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Omnipod- love it or no way?? appreciate your feedback

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by jkrjk, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. jkrjk

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    I am literally overwhelmed with the amount of feedback from all of you… THANK YOU!!!! I will pour through these word for word…. this will no doubt make me more than prepared for whats ahead. hope you all have a great weekend!!!
     
  2. swellman

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    I'm very curious as to why the Dr. would order this.
     
  3. virgo39

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    My now 9 yr old DD has been using the Omnipod for 3+ years. We chose it because it was tubeless (even though the larger pods were large on my DD when she started), after DD and I watched the automated insertion animation on the website, DD was sold, we thought the user interface was easy to understand for us, DD, grandparents and caregivers, and when DD and I did saline trials, were pleasantly surprised that it only felt like a rubber band snap.

    We are happy with the system. I like the newer, smaller pods, but find many of the additional confirmation screens (which I believe the FDA required) are not helpful. The linear IOB calculation works for DD. We love that she can wear the pod while swimming.

    We have had pod failures. They seem to run in spurts, but as of now, I don't see us changing any time soon (despite the fact that DH's insurance would let us get a new system fairly frequently).

    I wish that they would improve the PDM by making it smaller with a touch screen, better food library (would love a food diary), and the ability to "tag" boluses, etc. I wish the Abbott software that it works with had more flexibility in printing reports (I'd like to be able to export easily to Excel or reformat reports).
     
  4. StacyMM

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    This amused me this morning. :) It's quite the opposite in my house. My daughter, who wears a tubed pump, has NOTHING around her waist. She used the T:Slim clip to attach it to her waistband and the tubing is hidden in her clothes. She keeps her Dexcom receiver in her back pocket. My son, who uses a tubeless pump, wears a Tallygear belt around his waist, all day, every day. It's under his shirt for the most part but the lumps from the belt are visible and when he is jumping around (which is often) or has his arms in the air, you can see it easily. People think she's carrying a cell phone or an iPod and don't give it another thought but people see his pod lump and his belt and wonder what it is. For us, tubed is actually more invisible :)

    As to sports - my daughter only plays basketball. For her official uniform, she clips the pump to the waistband but facing in instead of out. The clip back is visible but not the pump, and we have a black clip (same color as her shorts) and the tubing is tucked inside her clothes. For practices, she wears mesh shorts with pockets and clips the tubing and pump inside the pocket. Practically invisible unless she has a shorter t-shirt on. We have more issues from refs for the medical bracelet (which is silicone) than any part of her actual gear. The receiver stays on the sidelines. My son's PDM and receiver stay on the sidelines for his games.

    For watersports, the pod is convenient. Like someone mentioned, though, it's much more visible than a small site. For girls, hiding a site is easier than hiding a pod...if hiding is the intention. My daughter isn't at an age where she even cares about that. And her sites don't fall off when wet, so I'd still give her pump the nod over his pods. We can connect and dose regularly to cover basals. I'm only considering having her wear a pod for the beach because of dealing with sand and because her Cleo insets don't have covers. And if she resists, then we'll just make it work :)
     
  5. andiej

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    We are very new to Omnipod use, and also started Dexcom G4 one week prior. My 11 yo son insisted that he would only try a pump if it is tubeless – so Omnipod it is. We started at the beginning of this month with both the pump and CGM.

    We’ve had three pod failures, all replaced by Omnipod. They were long beeps after one day of use. I found the customer support very good and was promptly sent replacements. On the last one, I was asked to return the pod for evaluation. Yes, we’ve had wasted insulin. Right now, he has low requirements, and we only put 100 units in, but still…

    We have to change every other day – Dr. orders to only use pod 2 days.

    We had one night of the highest he’s been (while diagnosed) and in retrospect, think it was due to a failed bolus after a new pod. (We’ve since learned about bolusing after a new pod to make sure it’s working.) I don’t yet feel we have the control we had with MDI, but I’m studying hard.
    We sometimes override the calculated bolus.

