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Parenting and empowering a child with d?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Adinsmom, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. Adinsmom

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    Any tips? Last night I started to wonder if I am up to the challenge of parenting Adin in regards to D. How do I empower him and teach him how to take care of himself?

    When we left the hospital after dka and being diagnosed we looked at D care and responsibilities as no nonsense. We didn't question it or lament our new way of life, we jumped in with both feet. Dh and I later had private moments of grieving, but we felt blessed that we still had a son, who just happened to have diabetes.

    Adin is growing up :) He has a strong will and wicked sense of humor. He is also 3 years old and testing boundaries. He is still pulling off pods. Why? To gauge the reactions of those around him? Probably. Because he is just now realizing he is different? Maybe. Because the pod is there? Definitely. I put him on Lantus/humalog last night. I needed to do something to break the cycle. A sort of time out for pods. ;)

    But it got me to wondering am I up to the job of parenting diabetes? Like most parents I wonder on occasion if I am rising to the challenge of just normal every day parenting. Parenting takes faith and a bag of tricks but what should I put in my D parenting bag of tricks?
     
  2. 3js

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    I`m sure you are doing a good job of being a mom AND d-care:) Adaptability is the most important to me. Working around stuff/problem solving. Switching to mdi for a while sounds like the right choice right now, since your little one has discovered the pods, but cannot understand the importance of not taking them off! When I read things like this, I feel lucky my son wasn`t dx until 10yrs old!
     
  3. frizzyrazzy

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    Shelley - YES you are up to the task. No question. Think of it this way - it's JUST another thing for a busy toddler. Some kids constantly climb on the dangerous furniture. Some kids forever run away from you as soon as you let them out of their stroller. Some kids constantly HAVE to be on the stairs no matter how many time you tell them no. Some kids pull off their pods. He's being 3. This is what he's supposed to do at this age. And it probably has very little to do with diabetes.

    I would suggest that you just do whatever it is you normally do when you're teaching him. Either (what you did) remove the pod situation all together, or just keep applying and applying and applying. I know for me, when Ian was after the stairs, my solution was gating the stairs. Someone else's solution might be to just remove the child constantly from the stairs (my sil does this and it has worked). There is no right or wrong way to parent period. And there's no right and wrong way to parent D. Just do what it is that you already do.

    Big hugs. I can tell you're totally frustrated.
     
  4. Seans Mom

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    I for one, think you are doing a fabulous job. :D He's 3, he's inquisitive, he's rambunctious, he's healthy, he's daring, he's testing his limits and yours. Sounds like a wonderfully healthy, well rounded 3 yr. old to me. I have no doubt you are up to the challenge, and challenge IT IS. !!
     
  5. Adinsmom

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    Thank you for the replies.
     
  6. Mama Belle

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    Shelley, the fact that you made the decision to pull the pods for now and go back to shots shows just how up for this you truly are. You can do this. You prove it time and time again. Like all other things in life you gotta take it step by step. Some steps are more difficult than others, but the point is that you take them. You're doing good. :cwds:
     
  7. Tigerlilly's mom

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    Sounds like you are doing a great job!! The taking off of the pods sounds like an age related thing! I have a 2 1/2 year old and she takes off everything that she can, so I am sure that if she had a pod attached to her, that would come off too!! Oh the fun - especially the reactions from those around!;)

    Tyler was older when he was diagnosed, so I don't have any good advice on parenting a toddler with d. Honestly I don't parent Tyler any diffrently now than I did before diabetes came into his life. Diabetes is just a part of our everyday life, and doesn't change who Tyler is or what he can do. Life goes on for the kids same as before, they just have to quickly stop for a poke and prod every so often.

    Keep up the good work - and don't forget are kids futures are bright and holds no limits!
     
  8. andeefig

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    I am sending 3 year old {{HUGS}} your way, as I can totally understand the 3 thing....Max just turned 3.5 and is in full force "terrible 3's". He has many moments of brilliance but, boy o boy, can they test you!!

