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new to T1D - stressing out about making mistakes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Serenia, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. Serenia

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    OK, I'm new here, DS10 was diagnosed just last week with T1D.

    I posted in the introductions forum.


    I did well with finger pokes and injecting insulin for the 2 days we were doing the diabetes education, but today was the first day at home and I am making errors and mistakes all over the place.

    Breakfast went ok - took a reading, paged the nurse, she called back and she gave me the insulin amounts to inject for today.

    Injected two insulin (one rapid and one long lasting).

    Gave DS a snack and then at lunch time I went to school to do the first finger poke. Took 10 minutes and 3 attempts to get a reading because we hadnt dialled the needle up far enough on the lancet thingy (what do we call these things that poke the fingers?) .

    Ds gets home from school and I take a reading and get him a snack. 2 hours later another reading, one injection of insulin and another snack for dinner. (cant do too much because we are out of food - very low income).

    2 hours after that I gave DS his bedtime snack but waited another 30 minutes before I remembered that we had to inject the second insulin - the long lasting one.

    I tried to inject it but it went badly and DS screamed his head off. Had to have DH give that one. And on top of all that - before the snack - I forgot to get a BG reading!!

    These 2 hour snacks are upsetting my routine and I think the food is coming far to close together!!!

    I dont want to be preparing food for every hour of every day!!!

    On top of all this his BG readings are still too high because he still has blurry vision.

    The nurse starts off with low insulin and they are going up but clearly either they are not going up fast enough or DS is eating too many carbohydrates.

    We havent done any carbo counting yet so I am not measuring. More diabetes education starts on friday.

    Maths was never my strong point. I am NOT looking forward to having to do all this counting and maths.

    I HATE MATHS!!!
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

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    It will get easier, I promise.

    You're on a much harder insulin regiment than most of us here in the States start on. With yours, snacks are required because of the way the insulin peaks. It's not a pleasant method. I would ask your doctor about switching to Lantus/Levimir and Humalog/Novalog. It may require an extra shot or so per day, but believe me, it's worth it. Snacks are not required; in fact, control is better without snacking between meals.

    We all make mistakes. All the time. There's a thread from not too long about about the worst mistake we've all made. I accidentally turned off all basal when reprogramming my daughter's pump within the last month. It took us 12+ hours to notice it, too. Amazingly, her BG didn't go over 200. I was fortunate. And the other night, in my sleep-deprived state, I accidentally turned her basal up when I meant to turn it down. I told my daughter the other day, "We should start a book of our bloopers." She disagreed, saying they'd all be hers. I disagreed; thus far the biggies have been made by me.

    I remember forgetting the carb book the first time out post-hospital and feeling like a panicked idiot. Now when it happens, we guess and know we can correct later.

    We have a scale that calculates carbs for us; I highly, highly recommend getting one. We get better accuracy and less stress than with measuring.

    You and your child will get so quick at mental math that people will stare when you can pop answers to problems out as soon as they give them.

    We did MDI for 13 months and then switched to pumping/CGMing.
     
  3. Turtle1605

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    This sounds so much like our first week. Running to the school 3-4 times every day. My biggest blunder was when I went to my son's school at lunch time and gave him 4 units of insulin instead of 4 half units. I could have killed him! Somehow, despite having not slept in 4 days and suffering from uncontrollable sobbing (I'm sure people thought I was crazy), I managed to problem solve quickly and made him drink a lot of juice to offset the overdose of insulin. It worked out fine. In my opinion, the most critical thing is to not let him go low. This actually means...try your best to not let him go low...because it will happen. The good thing is that I bet you are checking often and you most likely will catch any mistakes soon enough correct them! Of course, also know that just because he is high or low, doesn't mean it was your mistake...it is just the nature of the business (unfortunately).

    Another suggestion I have about counting carbs is to figure out a few meals and snacks that he enjoys and have the carbs for all of those figured out. After you are able to get some rest, then you can add foods a few at a time. It won't take long to get a hundred foods and their carb counts memorized.

    I also wonder if there is a way for you to find some snacks he can have at school that would not require insulin. At first, my son could eat up to about 18 carbs without having to dose so I made sure his snacks stayed under 18 carbs. Then, I just had to dose him at lunch. That doesn't work now...but it was great while it lasted! Also, don't forget about carb-free foods that you can pull from...sugar-free jello, cheese, lunch meats, beef jerky, pickles, sugar-free drinks made into popsicles, etc.
     
