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Pens?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Ginagbaby1, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. Ginagbaby1

    Ginagbaby1 Approved members

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    Hello everyone,

    David is on Lantus and Novalog and we use the syringes. Once we are done with our current supply we are going to switch to the pens. I've heard mostly good things about the pens but also heard from someone that the insulin leaked out whenever they tried to use them with their child. I was wondering what you guys thought about them and if they worked out for most of you? Also if anyone has any suggestions or tips for me that would be great.

    Thank you,
    Gina
     
  2. Gracie'sMom

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    We loved the pens, but we have friends who didn't like them and went back to syringes. We found them easy and it didn't scare my dd as much, who had huge needle fears. Now, two years in, she doesn't care so much, but early on anyway. We didn't have any leaking.
     
  3. caspi

    caspi Approved members

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    We are currently using Humalog pens and think they're great! They are easy to transport and we have never had any issue with them. We still do Lantus with a vial and syringe and honestly I'm not sure why, lol. You can always ask for a sample. I'm not sure if Novolog offers a free one, but Humalog does on their website. :cwds:
     
  4. VinceysMom

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    My son uses the Humalog pen at school before lunch...and he brings it home and we use it on weekends. I personally do not care for it because I see insulin leak out whenever I remove the pen from his arm, maybe it is because of the size of our needle, maybe we need longer needles if they even have them for the pens - I really don't know - maybe I am just doing something wrong? And at school they told me he wasnt pushing it all the way at first, but now he gets it right! He just needed a little more guidance ;)
     
  5. MAsDad

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    Novolog pens here, 13 year old DD loves it for school. We got a huge supply of Novolog pens and bottles when she was diagnosed, so she uses the needle at home, the pen at school. Problem with the pen is...wait for it...no half unit doses.

    Lantus also is available in a pen, and most pens take the universal pen needle tips. Get the tiny gauge, 1/4" needles and kid won't feel a thing. As long as he or she knows what he or she is doing, no pain at all. My DD doesn't like to take the bigger 15 unit Lantus doses at bedtime with the pen since it's just harder for her to press down on the "plunger" for that long. The needles we use are awesome for bigger doses like this.

    Go for it!
     
  6. rare

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    Pens are very convenient and that was a huge pro for us. The negative was counting to 30 when doing injections and it would still drop after removing the needle. It always made me wonder if he was getting the full amount or not.
     
  7. McKenna'smom

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    We have been using Novolog Pens and Lantus Pens since being released from the hospital. We love them. The needles are so small and while you do lose some insulin when priming you get better at getting all the insulin injected after using them awhile. Right now McKenna is getting such small doses we end up throwing quite a bit of insulin away after 30 days are up.
     
  8. McKenna'smom

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    They have Novolog Jr. pens that do half doses. If that is needed, you should look into getting a prescription for those.
     
  9. hdm42

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    I was going to mention that. Also, you can get pen needles that are only 3/16". They're the BD Ultra-fine Minis.

    We love pens. That's what we've used from the day they disconnected the IV. We use the novo pens and the lantus refillable & solostar pens. The novo pens are great, very sturdy and solid and easy to us. The lantus pens are ok, but not quite as nice.
     
  10. CassiesMama

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    We love our novopen jr. its solid and the way my daughter bangs her stuff around it takes a beating and still works great. The needles come in so many different sizes. They really are great. We still use syringes for the lantus since our endo dont like to give kids lantus pens till they are using 10 units of it or more.
     
  11. Denise

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    Molly really didn't care for the pens. Not only was it awkward for her hands to handle (she wanted to be able to do it herself)..it's big in appearance and she related that to pain for some reason. We only used the pen a few times and ended up switching back to MDI. We are now on the pump...and prefer that over MDI.
     
  12. MySweethearts

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    We use pens too. The only thing I hate about the pen is the green lilly pen. The only reason why is if you are about to run out of insulin it will not read how much is in there. The lantus pen is better, IMO:)
     
  13. sooz

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    We used the pens before we started pumping and we loved them. Ours did do half units. We were told you have to count to 10 after you give the shot before you pull it out. I believe my daughter primed the pens when she changed the insulin but we were never told to prime the pens before each shot, so be sure to ask about that. We used novolog and levimir pens.
     
  14. hdm42

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    We prime 2 units before every shot, and we also count to (at least) 10 after releasing the plunger before pulling it out to minimize "leakage".
     
  15. Lizzie's Mom

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    Love the pens for convenience . . . for good numbers, not so much. We can be so much more accurate with a syringe, and can actually see what's going in . . . her numbers are definitely better with syringes, so we went back to syringes. Her numbers tended to be high on the pens and I didn't feel comfortable tweaking doses up w/o knowing exactly how much insulin she was getting.

