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Please carry glucagon, you never know...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, May 9, 2014.

  1. mmgirls

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    You know I am usually fine with so many things but once I almost fainted, ringing in ears and blackspots, when my youngest was on my lap getting a simple blood draw not the 2hr OGTT.
     
  2. mom2Hanna

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    Last summer my daughter tripped down some stairs and afterwards she got dizzy and started to pass out. She was a bit low before, but I really think the vaso-vagel response to tripping caused her bg to bottom out very quickly. It was her birthday party and she consumed probably over 100 carbs afterwards and never went over 100 that night. I figured it was kind of the opposite of an adrenaline high. We joke about shoving her down the stairs when her bg is really high. Though if she's REALLY high, she doesn't find it funny. ;)
     
  3. mom2Hanna

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    I pass out when I twist my ankle. It's really great when it happens in public.
     
  4. missmakaliasmomma

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  5. hawkeyegirl

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    They have a nurse with an MA following your daughter around at school? I wish our district had that sort of budget. Not to provide personal nurses to kids with T1, mind you.

    Anyway, I'd follow up and see what the meter actually said, because the situation sounds unlikely to begin with, and when you add in the impossible meter reading, it makes me question the veracity of the nurse.
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

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    With someone else's T1 kid unconscious in her care, the nurse absolutely handled the situation well. We've been told to not even bother to do a BG before glucagon if unconscious. Are the meters going to read very accurately in that range anyway?

    I'm embarrassed as an American to have those from other countries read this thread when so many around the world don't have nurses or anyone to give glucagon at all, and we sit here and second guess someone's decision to use it on a kid that is unconscious for whatever reason.
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

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    Well, it remains to be seen if the nurse handled it well. She apparently fabricated the BG reading, so who knows what is true with respect to the rest of the account?

    It is sort of ironic that one of the only kids on the board with a 1:1 nurse is also one of the only kids on the board who has had to have glucagon administered at school. But that's another conversation.
     
  8. Olivia'sDad

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    Any update on the reading of the school meter?
     
  9. mamattorney

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    If I learned anything from this thread, it's that using glucagon is an OK thing to do. Even if her daughter didn't need it, the after effects were pretty minimal. I think of it as a "life or death" medication, but it shouldn't be put on such a extremely high pedestal. I'm actually a little scared of it. Seeing that red container and thinking about using it makes me think terrible thoughts, but that shouldn't be the case. It should be seen as another tool, maybe not a frequently used one, but it is a tool, not a symbol of catastrophe (which is kind of how I see it).

    ETA: kind of like how I keep a filled prescription of prednisone in my cabinet. I'm asthmatic and if I can't get an attack to stop (has happened a couple of times in 20+ years), I can take a prednisone and that does the trick. It's a STRONG medication, but it doesn't need to be scary.
     
  10. missmakaliasmomma

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    That's something I need to deal with bc it OBVIOUSLY is bothering me too. Over 4 years with D and I have never had to use it on her. 8 months into school and I've had the worst experience with fluctuating bgs and obviously the glucagon. This coming from someone who wanes to home school... this issue does not sit well

    After school. I have more time then, in the morning I'm rushing to get to work. I will update you guys though

    yes, she follows my dd around. They have been trying to find any reason to let her go obviously add more they realise she costs to much. money

    My phone is being stupid. That was supposed to say they have been trying to find a way too let her go bc they realize now that she costs to much money. Mind you, the school nurse advocated for my dd to have an actual nurse, not me. She was supposed to have a 2:1 aid with another child then all of a sudden, my daughter got her own nurse. We have an endo appt next month and I'm going to specifically ask the dr west a tdp can and can't do.


    this does worry me because although she doesn't feel lows, there is no way in hell you wouldn't know she had dipped below 35 ish
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    I can't remember - have you pursued a Dexcom? Personally, given the choice between a Dex and a 1:1 nurse, I'd take the Dex every time.
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

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    I totally agree!
     
  13. missmakaliasmomma

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    Quick ?.. does "lo" save in meter or is it like the error messages
     
  14. caspi

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    I'm sure this goes without saying but I wouldn't tell her why you want to look at the meter. Don't give her a chance to come up with another fabrication.

    And as far as your daughter not feeling her lows, I agree with the others that I would definitely prefer a CGM over a nurse any day.
     
  15. missmakaliasmomma

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    And yes, we were just told to switch the insurance bc the one she was on can't seem to negotiate a contract withdexcom. We switched, should take affect the 1st and they will resubmit the paperwork.

    Id rather have dex too
     
  16. missmakaliasmomma

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    She said there's no 11 in the meter... after listening to you guys though that didn't shock me but she did say that maybe in the moment she saw "lo" and thought it was a 10 or 11...

    I feel like that could happen and it's not totally outlandish. But the 31 is in there and that was after glucagon so I do believe she needed it
     
  17. bamaboyd82

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    We use a different meter, and haven't ever had a LO reading, but our HI readings are saved in the history, so I'm thinking LO's would be, too.

    There was a time once when I looked at our meter from an angle, and it had a reading of 124 (if I recall correctly), and I thought it said 24 and freaked out for a second before realizing. I just offer that because it's possible something like that happened to the nurse in the heat of the moment.
     
  18. bamaboyd82

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    If she was 31 after Glucagon, it sounds like she did need it. You don't have any reason to doubt this nurse's intentions, right? Maybe the reason your daughter fell and hurt her knee is that she was extremely low.
     
  19. Megnyc

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    Yes, lo does save in the aviva. Did you actually look at the meter and see the 31?

    I'm still thinking she wasn't low because glucagon does not work immediately like the nurse said. And quite frankly I'm a bit concerned that an rn ( or is she an np since she has her masters?) doesn't know that.
     
  20. caspi

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    I'm confused -- did you look at the meter personally? If there isn't an 11 there should have been a "LO" but it's only showing the 31??
     

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