  4. Becky Stevens mom

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    Oh you dear dear lady! I hate math too:( and all the other stuff that came with the diabetes diagnosis. My son was on NPH and humolog at diagnosis. He would get a mixed dose of NPH and humolog in the morning, get snack at 10AM, get lunch at 12, get snack at 2:30PM, get another shot of NPH and humolog at 5:30 and supper, then another snack at 7:30. Lots to remember and keep track of and my son wasnt in school yet so I could take my time figuring it out. But I still made mistakes:rolleyes: Then I would go in the bathroom and cry:( But then I started writing things down. Kind of a standard operating procedure and I followed that for a time until I remembered. My son was on a set schedule as far as how much carbs he could have at each meal/snack and when he could eat it. Now hes on Lantus, one shot per day and humolog with each meal/snack. We find it easier now that way
     
  5. nanhsot

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    These first few weeks are so emotional, so tough, I can remember it like it happened yesterday. Your emotions are so close to the surface, the anxiety is HUGE, the whole thing is so overwhelming.

    All I can say, really, is take things a step, a minute, an injection at a time. Just do the next thing and you'll soon find that you are doing enough. Not one parent here has avoided a mistake, and some of us have made some doozies! You're not yet at the point of being able to laugh at the mistakes, but trust me when I say that you will see humor again, and you will relax again, and you will take this in stride one day and it'll just be part of your day, not even the most important part.

    As far as learning the carb counting, trust me when I say that if you can get on a regimen where you give insulin based on what is eaten (vs what I believe you are doing, which is feeding the insulin...regular snacks and all that), even with the carb counting it is SO MUCH EASIER. Yes, there is math, and yes, you will make sure a calculator is always within reach (I swear my home has 2 in every room!), but not having to force snacks and allowing him to eat according to appetite and need is so much healthier and easier that the math will be worth it. And truth be told, your son is old enough to help with this and in my personal experience, they are so much better at this stuff than we are! My son and I have a game where I calculate the carbs (literally, with a calculator according to carbs in the recipe) and he does it in his head, eyeballing the food on the plate and basically guessing how much insulin he needs...danged if that kid isn't almost spot on every single time. At some point it gets instinctual for them, and for us it just gets ordinary.

    It never gets OK, and it always seems unfair, at least for me, so I don't want to sugarcoat things. It stinks, no two ways about it. But it gets less overwhelming and more of a daily task rather than the focus of the day.

    If you want any advice, it seems to me that if he's still running very high, that you could skip some of the snacks at this point. Snacks are generally designed to feed insulin but if he's high, that means he doesn't have enough insulin, so feeding a bit less may not be a bad idea.

    Hang in there, you're doing fine!
     
  6. sooz

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    I am concerned about your statement that you are out of food and very low income. Is there food help available to you? What are your plans? I always thought Canada had great social programs but that is just based on assumption, not knowledge. Canadians can you suggest resources for food assistance?
     
  7. Serenia

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    DH is on a disability which accounts for the low income and yesterday was the day before a payday. We do get some money today so we will be able to buy more food.


    But cutting down on some snacks is probably a good idea. I will speak to the nurse about this when I page her today.
     
  8. Serenia

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    OK its the next day now and have just done the breakfast routine. Went a lot easier.

    DS poked himself, got a good BG reading, I did one insulin injection and DH did the other one. Both went well. Finally I am learning to jab and NOT to push!!

    The nurse said that his BG numbers will be high but should start getting lower as they gradually increase the insulin to cover it, but they cant bring the insulin up too fast. If his numbers are still too high by this time next week then they will start to be concerned.

    I feel a lot better now.

    But thank you for all your support and advice and explanations. I really appreciate it. :)
     
  9. VinceysMom

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    My suggestion is also to make sure you keep a log, log of BG reading, time of BG reading, log the time of each injection and how much you inject, which insulin you are injecting... then you will keep a log of what your child is eating... keeping logs will help you see patterns and will help you make corrections. If you need a sample of a log, I'm sure we can find you one here somewhere. When my sister was diagnosed her vision was blurred as well and took about a week or so to clear up...

    Sorry about the diagnosis, we are 2.5 yrs into this, my son is 16.

    Come back often to ask for suggestions or advice, lots of knowledge here.

    Kathy
     
  10. lgouldin

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    I would wait a bit on cutting out the snacks. My DD was starving after diagnoses. I felt like I was cooking all the time and she could not get enough to eat:eek:. They brought her bg down slowly and then she stopped wanting to eat so much and then we cut back on the snacks.

    In 3 days we will be at this for 1 year and we still make mistakes (just not as often) now its like oops, fix it and on to something else!

