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Pens vs. Syringes?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by ColleenL, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. ColleenL

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    I recently read that pens are less painful than syringes. We are using 8mm 31 G syringes and DS is afraid of the look of the pen so we haven't tried it. Does anyone have thoughts on one being less painful than the other?

    Thanks!
     
  2. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    For me, which is less painful depended on where I injected. The biggest differences are that you can pick different needles lengths and gauges for the pen, and that it's bigger and heavier. Depending on the pen, it may need more force to inject or not.
     
  3. MamaBear

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    Hi. My son uses the HumaPen Luxura at school and loves it. He says it is less painful and the dosing is more acurate than the syringes, since you don't have to do all that squinting. We have a new pen for home that we will be starting as soon as our vile of humalog is done. The pen lasts for up to 3 years. And needle disposal is easy and safe. Oh and we use the nano needles 4mm. It's also alot less to carry around if you're out and about. We LOVE it!
     
  4. MamaBear

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    Oh and if you do decide to use a pen, it's still a good idea to keep syringes handy in case the pen breaks or gets lost.
     
  5. Kaylee's Mom

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    Kaylee hated the pen .. not sure why .. the needle is smaller .. and now they have a new 4mm out so it is even smaller .. she would hide under the table when we used the pen!

    Crystal
     
  6. Amy C.

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    My son did not like the pen. He found it painful.

    He used an inject ease device with the syringes. This holds the syringe still while injecting. It works like a charm even though we don't do shots much any more.

    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_06_310.htm
     
  7. Deal

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    I loath the pen!

    You have to hold it inserted for a good 5-10 count in order for the full dose to be dispensed. Unfortunately my ds likes it so we still use it for novorapid. We use a syringe for his Lantus and pull the lantus from those disposable solostar pens.
     
  8. RosemaryCinNJ

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    Honestly I though the pens were more painful for Amanda..(when we briefly used the pen)
    Its not as quick as the syringe...and we got more leak back with the pen..and the fact that we had to hold it there longer (the pen) then with the syringe..not a good option with a wiggly one year old..(at the time)
    Ask for a sample pen from your endo to try to see if you like it...
     
  9. Jace's Mommy

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    I love the "idea" of the pen but we haven't had much luck with it. Sometimes we get a TON a leak back! But the whole concept makes being on the go a lot easier. I'm always scared that the vial will break when we are out and about.

    P.S. I'll thake advice on what to do about the leak back ! :)
     
  10. hdm42

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    We've used pens from Day 1 when they took him off the IV. We use the novopen3 (refillable) and the Lantus solostar. We use the 5mm pen needles. Most times he says it doesn't hurt at all.

    We've never worried too much about leakback. We prime the pen and then dial up the dose, pinch up the skin, put the needle in, inject, do a slow 10 count, release the pinch and remove the pen.

    They're sturdy and easy to carry around, even for a middle school kid.:cwds:
     
  11. Melissata

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    What you think may be leak back may actually be the insulin that you primed with still on the needle when you insert it. Shake the needle through the air to dispense those droplets before inserting it. Also, pinching is not needed if there is a bit of fat, and the pinch needs to be released after inserting the needle, but BEFORE pushing the button. Otherwise, you are trying to inject insulin through the pinched up tissue. It does take practice to remember to let the pinch go, at least for me it did.
     
  12. KHM

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    I hated the pens at first for their leak back, especially when we were having trouble adjusting her doses; it was hard to know whether our variability in bg was about the dose or the leak back. For most of our diabetes life, we've used syringes and pulled the dose out of the pen.

    Problem: our school is not allowed to use a syringe to pull a dose out of a pen :rolleyes: Kind of unbelievable. But at any rate, because of this we began using the pens again and I'm less unhappy about the leak back than I was. Lindsay says she can't really tell any difference in how the two devices feel but I can definitely feel that the needles on the pen tips are sharper and slide in more easily even though they're the same gauge and length...same manufacturer, actually.
     
  13. mom24grlz

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    Ashleigh used the syringes for the first 2 months then switched to pens. She tells me that she likes the pens better. She says they don't hurt as much as the syringes, plus with the pens she just has to dial the insulin amount instead of using a vial. Ashleigh uses 8mm pen tips. We've tried smaller pen tips (5mm), but she doesn't like them. She says they hurt more and she's more likely to get leak back with the smaller pen tips. I think she's the minority though, it seems like most kids like the smaller pen tips.
     
  14. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    Actually, the number one advantage of using pens that I see is that I use pens for the Novolog, syringes for the Lantus, and I have never ever gotten confused about which insulin I was taking.
    It seems to me that accidentally taking a short acting instead of your long acting is a very common and very dangerous mistake, and doing shots two different ways will help to prevent that.
     
  15. caspi

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    Cameron switched to the Humalog Luxura pen when he went back to MDI from pumping. We still use the syringe for the Lantus, pretty much for the reason that Jonah stated - there's no chance of a mix up. He's never complained about it hurting. It IS heavier though and I can see where that might be an issue for younger kids that are just starting to give their own boluses. Cameron says he likes the pen better because it's easier for him to bolus when he's out in public. I definitely like it for this reason -- way more portable than carrying syringes and a vial and then having to draw up the insulin, etc.

    ETA: He uses the BD Ultra-Fine Pen Needles, 8mm length, 31 gauge. The syringes are the same length and gauge.
     
  16. nanhsot

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    My son prefers using the pen for portability, but dislikes the pen needle, so he draws from the pen with a syringe. I like that we're not wasting so much insulin, with vials we always threw a lot away at the end of a month.
     
  17. KHM

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    I agree re: the waste with pen. I'm actually more comfortable with accuracy of dosing (using 1/2cc marked syringes) with syringes than I am with the leak back issues of the pens. Using pens allows us the flexibility to allow the school to administer via pen (although the truth is: they rarely do the administration) and I can do syringes.

    The other pen issue I have is that our Levemir pen doesn't administer 1/2 unit doses so we're always using syringes for those shots anyway...
     
  18. KHM

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    Actually our leak back issue isn't at all related to the drops from priming--I did a lot of experimenting including wiping the needle with a gauze prior to injecting into my leg with saline and would still see the drops on my skin and saline would still ooze out of the needle after the needle had been withdrawn.

    I found a forum *somewhere* (heaven forbid I should actually remember something...) where a lot of people described their particular challenges with pens (specifically the Novopen, Jr.) and there were several different problems described. Novo Nordisk does do some pen replacements but I just go with syringes when its convenient and deal with the tips when its not...
     
  19. Megszers

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    When I was in the hospital they used pens and syringes on me. The syringes hurt less to me, but they gave me pen scripts. I use the humalog luxura pen, and lantus solostar pens. When i was using the BD nano needles I would have alot of leakage and they hurt alot. I switched to the new BD nano needles and have never had any leakage, which was kind of surprising since they're shorter needles.

    Recently I just finished a cartridge of humalog in
    my pen and just out of curiosity took a syringe and took out the rest of the insulin in the cartridge and
    it was 10 units! Usually I would just throw away
    the cartridge when my pen won't push anymore
    out, but I'm going to start drawing the 10 units left in it and use it.
     
  20. pianoplayer4

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    I love the pens , I think they are some muxh more discrete and easy. we used vials at the hospital and I did not like them =( we started using the pens when we got home and they were soooo much nicer. yes you get a bit of leak back but if you hold your finger over the site after polling the needle out then you dont have to much trouble.
     

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