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Please carry glucagon, you never know...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, May 9, 2014.

  1. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

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    I'm saying this because the nurse had to use it on my dd today at lunch time. 96 right before, prebolus of about 15 minutes, nothing different about this morning. This is the first time we've ever had to use it. My dd remembers nothing, but I definitely cried for awhile after. I just thank god she had it on her and didn't hesitate to use it. No seizure, just fainting.

    It really doesn't hurt to have it, it could save your child's life.
     
  2. mmgirls

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    I am sorry!

    I just commented on the other thread about glucagon.

    If you can, can you give more info?

    You actually get in a pre-bolus at school? My youngest, just DX but not on insulin yet is just a bit older. maybe there need to be a BG threshold for pre-bolusing at school? Or sometimes what I do at home for breakfast is to do the pre-bolus but include a 8 carb Capri Sun. The drink will bring up BG and I still get in the pre-bolus.
     
  3. susanlindstrom16

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    thank God she was in good hands. sorry that happened :( hope you are doing ok!
     
  4. rgcainmd

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    I'm so happy to hear that your little girl is OK now, but I'm sorry she went through this. Thank G_d for good school nurses who know when and how to use glucagon!
     
  5. missmakaliasmomma

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    From what I know.... She was on line for ice cream. She got a big bolus because the ice cream had been added. Total of 56g which equated to 3.5u. She was 96 before the bolus (I would've still prebolused too). She fell down and hurt her knee on the line and when her nurse went to go over to pick her up and lift her up, her eyes rolled back and her head fell back. She did test her before giving glucagon because she didn't think it was low bg because it's never happened before with a prebolus at 96. Bg-11. I would've just given glucagon, and test after. I didn't even know you could go that low. She ran a little low the day before but had a sub nurse so she doesn't prebolus as much because she's just not as comfortable (right out of college). But was running high the rest of the week so I had raised her basal a little and thought Thursday was a fluke. She said it worked immediately and by the time I was called, she was up and talking. Thank god.

    One thing her nurse told me which I was never told was that glucagon is short lived, expect sugar to go back down. We experienced just that... 391 at school, no correction bc I listened to the nurse (who has given glucagon before) and about 2 hours later, she was 156, then shortly after... 63.

    Also, we did not go to the ER. When I called her dr, I was told that if I could handle it, to stay home, but if it happened again, go. It was fine after that. I felt like if I really didn't have to put her thru the trauma of IVs, I wouldn't.

    And, she never threw up which I defintely was expecting

    Now I feel like I'm too aggressive with keeping her target at 120. Like, maybe at school 150 ish would be better.

    As much as I believe I should've been there when this happened, I'm very glad I wasn't.. Completely selfish I know, but I would've cried for days and felt more guilty than I already do. I'm alright now, I just seriously pray that she doesn't have to go thru that again.

    She's got her own nurse, which is probably the only reason she's prebolused. The Capri sun is a good idea, you account for that in the carbs?
     
  6. sszyszkiewicz

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    lts almost as if the insulin went right into her bloodstream. That is an amazing story. I am glad she is ok.
     
  7. tammy82

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    I'm glad she is ok now. I know it is scary but at least the nurse handled it well

    Yes I always do now learned my lesson while on vacation. The one time I didn't have it on me for a quick trip,to,a,coffee shop at a resort we were staying turned badly. I never want to flip out like that again felt very very helpless as there was nothing I could do. My 9 year old had to run up to the room we were staying (a six digit room number which she remembered) and get the glucagon. By the time she came back made it right before the paramedics. I usually always carry one in my bag but had changed bags for vacation. I had also checked my daughter before we walked to the coffee shop and she was 70 gave her a juice box to drink on the way. Should have waited like I always did. Luckily this only affected a few hours of our morning between the hospital and the rest of the time she was fine. Made sure she ate and stayed higher for a while after. Now I don't care where I go it is always on me.

    We target for around 150 in school,so maybe that is a better idea.
     
  8. hawkeyegirl

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    What meter will give you a reading of 11? How long between the prebolus and when she fainted?
     
