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Out of Control Diabetes

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Type1DownEast, Sep 15, 2013.

  1. Type1DownEast

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    So I've had Diabetes (Type One) for over a year now. I know a lot about type 1 because my sister has had it her whole life pretty much. I was diagnosed at age 13 so I didn't even get to enjoy being a teenager without diabetes. At first my diabetes was in pretty good control because I was in my honey moon period. But once that ended it went totally out of control. I'm in high school and I can barely force myself to go to school. I feel like a failure and my BG's are high ALL the time. I feel sick and weak and I'm really struggling with depression. I feel like a lost cause like I'll never be able to control my Type One. I just don't know what to do anymore. By the way I'm on injections.
     
  2. mamattorney

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    I'm sorry you feel so out of control. You should enlist the help of your medical team and your family to help you. Being 14-15 years old, even though you can physically give the injections and test your blood sugar, you shouldn't have to shoulder all the thinking and calculating on your own. I'm sure you can find help somewhere - from you parents, your sister, your doctor . . .

    If you are high all the time, that says to me that you need more insulin. There's no right or wrong amount of insulin to need. Each person with diabetes needs what they need. Make sure you are checking for ketones, too if you are high all the time; that's important.

    Are you counting carbs, checking your BG and giving yourself injections every time you eat? Are you guessing on carbs all the time? If you are guessing, it may be help to go back and start over and be really careful with your carb counting, checking your BG every time and inject for each and every meal and snack for a few days, logging each time you check your blood sugar, carbs eaten and insulin given (both for food and for correction) and see if that helps your numbers.

    If you are already doing that, or if you try that, but you are still high all the time, then you need to adjust your insulin. It may take some trial and error, but you will need to work on determining whether you need more long acting insulin (Lantus/levemir) or more short acting insulin (Humalog, Novalog, Apidra) or both. Your doctor is there to help you - he or she wants you to feel good and manage your diabetes well. I'm sure you could send in your logs and they would help you make some adjustments.

    Things are never perfect with diabetes, no one is in range all the time, so don't expect that or get down on yourself for it. But, if you are rarely in range now, then being in range even 30% of the time will make you feel so much better, and if you can get yourself into range 50% of the time, you'll probably feel like a new person.

    Good Luck and please seek some help from your family and doctor.
     
  3. jbmom1b2g

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    I am so sorry to hear what you are going through. Definitly call and talk to your dr. Keep a record of the carbs you eat and how much insulin. Plus all you BG's readings. Then go over that with your endo. They will be able to adjust your insulin needs. You should also find someone to talk to. The hard thing is most of us don't know what you guys really go through, yes we see what are kids have to put up with, but we have no clue how they really feel. Try talking to your parents also and enlist their help, sounds like they have done this before. Hugs hope it gets better.
     
  4. ksartain

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    If you can, speak to your school nurse. They are great resources while you are in school. She will know what resources are available and can offer advice. You are not in this alone. All you have to do is ask. :)
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

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    I agree with mamattorney. You NEED the support of a team, especially your parents. My daughter is the same age as you, and there's no way she's ready or wanting to go solo on her management.

    If you can get your levels down safely, you will feel so much better.

    Were you and your parents ever taught to adjust the doses yourselves? We weren't, but my daughter and I read Think Like A Pancreas together and figured out how to do it.

    With puberty, your levels are going to be all over the place. We use both a CGM and pump to manage. My daughter wouldn't want to be without either one (and neither would I!). I've changed her basal rate almost daily for the last year to keep her in range as much as possible.

    If your sister has had Type 1 for a long time, there may be lots of new things to try that weren't available before. We have a scale that tells us carb counts: Perfect Portions Nutrition Scale. It makes life LOTS easier, and the more accurate of carb count we have directly translates into my daughter feeling better without being high or low because we guessed inaccurately. Her ratio right now is 1:8, so it leaves almost no wiggle room or we're at least a unit off.

    We do put a lot into D-management, but doing so lets my daughter feel good and not spend time feeling dreadful. If she were high all the time, I think she'd feel exactly like you are.
     
  6. Type1DownEast

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    Thank you, everyone! I have started taking my insulin like I'm supposed to and I talked to my school nurse. She was really helpful but now I've started having bad lows at school. Today my BG was in the 40s and I couldn't find any adults to help me! I was switching classes and was outside between buildings. I juust went to lunch and got juice but what would I have done if lunch wasn't the next period? (The nurse wasn't there) It was really scary for me having a bad low like that...:(
     
  7. MomofSweetOne

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    Do you not carry food for lows with you? Bad lows are awful. It is important to have your levels adjusted well and to give as accurate of carbs counts as possible if you want to feel your best.
     
  8. Amy C.

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    You can buy vials of glucose tabs that fit in your pockets to use for lows -- very handy.

    My son kept juice in his backpack.

    Think of what works for you -- you must carry a quick sugar supply with you at all times.
     
  9. TheLegoRef

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    My son carries glucose tablets, starbursts, skittles, or some other quick acting sugar with him. He keeps his diabetes bag on him all the time, but if he has to put it down (like for sports or something), he puts some in his pocket or his spibelt. It's a "rule" in our house that he must have enough sugar for two lows (32 carbs of sugar), even though most of the time 8 carbs is good enough. He also keeps two granola bars in his bag, in case he needs to eat during a fire drill or something. I'm not sure if you're a girl or a boy, but my son keeps his bag with him more than girls keep their purses with them.

    Great job trying to help yourself have better management! It's hard but it's awesome that you're trying!! :)
     
  10. mamattorney

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    I'm so glad that you've started taking your insulin!

