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Please help me understand blood results, peds office doesn't know...?!

Discussion in 'Celiac' started by chocoholicsc, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. chocoholicsc

    chocoholicsc Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Messages:
    1,030
    The pediatricians office just called with both girls blood test results. Here's what they told me:

    Oldest daughter
    IGA 112- normal
    IGG 32-elevated
    AGA 7 - normal


    Younger daughter

    IGA 54 -low
    IGG 5 - normal
    AGA 3 - normal

    The NP who called said she asked one of the doctors there and they don't know what this means but will give a referral to a gastro...?
    Both girls show symptoms at times, rushing to the bathroom after eating, strange skin rashes that come and go, lack of energy and sometimes no symptoms. Please help me understand this!

    Thank you!
    Candy
     
  2. aklap

    aklap Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    732
    Hi Candy,

    The tests you have listed are bit non-specific except for the AGA test. Were there any other letters or terms like tTG (Tissue Transglutaminase) or EMA (Endomysial)?

    IgA and IgG are classes of immunoglobulin [antibodies] that your body produces.

    http://kidshealth.org/parent/system/medical/test_immunoglobulins.html

    The AGA test is probably the Anti-Gliadin Autobody. The AGA test looks for anti gluten autobodies that you may be producing.

    For a good explanation of the various Celiac/Gluten tests, check out Dr. Rodney Ford's (a Pediatric Gastro in NZ) website:

    http://www.drrodneyford.com/faq/investigations/gluten-blood-tests.html

    Please keep in mind, celiac testing is not always accurate AND celiac testing primarily looks for intestinal tissue damage. Gluten can affect people but not produce tissue damage. Even if celiac testing is negative, gluten should not be absolved of all guilt. It still could be causing health problems. Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity aka The Gluten Syndrome is just now appearing on radars of celiac experts. It's something that many have known about for years, but medicine is just now catching up. It's validating what many of us have been telling docs...no, we're not crazy...gluten is making us sick!
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2012

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