter home and gave her the insulin she needs. Good job! I can't imagine that there is even one parent here who can say they've not made a mistake of some kind.

    Hope things are going well this morning, glad you found us here, and take it one day, one minute, one shot at a time. You'll make more mistakes and you'll beat yourself up again over them! But your daughter will be OK, you'll learn what to do, you'll see highs and lows. It's all part of the package.
     
  5. William

    William Approved members

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    Ask for a prescription for a continuous glucose monitor. We did so a month after diagnosis (Dexcom). It has taught us the most.
     
  6. DsMom

    DsMom Approved members

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    Definitely agree with all that has been said already. Those high numbers will really get to you in these early days. I remember feeling sick to my stomach if a 300 came up...and was sprinting for the juice boxes for anything even close to 70.;) You will live and learn when it comes to D...but listening to the advice and experience of those here can help as well. Hope everything feels calmer for you today.

    In the future, you may want to use a fast-acting source of glucose such as a juice box, glucose tablets, Skittles, Smarties, etc. to treat lows. My son doesn't eat bananas...but I'm not sure how quick something like that would bring up a low...particularly a stubborn one. You want to use something that is pure glucose with no fat or anything that can slow down its absorption. We like the glucose tabs when he is awake because they are only 4 carbs each and I can be more precise in how much I give to him...one or two for a minor low, more for a lower low. When he is sleeping, I use juice boxes, because he will drink one in his sleep without ever waking up...just like a baby drinking a bottle!
     
  7. roo'smom

    roo'smom Approved members

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    You did fine - no permanent damage done. It's hard in the beginning to remember everything you need to bring with you when you go out, but it does become a habit. It will also get easier when/if you decide to use a pump - your insulin is always with you :p Hope you're feeling better about everything today:)
     
  8. Mrs Puff

    Mrs Puff Approved members

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    We have a 'betes bag (pronounced the Wilford Brimley way: beetus) that is pretty much always ready to go. However, even after almost two years after diagnosis we still forget to check the supplies. We were an hour away from home on our way to the endo when my son discovered he only had two test strips. One would be for the endo and one was for dinner. However, he was hungry and we had just bought snack at a fastfood place. He couldn't check his BG, so he just dosed for the food. It all turned out ok. In the early days I would have panicked. You learn to just go with the flow. Recently we also went to town with an empty novolog pen. So, we have learned to check our supplies again. :eek:
     
  9. lcblk27

    lcblk27 Approved members

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    Welcome to the site and Im sorry you have had to find us. My son was just under 5 when diagnosed, now he's 6. It is so hard in the begining to remember everything and such a sinking feeling when you realize you forgot something!

    We also have a "kit" that holds his lantus and novalog pens, Glucagon, meter, test strips, poker and extra lancettes, extra pen needles and a few pieces of candy for lows. I always have pen needles and candy for lows in my purse too. And still, I forget things sometimes. It happens and you will see many highs and lows to come, so dont worry about that. I have seen my son as low as 30's and as high as..well, "HI" meaning over 600. I have learned just to treat and move on.

    It sounds like you did just fine, part of the battle is knowing how to fix things when they dont go according to plan ;) That is also why its important to check blood sugar frequently. Be gentle with yourself in this begining, you will get everything figured out and being high or low now and then will not do any damage to your daughter. (Hugs)
     
  10. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    There was a thread a while ago about the mistakes we've all made. It might be worth bumping for the newbies. Does anyone know how to find it?
     
  11. DsMom

    DsMom Approved members

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    Do you mean the "10 Things Your Endo Never Told you" thread?
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    No, it was one about the worst D-mistake you've ever made or something like that.
     
  13. Jordansmom

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  14. steph

    steph Approved members

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    Welcome. I am sure that forgetting an essential supply has happened to most, if not all of us. On my daughter's 2nd birthday party at a splash park we check her bg before cake time, only to realize that while we have insulin and all the other goodies, we are out of syringes. ugh. so yes have the diabetes kit that goes everywhere, but also make sure it has everything in it too. being in the 300s every so often isnt going to cause one bit of damage. my DD probably goes into the 300s nearly daily bc we dose after her meals rather than before. damage is caused by being high for months, not hours. once you get comfortable with how your child's body responds to carbs and insulin and you have more experience, these types of things that are so gut wrenching now will not seem like such a big deal.
     

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