    Keeping sugar on you is important, and now is a great time to pick some up at the store. My daughter likes Skittles (they are yummy and one carb each, so easy to count) and everywhere you look are Halloween packs of fun size candies like Skittles. I bought a few bags so she can just put a fun size pack or two in her bag and replenish as needed - easy peasy.
     
  11. obtainedmist

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    Smarties are fantastic too! One roll is around 6 carbs!
     
  12. Beach bum

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    I'm glad you are taking control of the situation and that you've made contact with your nurse.

    I've got to ask. Where are your parents in all of this? You say you have a sister with T1 also, so why aren't they stepping up to the plate an helping you in the same capacity they have been helping her? Has your diabetes team called them out on this? Did they work with your school to have a 504 put in place just like your sister has (I'm assuming she does since she's had diabetes for so long) so that on days you do feel lousy the school knows how to approach things?

    Yes, it's different with a teen, but you are still a kid, their kid. You are not a consenting adult, so until that time, they need to be involved in your medical care. They need to work with you to have a plan in place for you when you go low, they need to help you monitor your insulin doses, and they need to get you counseling to help you deal with depression.

    If they are not willing to help you, you need to go to someone you trust (such as guidance counselor, school nurse, doctor) to get the help you need and to make sure that they step up to the plate and help you. Anything short of that is neglect.
     
  13. ksartain

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    Ask your nurse to help you find a teacher to be your first responder when the nurse isn't there. I am the diabetic first responder for my high school. I'm pretty much in the middle of the school, so I'm easy to get to. That first responder should be trained in helping *you* with *your* diabetes. If you have a teacher you trust, ask them yourself. You cannot have too many people at school on your side.

    Also, ask your teachers if you can keep an emergency kit in their classrooms. In it, you should have a couple of boxes of juice, several rolls of Smarties or glucose tabs, whatever you use to raise a low.
     
  14. Type1DownEast

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    The skittles sound really useful with only being 1 carb each! I have some juice boxs that I carry with me that are like, 15 carbs each and I all so bought some gloco tabs to carry with me as well at school. On that day though I was totally unprepared. I had nothing with me! It's really hard for me to get time to check my BG during school because my scheadule is really fast paced. I've been doing it though! My blood sugars have been mostly in the 1 to 3 houndreds which is a huge improvment for me. I'm really glad I found this forum for support :)
     
  15. mamattorney

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    I'm so happy for you! You sound like you are working hard and seeing some great results. Keep it up!
     
  16. TheLegoRef

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    Good job :) You can do it!
     
  17. Ronin1966

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    Hello Type1DownEast

    What you describe has little or nothing to do with diabetes per se, that's just teenage years 101. They are never, every "pretty"! Ask anyone with some life experience if they would GLADLY be a teenager again :eek: not a prayer, diabetes or not!

    Others suggest the school nurse, your doctor, but frankly, for 95% of basic stuff I'd go straight to your sister first. She will get it, no matter the differences, the dislike regardless... she is your sister.

    Have you ever noticed that all the stuff we do, as diabetics, is never a blissful thing? You don't get out of bed in the morning dance around the room and go "...I'M SO *(*#@_(#@& HAPPY I'M A DIABETIC..." right?

    How bout a tiny vacation? Look up the term "diabetes vacation" and see if you can get someone you trust to take care of you for just a couple days some weekend? You forget, they cover your butt, shoot, test... they are a nurse, doctor for the entire time. You are just you again...

    Afterwards, then you talk about it. Not until.

    You get handed your own butt time and time again, no matter what you do to stop it, of course you're gonna crawl into a hole and cover up! Thats not magic, or abnormal, that's just wanting to live...

    How many times can you get knocked on your butt, and at some point just curl up. You need a diabetic mentor, someone who will watch your back, for no reason except like you they are diabetic too and that is a rule. We never let our own stay down, if we can help them! It is a rule you know?

    Now, the whole I cant go to school thing has lots of potential layers, where does your diabetes actually fit into that formula? Hyper conscious of people watching, staring? Not wanting to do this stuff in public? 99.9 percent of young people are so wrapped up in their own vortex, their own problems they wouldn't see a streaker sitting in front of them. Regardless... lets see if we can open the shades to your world just a little bit, let you know it will be all right, and you will have an incredible future.

    Come on, lets get you outta that bed... come on... lets go... :)
     
  18. Type1DownEast

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    I live with my mother and she does her best to help me with my diabetes. But I do do most of it myself. My sister is only 7 years old but she has had type 1 since she was 1 yr. old. I go to a counselor once a week to talk about my depression but the counselor doesn't seem to understand how serious it is. I usally bring juice boxes with me to school and during my 1st and 2nd periods at school I'm in the same buliding as the nurse so I can go right to her for anything and she has stuff to treat lows with. But during 3rd and 4th period I'm in a differnt buliding than the nurse and I can't walk a cross campus with low BG. Also I have the last lunch of the day at school so I don't get to eat lunch untill 12:35.. This is usally when my BG goes to low waiting for lunch.
     
  19. wilf

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    So which insulins are you using? It sounds like you're going low the same time on many days, so that is something that should be fixable by tinkering with the insulin regimen.
     
  20. TheLegoRef

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    Changing around your insulin would be my first suggestion too, but as a side note, my son carries around a spice container filled with goldfish or pretzels in case he needs just a few carbs to bump him up a bit. When we finished a spice container (the tall one, about 4 inches tall), I cleaned it out and we filled it with goldfish. That way they don't get crushed. That's for if he has a random low - it's not an every day fix, we change his insulin for that if it's a pattern.
     

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