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Newly diagnosed 10 year old son

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by perrinsmom, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. perrinsmom

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    The song is "Praise you in the storm" By Casting Crowns. Its so true and will have you in tears if you are close!!!

    We've been so careful on the insulin so much so that we are asking the other one to check it. He's good about giving himself the shots on certain parts that he feels he can reach and the others we do. He likes getting his Lantus in his belly because it doesn't hurt.

    He's about 60lbs now, he had lost down. He's currently taking 6 Lantus and we are 1:30 for the carbs. What about your son? I agree with the mere drop. Its nuts how little it is and how much it affects his glucose. But, whatever it takes :)
     
  2. virgo39

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    Not a lot of advice here, just sorry that you are joining this particular fraternity (though I guess it's also a sorority). If you are going through a range of emotions ... Acceptance, anger, guilt, etc., that sounds pretty normal to me. As others have said, it gets better. My advice would be, even though you may find the responsibilities of being the parent of a child with Type 1 overwhelming, try to take the time to take care of yourself.

    My other advice is to get and read the Ragnar Hanas book on managing Type 1 as well as Think Like a Pancreas. Get a decent food scale and a couple of copies of the Calorie King book, and the app, if you have a smart phone (I also use the FatSecret app). I am also a huge fan of the erasable food storage labels... We have them on most of our containers and use them to identify leftovers.

    Hang in there.
     
  3. Christopher

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    Is there something you don't understand?
     
  4. sszyszkiewicz

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    My son dropped 15 pounds the week before he was diagnosed. He couldn't climb a flight of stairs. We had no idea. :( Our stay was 4 days. It took them almost 30 hours to stabilize him. He now gets 8 units of lantus at night, just recently adjusted from 10 because he was getting these crazy drops out of nowhere. His ratio is 10 to 1 and correction is 75.

    When he was first diagnosed and we were in the hospital, I was like "Ok, no problem. We can just stay here. 3 square meals a days. They help us count the carbs....do the shots....." Then suddenly we were home and doing it. The 'safe" bubble got a little bigger. Then there was a visit to family/cousins so we took the show on the road and the bubble grew a little more. A visit to a friends house. Sleepovers at our house, and recently trips to the diner and Chic Filet. Each of these is a little step towards getting pieces of life back that were taken away.

    yes the checking of the insulin.....its mandatory around here. if a single unit can drop his sugar by 75 points, we have to be really careful. For some reason his belly area hurts him. I don't think he has a lot of fat there and it goes into a nearby muscle. He does his own shots.....he prefers the legs. At night the lantus goes into his arm (this week it is his left arm). I do those because he cannot easily reach behind his arm where the fatty tissue is.

    I saw your one comment about how well your son is dealing with it. When people ask about my son I typically say "he is doing better than me!" if my son only knew how much strength he gave me that first month......

    Did they warn you about hot showers/baths? Apparently it is a bad idea for a T1D to have a hot shower/bath after a shot. the heat brings the blood closer to the skin and the insulin absorbs faster and can cause a low. So something to watch out for.

    Hang in there perrinsmom!


    That song was great! When you are weak, then you are strong. Such a paradox, but so true.
     
  5. hawkeyegirl

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    I think swellman was seconding your post, and the WTH was directed toward Dave.

    Kristy, ignore Dave. His advice is NOT appropriate for the newly diagnosed (or really anyone), and I've reported his post to the moderators. When he says his advice is "not the majority" what he really means is that not a single other poster on this board has ever supported his irresponsible advice.
     
  6. Christopher

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    Oh ok, it was hard to tell.
     
  7. mamattorney

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    I've typed and deleted numerous responses to this thread, and I can't quite figure out what I want to say except welcome and that things will get better. We haven't been doing this too long, but even at only 11 months in, things are running more smoothly than I ever though possible at diagnosis. Our education at the hospital was an excellent base, but I have really learned how to manage the day to day aspect of diabetes from this board,and the popular books recommended on this board. There's always someone there who has experienced what you are experiencing and can offer solid, practical advice. It's such an excellent resource.
     
  8. perrinsmom

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    Oh Honey, Dave has been forgotten :)
     
  9. Shopgirl2091

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    I wanted to send out my welcome too. I'm very sorry you have had to join us, but you have definitely found the right group for support and advice. My son just passed his 1 year mark a couple of weeks ago. The disease hasn't gotten any easier, but I have definitely gotten better at dealing with it. With time and experience it will be come your new normal.

    This group is such a wealth of information and wonderful advice, I'm glad you found it.


    Don't stress about Valentines, like an OP said let him have candy and dose him for it. There are really helpful lists of candy and carb counts out there, this is just one I found - it helps so you don't have to keep googling individual candy because Valentines sized candy doesn't always have nutrition info on the packages. This one is for Halloween but it still has some good carb info for fun sized candy. http://diabetes.about.com/od/nutrit...s-Carb-Counts-For-Common-Halloween-Treats.htm
     
  10. swellman

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    Yea, I don't want to pick a fight but I was actually agreeing with you Christopher. (tool)
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2014
  11. Beach bum

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    Hello and welcome. Sorry the club no one really wants to be in has added another member. You will get so much good advice and support from the families here, 8 years in and I still stop by everyday. The first few months-year are hard. Not so much hard in managing, but hard emotionally at times. You will most likely go through the process of grieving. But, I always say, the good days out number the bad, and when things are bad, I know I can come here for support as I know all have been in the same boat.

    Valentines day. Ya, just grabbing a handful of M&M's is completely different now, in the beginning we stuck with the pre-measured candies. LOL, that's the beauty of Halloween and Valentines, single serve candy! In time, you will learn to guesstimate, not ideal, but it allows for normalcy in your sons life. For other times just about everyone here will suggest investing in a good scale. Salter brand is great. This way, a good portion of the time you can be dillegent about carb calculating.

