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Now the school says that my kid can't test at her desk in class because they have children in the sc

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by thebestnest5, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. caspi

    caspi Approved members

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    Well said. And if a child has an actual phobia, I certainly hope the parents are getting that child help and not just expecting the world to change and revolve around their child.
     
  2. MorgansMom247

    MorgansMom247 New Member

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    This is the first time I have posted. Just reading how the school is so disrespectful of this child worries me in my efforts to get my son back to school. He was just diagnosed with type 1 week. The first thing his school did was ask for a release of medical information. This was after his principal told us we did not have to go to that school. I am seriously worried about my son returning to school. Seeing how people react to a child with insulin dependents Vs fear of a needle is not promising. What about my child? My insulin dependent child is fearful of needles and does not have the choice to not face his fears. It is ridiculous that these schools are allowed to discriminate so easy. Including my sons school.
     
  3. valerie k

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    NEVER ever give them a medical release. They need to talk to
    you about any issues, you can go to the dr if you feel the need.
     
  4. momof2marchboys

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    I would think that the school would be thrilled that you are wanting your child to test on their own in the classroom.
    I personally feel it is a distraction to the classroom when my son leaves the room with the school secretary each time he tests. He is only 6 and in K and our school nurse is not there everyday all day so the school secretary handles his diabetes care. I have been in the school when she goes to get him and it is disruption to the class when he comes and goes, kids get side tracked easily.
    I am waiting for the day he can check on his own in the classroom and just go on with his day.
     
  5. hawkeyegirl

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    There is no child with a 504 for a needle phobia in one of your daughter's classes. Are you supposed to believe that another kid's parents forsaw the possibility that their kid might have a T1 kid in their classrom who would want to test in the classroom (despite this school never allowing that before), and that this school, which is giving you all sorts of grief about normal, reasonable accommodations, agreed with those parents that a needle phobia is a DISABILITY as defined by section 504 and gave that child an accommodation saying that they wouldn't expose that child to needles in the classroom?! I mean, come on. What a pile of horseshit.

    In your shoes, I'd call their bluff. I'd tell them that for every classroom where there is a child with a 504 for a needle phobia, your daughter will go out in the hall to test. Oh, and you want to see the redacted 504s for all of those kids, along with the letter(s) from the doctor(s) (also redacted) confirming the "disability."

    I just re-read your latest post. I think they are allowing her to test in the classroom, and trying to save face with their "but if we get a kid with a needle phobia..." BS.

    With respect to your daughter's medical history, tell them your endo will give them a standard DMMP.
     
  6. Flutterby

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    Even if the other child DID have a 504 or an IEP one can not trump the other. They need to figure out how to accomidate BOTH 504s, IF the other 504 exsists. Even if the other child doesn't have a 504 (assuming this issue is real), why is it so difficult for them to send him down the hall for a drink at the water fountain?
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    The determination of whether a student has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity must be made on the basis of an individual inquiry. The Section 504 regulatory provision at 34 C.F.R. 104.3(j)(2)(i) defines a physical or mental impairment as any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological; musculoskeletal; special sense organs; respiratory, including speech organs; cardiovascular; reproductive; digestive; genito-urinary; hemic and lymphatic; skin; and endocrine; or any mental or psychological disorder, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities. The regulatory provision does not set forth an exhaustive list of specific diseases and conditions that may constitute physical or mental impairments because of the difficulty of ensuring the comprehensiveness of such a list.

    Major life activities, as defined in the Section 504 regulations at 34 C.F.R. 104.3(j)(2)(ii), include functions such as caring for one's self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working. This list is not exhaustive. Other functions can be major life activities for purposes of Section 504. In the Amendments Act (see FAQ 1), Congress provided additional examples of general activities that are major life activities, including eating, sleeping, standing, lifting, bending, reading, concentrating, thinking, and communicating. Congress also provided a non-exhaustive list of examples of ?major bodily functions? that are major life activities, such as the functions of the immune system, normal cell growth, digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive functions. The Section 504 regulatory provision, though not as comprehensive as the Amendments Act, is still valid ? the Section 504 regulatory provision?s list of examples of major life activities is not exclusive, and an activity or function not specifically listed in the Section 504 regulatory provision can nonetheless be a major life activity.



    The is no 504 accommodations for "needle phobia". None.
     
  8. misscaitp

    misscaitp Approved members

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    Under the working assumption that there is a child with a needle phobia (which can fall under a 504 if say its connected to OCD or PTSD) you can't exactly ask the student to leave the room as it takes away from their instructional time. Now the same with your daughter in this case it could be argued that she would be missing instructional time by asking her to leave for 10 minutes each test.