  9. Mommy For Life

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    I was thinking the same thing. I thought once you are below 20 it just said LOW. Did your DD have IOB?

    Very scary...glad she is OK.
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'm just going to throw this out there as a possibility.

    I wonder if the event wasn't in fact not a low but some strange confluence of a fall and maybe a bit of a faint? Not saying that you are being untruthful, but it's possible that the bg was in fact 111 and that the person testing misread it. I don't think that there are any meters that read down to 11. Or perhaps the aide is not being 100% factual about the event. Just something to consider.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2014
  11. wilf

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    How long after the bolus was the blood sugar of 11 measured?
     
  12. kiwikid

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    Could this have been a vasovagal reaction and not a low blood sugar? My daughters all faint easily at trauma (no matter how small) to themselves.. The one time I had to give glucagon I could tell it was a very different scenario.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2014
  13. shannong

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    Most meters will have a history that you can scroll through. Wondering the same thing as another poster - if she in fact fainted, rather than had a low. Either way, scary! Sorry you and your daughter had to go through this.
     
  14. missmakaliasmomma

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    At school the nurse uses accuchek aviva plus. I'm going by what SHE told me. She toldrme right after giving glucagon that she was so yes I believe the 11 was accurate. I wouldn't know how low meters go because I've never had her be that low with me. My daughter doesn't have the vasivagal reflux, my sister actually does though. Dd has never fainted before. Now you guys are making me wonder if the nurse was lying so I'm going to ask to see her meter tomorrow. Bolus time on the pump said 1040. Lunch is 11, so not very long.

    Bg of 11 was right before gkucagon. I'm going by what the nurse told me, remember.
     
  15. C6H12O6

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    It seems like that meter should not read at 11 mg/dl. It would say LO. The nurse could lose her licence for charting false data / or conveying false info to you. Did she actually put this in writing ?

    Something here just doesn’t add up.

    If it really does read as low as 11 that would mean in some counties it read at 0.61 mmol
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2014
  16. Megnyc

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    Just so everyone knows the newer contour meters do read down to 10 mg/dl. Anything below that is LO. We use contour meters where I work and surprisingly see blood sugars under 20 mg/dl relatively frequently. It doesn't really matter in this case though since it was an accu chek meter.
     
  17. hawkeyegirl

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    The Aviva Plus reads "LO" below 20. I wonder if the nurse panicked and gave her gluc when she was not, in fact, low and is now trying to cover her tracks. Is she a real nurse or just some sort of health aide?
     
  18. kiwikid

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    Do you have to "have" a vasovagal reflux? Isn't it something that can happen anytime to anyone in a traumatic situation? I would review the meter, and the situation carefully with the nurse - tell her she did the right thing (I would rather have glucagon given than not) and then work from there....
     
  19. rgcainmd

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    The "vasovagal reflex" can be an on-again/off-again response for many people and can vary greatly from situation to situation. For example, I've mucked around in the bloody insides of patients during surgery and once, in a pinch, I started my own I.V. after the tech infiltrated three sites, both of these without any issues. Pain has never caused me to lose consciousness. But I pass out whenever I get an intramuscular injection (e.g. yearly flu shot) unless I'm lying down and stay that way for a good 15 minutes. (Very embarassing.)

    And I agree wholeheartedly with your advice about the nurse. While I would definitely check the meter to verify your daughter's BG reading prior to her receiving glucagon, I would also commend the school nurse; I would rather that my daughter's school nurse err on the side of giving glucagon in a situation where it may not actually be necessary versus not giving it out of fear that it may not be needed. If I'm not mistaken, another mom recently posted about having to give her daughter glucagon, and I believe she mentioned that the package insert said something to the effect that there are no serious lasting side effects from giving glucagon. (Yes, it can make you pretty darn nauseated, but I believe that there are no serious side effects from administering the full dose provided in an emergency glucagon kit.)
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2014
  20. mmgirls

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    Yes it could have been something else, we have had several instances at my dd's school (not involving her) in witch fainting occurred and it was not a low BG.
     

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