    There is no such thing as a good or bad number. It is a number. What's important is how you act on it, and learn from it. Like, did we give too much insulin, not enough? Did your son eat and forget to take insulin?

    Don't look for perfection, it will drive you crazy. Look at how you and your son can best manage diabetes on a daily basis. Trust me there will be days when you want to dance in the street with joy because he stayed in range. Other days you want to climb into a hole and pull the rock over it because things were so out of whack. But, again, learn from it, learn how to manage it.

    Hold onto your hat for puberty. It's coming and you'll see wackiness in the numbers. But, this too shall pass and with the guidance of your team, you'll be able to come up with a strategy.

    Don't limit carbs, your son was litterally starving and his body needs to get back to where it was. Plus, all developing kids need carbs for overall growth of a child.

    Good luck and welcome. It will be OK!
     
  12. Christopher

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    If you really don't want to pick a fight, you shouldn't call people names, it just makes you look immature.
     
  13. DavidN

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    I doubt it. Like most 10 year old boys he would probably love to have a big bowl of cheerios. But he knows, deep down in places that he'll tap in therapy 20 years from now, that if he even suggests such a thing, Daddy will get really, really angry.
     
  14. dpr

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    Kristy, we all know how overwhelming it is at first in so many ways, but as many already have said it does truly get better. Ask lots of questions. There is a wealth of information, experience and support on this forum. No one understands what a diabetic parent goes thorough more than another diabetic parent. Were all here to help each other. Diabetes is nothing we would wish on any one but at the same time it has brought us many new friends that will be friends for life.
    We really enjoy diabetes camp. The first one we went to our daughter couldn't believe all the kids there were just like her. And it's a great resource for us parents.
     
  15. hawkeyegirl

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    Considering the garbage that Dave spews on here, lord only knows what he has told his son to get him to prefer Bernstein's diet over a normal, healthy one.
     
  16. mamattorney

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    I was thinking the same thing. How would a kid know the difference between their parent telling them they cannot have eggs, or nuts or gluten or whatever vs. a parent telling them they can't have carbohydrates? He probably just thinks this is the way it is.
     
  17. MissionsMom

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    "My Fitness Pal" is an app on my Android Phone. We look up foods there a lot. We've learned that Dove chocolates are about 5 grams each, and my son's favorite Skittles have about 14 grams of carbs in a fun pack. Remember that since you're in the honeymoon phase, you will have more lows. You can sometimes treat them with things like Airheads (15g) or Smarties (6g per roll). We don't go crazy with it, but my candy-loving 10 yr old would definitely rebel if we tried to eliminate it!

    On the Lantus v. Humalog issue, we have actually given 6-8 units of Humalog by accident at bedtime. We noticed it right after injecting, and calculated the carbs needed to counteract it. He had fun eating ice cream, candy, and apple juice, but we had to check him every hour for the next 5 or 6. It's scary, but it's not the end of the world. If you make a mistake, and don't know what to do, call your Endo ASAP. They'll help you through it! I've also found lots of sound advice on this site, and I'm so glad you've found it early! No questions are stupid ones, we're all here to help.
     
  18. ksartain

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    I had to chuckle at this. My son had a night not too long ago where it took three rolls of Smarties and three boxes of juice from midnight to 8:00 am to keep his sugar up. Around 3:00, he said, "I bet none of my friends get to get up in the middle of the night and have candy."
     
  19. perrinsmom

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    I love and appreciate all the advice! Thanks :)
     
  20. Dave

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    My son eats just fine - he is very happy guy. Anyway, he's in charge, I never ever limit his food. If he wants a starbucks donut - go for it, we'll try to bolus our best. He manages his G4 and food intake during the day, I got his back at night and lock him in between 80 and 90. He understands the consequences of high blood sugar. Its not easy - he's sad about how tricky everything is and its hard work, but there is immense satisfaction for him knowing that his A1c is in normal range. He feels like he is winning. Its awesome. I guess he is really smart with that kind of delayed gratification capability - that makes it easy for me.

    My wife is a near master cook. We cook everything. Steaks, soups, chilis, almond flour baked goods, waffles, pancakes, quac, shakes...list goes on. This stuff is good! We all switched! We wont eat anything he cant, of course! Boy's blood sugar rarely rises over 110. His A1c is low 5. 95 mg/dL on CGM.

    All Im saying is that there is an alternative to feeding empty sugar/flour/fructose carbs and causing your child future complications from years of elevated blood sugar. Thats all Im saying. Its not garbage at all. And Im very grateful that someone quickly took me aside in the first few days and told me about that. When he went home after DX they had him on a high carb grain diet - insanity!!! I mean what nutritional value?! And at the cost of high blood sugars? There simply is no nutritional benefit to an orange, let alone a store bought sugar packed yogurt that possibly outweighs the devastating consequences of high blood sugar.

    Im puzzled that there is so much hatred ... Im not sure I get it, but the hope is that I can pass this approach forward to even one out of 100. Read Bernstein...look in any book store and check out the lastest science on eating grains...dont take nutritional advice from the government period - read Taubes.

    Really - you dont have to give orange juice, eggo waffles, etc. There are so many alternatives - just go to Costco book section! The word is out. Half the books there are about low carb/paleo approaches/blood sugar. What is it, one out of three folks is going to get Type 2 diabetes? Giving the same diet that causes type 2 to a type 1 child is unimaginable to me.

    You can keep the vitriol, but there is absolutely nothing wrong with telling a newly DX'd parent and fellow parents that a different approach exists. It can be successfully implemented. The science is there - research it for yourself, but look into instead of making '2001' jokes (which actually got a laugh out of my 10 year old because Dave, or course, is the hero.)
     

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