    I think the only way the school is going to even think reasonably is if you file a complaint about FAPE (Free Appropriate Public Education). You could say that by expecting your daughter to leave class for 10 minutes (3 test a day=30 minutes)for 5 second blood test leads to 5,400 minutes of lost instruction over the course of a school year. Allowing her to not fully access the curriculum in comparison to her non-disabled peers, thus being in violation of the American with Disabilities Act and The Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

    Now what I don't understand is that the school hasn't offered to give her a private corale desk within the classroom to go to when needing to test? This provides both privacy for your child and a "buffer" for the needle phobic student to not see blood. In this situation neither student would lose instruction time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
  9. Dan

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    I am so sorry you have to deal with this. I think your school is way out of line here. Just ask them to move your kid to another room. I doubt that two people have this alleged phobia.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
  10. virgo39

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    Don't want to derail the thread, but wanted to say that I'm sorry about your DS's dx. While threads like these are obviously upsetting, many schools handle a child with T1 appropriately. Arm yourself with information about your child's rights and the school policies and procedures. Also, be sure that you and the administration are speaking the same language -- I've found school personnel to sometimes use terminology that is a bit imprecise and confusing -- particularly when it comes to "releases". You should not have to give the school access to your child's medical records, but there might be some paperwork that must be signed authorizing the school to administer insulin, etc. to your child.
     
  11. thebestnest5

    thebestnest5 Approved members

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    Update: After speaking with two reasonable, caring school officials over this weekend, I believe we will be able to have the reasonable accommodations that we have had at other schools. I will update more when I know more. This has been difficult and the ADA has not contacted me (likely with the holiday) yet.

    Thank you all for your support, it has helped more than you know. My daughter read some of the posts and I know it validated her feelings. The saddest part for me is how this makes my kid feel--testing her bg is a normal part of her life and something she needs to do to be safe and healthy. It hurt her to have a school undermine her needs.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
  12. ozarkmom

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    [​IMG]
     
  13. ozarkmom

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    That's what I didn't like. They put the other child's needs above your daughter's.

    I'm on the same side as a previous post--this isn't your problem, it's the school's problem-they need to find a solution to accommodate all involved.
     
  14. funnygrl

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    So is this needle phobic classmate excused from home ec so she won't need to see a sewing needle? Needles are a part of life. They're needed to give IV medications, vaccines, and draw blood. The sooner someone gets over needlephobia the better. And want to know what the best treatment for a phobia is? Exposure therapy. So it would actually be helpful to this child for your child to test in class.

    Needing access to his medical records in ridiculous. When I had a 504 they just needed a note from my doctor with my diagnosis. That was it.
     
  15. sisterbeth43

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    I know needle phobia does exist. My SIL often passes out at the sight of a needle--either him being given an injection or someone else. But he has never once complained of me testing or bolusing in front of him. I think that most people with needle phobia are only upset when the needle is for them, but not always. But the real issue here is that the school cannot discriminate against your child because someone else might have a needle phobia. One of Reann's teachers did not want her to test in the classroom because, despite having 7 children, she got sick at the sight of blood. She told me when the year was over, she never once saw Reann check her bg in her classroom, I assured her, that she had indeed checked in that classroom, but was very discreet about it. As a previous poster said, If a child holds her/his hand in their lap, then no one need see it at all. The school is just trying to pull a fast one over on you.
     
  16. pianoplayer4

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    Okay, so I asked my mom (who was severely needle phobic until she was married, she passed out EVERY TIME she had a shot/ got blood drawn until she was married, and still hates the smell of rubbing alcohol)

    She said that it should be fine if you had the kid sit far enough away, and in and ideal world, having the kid test his/her own bg with the poker would be awesome because one good experience could help him/her conquer their fears.

    Also she said you have to understand that when your needle phobic, you really are afraid that you'll be attacked with needles.... so it's a tough thing to deal with.
     
  17. hawkeyegirl

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    There is no needle phobic child. The OP is getting her accommodations.
     
  18. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    And personally, I find all this theoretical accommodating of this phantom kid really demeaning of actual kids with actual disabilities (like, you know, ours) and their actual right to protection under section 504.
     
  19. MomofSweetOne

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    I had a friend in high school who would faint from just conversations about blood. It wasn't fun for her at all; at times it caused her to lose bladder control. I try to teach my daughter to be sensitive to those who may be around her while also testing where she needs to be.
     
  20. Mrs Puff

    Mrs Puff Approved members

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    I don't really have anything to add other than ironically, my diabetic child who gives himself shots all day long, passes out when he has his blood drawn! He does not like the big needle and the fact that it is going into a vein.
     

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