    We don’t use the PDM for BG readings. It reads low when out of range, and only agrees when in range. My insurance doesn’t want to cover the strips anyway, so we use Accu-Chek Nano and manually enter – a pain.

    His sport of choice is martial arts and he sometimes uses sparring gear – chest protector – that prevents placement of CGM or pod on the abdomen or buttocks. He is somewhat sensitive about people seeing it and prefers his leg. We use upper arm some.

    Oh this is lovely. Really interesting thread, early days for us but thinking about Pumps, our dietician was trialling an Omnipod and my son loved the idea of not having a tube. Though i have read lots of bad reports, that said I haven't closely looked at any other pump and maybe I would read bad reports about any. I think you sum this up beautifully when you say it's the closest to normal your son has felt, isn't this one of things many of us are striving for in these early days.
     
  6. Junosmom

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    Why Change Pod Every Two Days (ordered by Dr.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Junosmom View Post
    We have to change every other day – Dr. orders to only use pod 2 days.

    I called the CDE today to verify my understanding of why they recommend this. She said that their doctors order the pod change every two days for these reasons:
    1. The insulin is being held next to the body where it is warmed and possibly deteriorates. By the third day, they've seen some evidence that some people have poorer BG readings.
    2. The injection site and canula goes through the skin. More than two days in one site can cause absorption issues due to the development of scar tissue.

    She also said that some people will use up to expiration if for financial reasons or because they've not found deteriorating control on the third day.

    Thank you for asking, Swellman, because I needed to be clear as to their reasons.

    My reactions include:
    1. We change the pod when it suits us - and sometimes that is 2.5 days, not 2, though we try for 2 because of their recommendations.
    2. How is this different from the Dexcom which can stay for 7 days, or in some cases, weeks, with a canula in place?
    3. Would not Insulet (Omnipod) have done studies on this - which is why they recommend 3 days?
    4. My son runs "hot" so likely, he's one of the people that would degrade insulin held on his body.

    We have been working on the right amount to load into the pod, also. They'd recommended 125 units, but we've so far reduced to 100 and throw away about 30 on pod changes. Son isn't using but about 35 U a day right now, and it tells us when we are getting close. I watch it closely.

    Cathy
     
  7. swellman

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    Yea, I'm not a doctor so take this with a grain of salt but, I haven't heard those reasons. Of course if one suspects a site issue then they often change the pod early. Personally, these recommendations seem odd to me but, again, I'm not a doctor. Your question about whether Insulet would have studied this is spot on. I'm sure they did and I'm sure they have data on this. We've been in and out of a hot tub for an entire week and never saw "deteriorating" insulin activity. Your son doesn't more than a degree or so "hot" so I seriously doubt his temperature would affect the longevity of the insulin, again, in my opinion. I'm not suggesting you do anything differently, by the way.

    As for the Dexcom it isn't a cannula, a hollow tube where you introduce a liquid, it's a solid sensor wire. It's function is different and aren't directly comparable in my opinion.
     
  8. KatieSue

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    I've never heard of those reasons for changing early. The only one I've heard of is running out of insulin early.
     
  9. caspi

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    Yes. This. We're starting to come up on not getting a full 3 days out of the pods anymore. :( We DO have an RX for changing every 2 days and I'm grateful for that as it helps us have a small stockpile for when those pods decide not to cooperate and it takes a week or so for the replacements to arrive. ;) But we've never had any issues with warm insulin or scar tissue and my son has been on the OP for 5 years now and is always outside, whether it's cold or 100 degrees out.

    PS - Sorry, didn't answer the original post, lol. My son loves his Omnipod and even through the issues we've had in the past with bad pods, he wouldn't want to change. Then again, this is the only insulin pump he's ever used.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
  10. Junosmom

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    Sure, makes sense. And what about hot showers? Maybe I'll look for data on this.

    Ah, thank you for the clarification. Still learning, and glad to have the information.
     