    I think you have a great attitude. Adding D to a toddler has it's challenges but it sounds like you are handling things well. I don't have pod advise, as we are on Animas and he's never bothered with it, but he is starting to dislike set changes.

    You asked about empowering them...Max will check his BS now (with me there of course) and I like to give him the choice to do so. I'm into the choice thing right now. I use the angle that there are somethings we have choices over (like if he wants to check his BS or choose what he haves for lunch) but there are somethings we don't get to choose...like having a set change. Just wondering if something like that would work with keeping the pod on....maybe he can choose where it goes and what sticker to put on it, but there isn't a choice to keep it on. Does that make sense? It works for us, but just like YDMV, YKMV (your kid may vary :D ) I think at this age, something may work one day and not the next, so we have to stay flexible which it sounds like you are.

    Good luck!
     
  9. StillMamamia

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    Yes you are! You're doing it right now!
    You can put believing in yourself that you can in your parenting bag;)
     
  10. Thoover

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    I recently received a dummy pod in the mail. I think it would be a neat idea if you could get one of those stick it on the same place that he has his on and show him that Mommy has one too. Reward him for keeping it on, he is only 3 but maybe if he saw that you had one on too, he would want to be just like Mommy..

    But remember you are doing a great job you are keeping him as healthy as he can be and alive with the daily routine of D care. Pat yourself on the back.

    Hang in there!!
     
  11. kkuncl

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    Shelley--I worry about the same thing! I have two with D and I constantly worry about empowering them. I truly believe that God gave us this for a reason and we are meant to do something great with it. I tell myself this whenever I think that I just can't (or don't want to) deal anymore!

    I try to encourage my children to not hide their diabetes. Everyone has stuff and theirs is just a little more obvious. Some kids wear glasses, etc. I also encourage them to share their diabetes with others. I think the mystery of it all is what leads to people not being supportive and kids potentially making fun. My kids friends are awesome. We have taught them all about diabetes and ask them to help them remember their testers etc. They want to help!

    We have also gotten really involved in the local JDRF chapter and there are so many opportunities to help for me and the kids. They love that and it helps them feel good about their D. Nevermind they have had some very cool experiences that they NEVER would have had and we talk about that. We have had literally a hundred people donate $$ to JDRF and walk with my kids each year. How awesome is that???? My kids feel so loved!!! Trevor, my older one, has come with me to other schools and talked about his diabetes and a day in his life. We are volunteers in the school walk and education program for JDRF. Kids love to hear from other kids.

    Most of all, we don't stop them from doing anything. Both are super athletic and my boy plays baseball, basketball and football and swims competitively. My my girls plays soccer, tennis, basketball. Everyone sees them dealing with this so elegantly and let's them know how awesome they are. That is empowering in itself.

    So my advice is to create situations where your child can grow and share and be proud of what he handles every day. The more we put it out there and live our lives to the fullest, the better my kids feel about their diabetes.

    Your little guy is still so young and I cannot imagine what that is like. Trevor was diagnosed when he was 4, but what I can tell you is that living mindfully like you are doing is only going to serve him the very best. I wish you the very best!! You are doing a great job!
     
  12. TracieandJim

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    I worry about this also with both my DSs but irregardless of D. Im trusting that since DS is so young this wont be much of a problem since hes growing up with it. DH and I try very hard not to make it 'too different' by pointing it out or hiding when we are in public. Things like that. Almost the 'I dont care' attitude. I feel like that will be the beginnings of confidence building so he hopefully get stuck on feeling different later. I have a lot of faith in him right now.

    I like Tracys idea of the pod for mommy to wear. 3 is still a very impressionable age. They still want to impress you, be you, do what you do... in fact, I would get a dummy pod and put it on me visible and not say a word. He will notice and begin to question you. You can say 'oh that? well Im ...fill in the blanks'. This way its not that big a deal and hopefully he will shrug and insist on where his own pod is!
     
  13. StillMamamia

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    Someone on here once mentioned the book

    'Parenting Children with Health Issues'

    Don't know if it's good or not, but maybe it's worth a try, if you're interested.
     
  14. Adinsmom

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    Thanks again for all the support and advice. :cwds:
     

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