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Normal To Be A Bit Afraid Of The Pump?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by wearingtaci, Nov 28, 2013.

  1. wearingtaci

    wearingtaci Approved members

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    I am happy for Sophie that she got the pump she has been wanting since days after dx. She took it to Thanksgiving today to show off,even though she doesn't start saline until Monday,she is that excited.
    I however am a bit afraid of it. I worry about depending on technology to keep her alive and the what ifs of a malfunction. I know I would spot a low,if I'm awake. I'm afraid I wouldn't spot highs for hours(until a regular BS check). How do I go about convincing myself to trust her life to a tiny little machine?
    I think I'm worried about blowing through infusion sets while we learn and not havingg enough to last the month. For whatever reason iinsurance will only do 15 a month,and we can only get 1 month at a time
     
  2. nebby3

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    I think that's completely normal. You will get to love it though.
     
  3. wearingtaci

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    I do sort of love the pump,because Sophie loves it and has wanted one for so long. At the end of the day we as a family will do anything we think will be in her best interest and gibe her the most normalcy back.
    I have another question,from pump approval to when it arrived was just over 24 hours and with the holiday there wasn't a lot of time to do pre pump shopping. Does she really need a pump pouch? Sophie always wears jeans/pants of shorts. She doesn't like the look of the spibelt,or the pouches that look like little fanny packs. She is lukewarm on a tallygear tummi tote. Is there something available a bit more mature,or cooler looking. She did of course get a belt clip with her tslim
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    My mom would have called this borrowing trouble. :cool:

    Do you trust your car not to suddenly drive into oncoming traffic? Do you trust the 747 that flies you across country? Do you trust your gas grill not to explode in your face while you flip burgers?

    Pumps are safe. Period. There's no point whatsoever in harping about "Pump malfunction". Believe me, you are far more likely to "malfunction" in the delivery of insulin than is your kid's pump.

    What infusion sets are you thinking about using? Maybe people can send you some or your endo can get you some extra samples or just call your pump rep and tell them that you blew through 6 trying to get the hang of it and you need some to make it up. Not something to worry about :cwds:
     
  5. wearingtaci

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    I know you are right,but I do worry about her,and of course she is one of my babies and I would never want to do anything to put her in harm's way
    She was sent Cleo's and I have nothing to compare,even in my mind,but they seem easy enough to use
     
  6. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Well, all of us with kids who pump also seek to avoid putting them in harms way.;)

    There's nothing new or risky about pumping. It's a medical technology that has been in wide use for decades, highly regulated and thoroughly vetted.

    As to the infusion sets - Mish posted a great comment in a recent thread about the different types of infusion sets. Here http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showpost.php?p=851932&postcount=2 My advice? Try them all. Press the rep, your endo, any D friends but get you hands on as many as you can and try them on yourself. Picking the right infusion set can make or break a good pump start. Cleos may be fine, but something else might be better. Don't get railroaded into any one without knowing your options.:cwds:
     
  7. funnygrl

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    I agree that pumps are great. You'll certainly get used to it and grow to love it. It's normal to be apprehensive about anything new, but, as pointed out, they are thoroughly tested and used by tons of people. Have you considered adding a CGMS once you're comfortable with the pump? I think most insurances are covering them now, and that would assuage your fears of highs. Even if the pump does malfunction and stop delivering insulin you have around 2 hours before serious trouble. Sometimes more. If you're testing often, you should be able to catch is reasonably quickly, correct with syringe, and move on.
     
  8. sarahspins

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    Nope, a pouch is not required, and pockets work just fine for holding pumps :)

    The only benefit with a pump pouch or something similar is that they're a little more secure (the pump can't just "fall out" which is a benefit with younger kids or with some activities) and you don't have to worry about having pockets to put the pump in.

    She's 11 though, and I'd let her be the leader on how she chooses to wear her pump. Special occasions (dresses, etc) may be a little tricky, but they're not going to be deal breakers... there are enough different ways to wear a pump without using anything special, but you may sometimes need to be a little creative.

    As far as something like the spibelt goes, I'd suggest getting one to have available even if you don't think she likes it and may not use it - I have one that my husband uses more than I do, but since I'm local to the company I see them on joggers/runners ALL the time. If I saw one on someone I wouldn't assume it had a pump inside, since most people use them to hold their car keys or phone.
     
  9. rachabetic

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    Don't stress about running out of cleos. Tandem is amazing, and if you call them and tell them you went through to many sites during trial and error, they will I'm sure send you more. I got them to send me cleos with absolutely no problem when I thought I was going to run out of sites while out of town. oh...and I don't even use cleos, or get my supplies from Tandem, and they overnighted them. :D
     
  10. mamattorney

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    I think it's normal to be afraid of a pump - I was, but it's been great.