    That said, we continue to get our insulin in pen/cartridge form, as they are easier to store/transport, and since her doses aren't very high, there is less waste. I hated throwing a vial away that was 2/3 full!

    We just draw up the insulin from the port of the pen or refill cartridge. One note - if you alternate between using a pen needle and the syringe, be sure to dial up the dose and push the button end of the pen after you draw up the insulin. We noticed that on the Novolog pen if you don't do this the little disc on the end of the 'corkscrew' gets crooked and won't push the cartridge plug up correctly. I would think that might be important if you need to dose with the pen needle for accuracy.

    If you get the cartridge refills, here's a tip: for the Novolog cartridges, the plunger end-cap from a syringe will fit over the port end of a cartridge to keep it clean between uses.

    It's late and I hope that made at least a little sense :rolleyes:!
     
  16. mommylovestosing

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    We do this, too. Also, I wanted to let you know that after the first time I tried this my daughter took weeks to try it again. In fact, it was the incentive of sticking mommy that brought her to try it again (she's 7). Let me explain what happened. We are new to this. We tried the pen for the 1st time one month in. So, I was only used to needles, but only a month's worth. The pen seemed SO MUCH easier and convenient. And it TOTALLY is, but, please keep in mind that the actual act of injection is MUCH different than with a syringe. My mistake the first time was not holding firmly onto the pen while I depressed the end. So, the pen pushed pretty hard up against her belly and then left a pretty big indentation where the needle went in from the plastic above the needle. I hope this makes sense. It freaked her out and she thought it hurt more (but it really didn't - the needles were 1/2 the length she was used to!). I promised her I knew now hoe to hold it right, but it still took her awhile to try again. Because she is older, she hold the skin herself, which really helps things so I can have both my hands free to operate the pen: one holding it firmly still(but not too far!!), and the other for pushing the doser. I hope this makes sense...
     
  17. czardoust

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    Hi Gina. We have used the Novolog pen with Kat since her dx, so that's been almost 6 yrs now. We get a replacement pen about every 6 months (free from endo). The pen only leaks when its worn out and its time to renew it. That b eing said, if you cant get a new one, then its a problem. But endo's usually give them out freely so that shouldn't be a problem. Novolog pen junior does measure doses in 1/2 units but the Lantus pen does not, so we have always used syringes for Lantus.
     
  18. KHM

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    I think pen quality varies, especially among the Nordisk products. My daughter is just about a month post-diagnosis and we are struggling with establishing a tolerable, reasonably consistent bg level. Our first NovePen Jr leaked like nobody's business...we had no idea what impact the leakage was having: was the leak from the dialed up dose or from insulin leaking around the stopper/measuring apparatus. When we're talking about measuring microliters here, small differences have large impact.

    We had two of the NovoPens so I tested the second one: it leaked less than the first but still too much for me to rule out its impact on her bg variability. On the other hand, our Levemir pen works just fine. So I use syringes to inject from her Novalog pens and give the Levemir with the pen since that's what we have. Truthfully, I'm much better at minimizing daughter's discomfort with a syringe and I'm much more confident about the dosing.

    I've found plenty of people with the same complaints in forums outside of CWD, too. Pens have a lot of appeal for many reasons but there's no reason to worry about dosing if you feel comfortable with a syringe. I can handle that until we're candidates for a pump.

    Good luck!
     
  19. BCmom

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    My daughter loves her pens. She uses Lilly and has two colours one for each type of insulin. She uses the pens for individual doses but still uses syringes for her mixed morning dose.
     
  20. cydnimom

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    We both use pens. My son uses the Novopen Jr. and I use the Humapen Luxura. The only reason my son uses Novorapid is that the Humapen did not have 1/2 units when he was diagnosed. They came out with a 1/2 unit pen a couple of years ago, but I never changed him over. I used the Solostar for Lantus once, but the cost was quite a bit more than syringe and no 1/2 unit pens for Ryan. I haven't researched the Lantus pen in the last year or so. Maybe they have 1/2 unit pens now??

    We absolutely love the pens, we find them way more convenient and easier for Ryan to use by himself. No drawing up difficulties. He started injecting himself when he was 7 at school - under supervision of course.

    Tricks to no leakage:
    1. Count to 10 before taking out the needle,
    2. Don't pinch up the skin when injecting (and the needles are so small you shouldn't have too pinch up in most areas),
    3. Turn the needle a 3/4 turn before removing.

    I also think that sometimes what you think is leakage isn't always leakage, but insulin on the outside of the needle after priming. Always prime - we do a 1.5 unit prime, others do 2 or 3.

    Jus my two cents...
     

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