    It does get a lot easier in time.
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    To practice jabbing, grab a syringe, pull out the plunger, grab your arm or thigh or your husband's and just have at it. I didn't find practicing on fruit to be helpful at all. Breaking skin, especially the skin of our kids takes, I think, a bit of de-sensitizing.:( But the more you do it, the easier it gets.
     
  12. Serenia

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    The only thing I have to worry about is the extreme heat alert that Toronto is currently under - and will be under for the next few days.

    Afternoon recess was cancelled yesterday (too hot) so the kids stay inside. Same thing will probably happen today as well.

    I forgot to give DS a bottle of cold water and a cloth to wipe the sweat :(

    Will make sure he gets those at lunch time.

    We keep a log for BG and insulin already. Probably should start one for food since we will be counting carbs and as you say - getting to know the pattern will be helpful..
     
  13. nanhsot

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    For the post-diagnosis starvation, we didn't do any scheduled snacks, instead just provided access to no carb snacks and let him eat his fill. I wasn't referencing cutting out any no carb snacks but instead any scheduled ones that were meant to feed insulin. It sounded to me like the parent was on a set schedule of eating (vs starving kid).
     
  14. MomofSweetOne

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    On some forms of insulin, the child NEEDS scheduled snacks. Her son is not on Lantus, so he's probably one of those.
     
  15. DsMom

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    It's going to be very hot here too. I'm picking up my boys early..around 11:30, today and tomorrow, even though school is being dismissed around 1:00. They shouldn't even still be in school, should be on summer break, but our teacher's union went on strike TWICE this year.:mad:

    As for the mistakes, the best thing you can do is forgive yourself and accept that you are learning something new. No one is perfect at anything from the beginning, and NO ONE dealing with D is perfect at all!! We all make mistakes. It is stressful and nerve-wracking and you may feel like your whole world has turned upside down. But you will get used to it, and will relax, and life will seem normal again. You will not always feel like this...so keep your eyes trained on the light at the end of the tunnel...it will get closer every day!:cwds:
     
  16. Serenia

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    For the record, my son is on NPH and Novorapide - just so you know.

    He gets both at breakfast time, Novorapide at dinner time and the NPH at bed time.

    He has to eat at 8 am for breakfast, 10.30 for morning snack at school, 12 noon for lunch, 4 pm snack after school, 6 pm for dinner and 8 pm at bedtime.

    Today he came home from school and he was fine. Gave him a snack but didnt take a BG reading (it's not required). At 5.45 he said he was thirsty so I said he could have water - dinner was coming up soon.

    He ignored me and drank a glass of milk. His BG reading at 6 pm was higher than it was when he was in hospital with DKA.

    If he had not had that milk 15 minutes earlier, the reading would probably have been a fair bit lower.

    Can milk affect a reading that fast?

    We have not yet completed our diabetes education. Our first class about counting carbs starts on Friday - the day after tomorrow.
     
  17. MomofSweetOne

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    A glass of milk is 10 g, I believe (milk allergies herem so not something I'm used to carbing). 1 g takes my daughter up 4 or 5 points, so it would increase her BG between 40 and 50 points. I would be concerned if your son is taking the milk without dosing; what else might he have had, if he was significantly high?

    I imagine your D-team has your son running higher in case of honeymoon. Often the kids need significantly less insulin after the first couple of weeks, so it can be dangerous to adjust their levels too tight too fast.

    If your doctors won't consider Lantus/Levimir for a friendlier lifestyle (one that the insulin matches life rather than life having to match insulin), the best advice I can give is to look into pumping asap.
     
  18. Serenia

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    For the record - his 8 pm BG reading was much better.

    Keeping in mind that Canada uses mmol/L rather than mg/dL,

    His reading was 26 mmol/L at 6 pm (after he drank the extra milk), 21 mmol/L at 7 pm (I took a reading because he was getting stressed out and argumentative over something else) and back down to 18 mmol/L by 8 pm.

    When he was diagnosed and suffereing DKA in the ER last Friday, his BG was 25.9 mmol/L.

    Just some numbers for comparison. His target range is 4 to 10 mmol/L (its high because he is a child). Most D adults in Canada have a target range of between 4 and 7 mmol/L.

    I was told that the numbers are high because the D team are still trying to find the right insulin levels. They increase the insulin slowly until the BG numbers decrease down to the target range.
     
  19. sooz

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    Depends on the size of the glass of milk. Twelve ounces of milk is more like 18 grams I think. That would cause quite a rise.
     
  20. Serenia

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    That glass of milk has got to be the reason for the major blowout (argument) we had less than an hour later. He was totally unreasonable. I have never seen him this bad.

    Diabetic rages huh? I better watch out for them.

    Once he calmed down, his numbers dropped quite fast.
     

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