    We completely blew through infusion sets (once 3 in a day), but we still had enough to get us to the next month. I think I was able to order a little early, and my Tandem rep assured me she'd drive some over to our house if I couldn't get them from the supplier. So, don't worry. Someone will have your back.

    I got my daughter a tummie-tote band, not the original belt. The band doesn't have any velcro and I didn't get any plastic windows so it honestly either looks like a white t shirt layered under whatever shirt she is wearing or else you can't even see it if her shirt is long enough. It reminds me of those maternity belly bands - those tubes of stretchy fabric that you wear when you can't button your pants anymore but you are too small for maternity clothes. Those just look like you are layering a camisole under your shirt too.

    But pockets work, too. We just found when we started (still summer) that her shorts pockets were a little small for the pump, and her "sporty" shorts didn't have pockets so she needed something. It fits fine in her jeans pockets though.
     
  11. cm4kelly

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    Excited and nervous - normal

    I think any type of new technology is exciting - and certainly normal to be a a little nervous. But soon this will become a new normal.

    My six year old has had a pump for three years. We absolutely can't imagine being without it. It is very freeing-

    However - a few tips from my experience at the beginning.
    I agree with the other poster about trying different types of insertin sites. My endo pushed sure't's for us because he was small and they thought a double stick site would be better. He HATED them. We transtioned to silhouttes and I hated manual insertion. We then went to the spring loaded Quickset for a while, and finally ended up with Mios - they work great for us and we like the portability of it. Don't be afraid to try other options and ask people for suggestions.

    The first several weeks for us, we fought highs as we worked to get her pump settings correct. It is NOT an exact science and you have to try out some basal rates and bolus ratios. Your endo will instruct you to do lots of testing and keep records so that you can make adjustments. Be prepared for some highs for a short time while you work to get your settings correct. Don't throw in the towel.

    My husband wears his pump mostly in his pocket. Then have a small stomach case or something for outfits without pockets.

    You will love it!
     
  12. nanhsot

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    Yep! I had similar misgivings and fears, your feelings are so normal. You'll soon forget that worry, promise. Change is hard and change is scary. But change leads to wonderful new things, and this will soon be a wonderful new thing.

    It took a while for our supply to build up at first, but build up it did, eventually. Be in contact with your rep, ours helped a LOT. We can't go through tandem for supplies but the company we did go through made an exception on the 3 month thing since my son was heading to college. Most of these companies want you to succeed and will work with you. It'll be OK, better than ok actually!

    We're here for you!
     
  13. wearingtaci

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    She is getting a g4 as well,but we won't be starting them at the same time. I'm hoping to have her cgm-ing over the holiday break
     
  14. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    Totally normal. Sending hugs and love for a good pump start with excellent education, and great support from your team and from your friends online!
     
  15. GChick

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    While I'm sure it's A LOT more nerve wracking when it is your child... speaking as a person who has been diabetic for 31 years... and the first time being presented with the idea of the pump was 18 years ago... and being repeatedly asked by endos over the years "if I were finally interested" or "how come you don't want one" etc... mmmmmmyeah.... and not even considering it as an option up until this point... you can say I was afraid.

    But, I'm sure it'll work out for both your child... and hopefully me too :D
     
  16. missmakaliasmomma

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    PLEASE let me know if the infusion sets are an issue. I will send you a bunch. I have insets and insets 30, some contact detach but mostly the first 2. I don't know i f they'll work with the pump you got, I didn't read the comments or know what pump you're using.
     
  17. cm4kelly

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    Gchick - My husband has been a type 1 since the age of 8 typically taking at least three injections a day. We about a pump for years, but he never would agree. Finally, he MET someone who had a pump and got to talk to them. At the age of 36 he started on a medtronic revel. Change is hard - but today - 8 years later, he says he wish he had done it sooner.
    When my son was diagnosed we moved to a pump as quickly as possible -he knew how it helped him. Also - improved A1C's. He even started the Dexcom one month after he saw my son using his.

    You can do it!
     
  18. wearingtaci

    wearingtaci Approved members

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    We started with saline today. Setting up the pump was so easy. I kept getting ahead of our CDE, that realy says a lot about the ease of the tslim since I usually struggle woth technical things. Getting the cannula was a bit more difficult then either of us expected and it was hard on me knowing the insertion hurt her. I think we will ask about emla at the next appointment on Thursday
     

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