  11. Junosmom

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    Well, that in itself might be a good reason for a dr. to say you must change every two days - because then you can if you need to because of using more insulin or pod failures. Insulet has been rather quick in my case, however, to get the pods to me in a couple of days when they fail. I wonder why the difference in customer service? Or, shall I expect it won't always be in a couple of days?
     
  12. swellman

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    IMO Do NOT expect replacements in a couple of days. I have never been denied replacements that I felt due but they do not come fast, of late.
     
  13. sincity2003

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    I want to preface this response with: our OmniPod experience was horrible...from the local clinician's response all the way up to their corporate office, so please understand that's where I'm coming from.

    DS reallly wanted the Ping. DH and I saw the Pod at our pump class and strongly encouraged DS to get it. He did. In 51 days, we went through 40 pods. Some were failures, some were leakers, but 80% of them were adhesion issues. And we tried everything that was suggested. Everything. And the final straw was the pod we put on and within 5 minutes it started screeching at us and said "Pod failed; no insulin delivered." My DS ripped it off his leg and threw it across the room out of frustration.

    We contacted Insulet 17 times in those 51 days. They didn't care. When I brought up the amount of insulin that had been lost, I was told to ask the CDE for bottles if we were running low, because that's what they get samples for. Um, no, they get samples for new patients to that insulin or the family that dropped a vial and broke it, or the family that lost their job and they don't have the money this month to afford their insulin. That was the last conversation I had with Insulet.

    DS started on the Ping 1/9/14. I was apprehensive about the tubing and it getting caught or whatever, but we've had no issues. For baseball, he wears a Spibelt under his shirt, and sometimes you can see it, but it doesn't phase him. Also, not a single site has fallen off him. as a matter of fact, I have to use Unisolve to get it off after the 3 days.

    I think the OmniPod is a great concept for adults and not so active kids (maybe), but I don't think it's the right choice for 9 year old boys.
     
  14. DavidN

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    DAMN! And my very active son and I thought he was doing just fine with the pods. Keep me posted with the Ping. We're going to need to know which pump to switch him to.

    BTW, should we be using Humalog or Novolog? Also, can 9 year old boys eat popcorn or is that just for adults?

    Thanks
     
  15. mmgirls

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    My very active 9yrs old girl LOVED the pod.

    But me as a parent not so much.

    To each their own.

    I will say to the OP, that "me as a parent" did not like the pod most likely because I was used to another pump and that if the pod was my initial choice that I would not have know a difference. It is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.
     
  16. sincity2003

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    I'm glad it's working for your son. No need for the snark, as I clearly said *I* don't think. I didn't say everyone should think that way.
    And while it's great that it's working for you, it didn't work for some of us and that doesn't make our opinions of the product wrong.
     
  17. caspi

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    Snarky much David? She prefaced her post by saying they had a horrible experience with Omnipod. She has a right to her opinion. Not every pump is right for every child. My son has been very happy with the Omnipod over the past 5 years and is very active. However, just because someone else doesn't have the same experience doesn't mean their opinions aren't valid. I'm not sure why it should upset you that someone else isn't happy with this product..... :confused:
     
  18. caspi

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    Looks like we posted simultaneously with almost similar thoughts, lol!
     
  19. sincity2003

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    :p
    Yes, we were :)
     
  20. swellman

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    IMO
    LOL ... been on it for almost 7 years since 7 years old. Other than the technical failures we've had, maybe, 4 torn off?

    Yea, you don't get a pass by saying *I* don't think. You're right, it doesn't make your opinion wrong but, by putting your opinion out there, it is fair game for disagreement.

    Fair game. It's a pretty bold statement for a site that has many, many OmniPod users and people looking for useful information. Her statement, while her opinion, is just wrong. There are many, many 9 year old boys successfully on the OmniPod.

    Edit: Perhaps this exchange could have been avoided if she were to have said "my 9 year old boy".
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014

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