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New parent of T1D

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Tinalala, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. Tinalala

    Tinalala Approved members

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    My DD12 was just diagnosed Thursday with T1D.

    Question - How do you deal with attitude and fight when you're making food and calculating ratio units?

    We just got home today and already we've had our first argument about carb counts.
     
  2. Mish

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    Hi, Sorry for your son's diagnosis.

    Can you be more specific about what's happening during these times?
     
  3. nanhsot

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    As in, he won't allow you to count as he eats...or he disagrees with your carb count?? Is he resisting treatment or wanting to take over the counting?

    In those early days I simply counted and told him how much insulin to take, he usually did all his shots, I did the math initially.
     
  4. mamattorney

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    If there's arguing over the math I would just double check both numbers to see which one is right, but if he's arguing that he wants more food (maybe your plan is limiting the number of carbs per meal and snack) I would continue to follow the plan but talk to your doctor/nurse right away and see if you can up the number. Kids are REALLY hungry after diagnosis and they need to eat to satisfy that hunger.
     
  5. jenm999

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    Sorry to hear about your diagnosis. Great advice above. I just wanted to add that some defiance and anger is normal at the beginning (we are still dealing with it occasionally one year in!). I also have a 12 year old (non-D) and that's not easy either! :) Hang in there, we're here for you.
     
  6. suej

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    Sorry you are having to deal with this, it is hard, and particularly at the beginning, but it will get more manageable. I would like to echo mamattorney, the kids are so hungry at the beginning -they need to regain lost weight, and often need more food than perhaps the diet plan suggested. Hang in there.
     
  7. Tinalala

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    Thanks everyone for the advice. So far my daughter's doing great with the math and the shots. It's the food. She wants carb free snacks and we tried to find some today at Target. Cheese sticks, smoked sausage, ham cubes, (pre bagged by serving so we have a few on hand) but she's looking for sweets. Oh and she's not a veggie/fruit eater at all. Dinner was easier today with Mac and cheese and I threw in chicken, but she fought the broccoli.

    We are still a little freaked out cuz her levels have been in the 300s most of the day except for after lunch when it was 133. So crazy! I keep reading these posts so I know it gets better and I appreciate advice.

    So what do you give as a free carb snack?
     
  8. BarbDwyer

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    Hi and welcome. It does get easier.

    Cheese, nuts, meat, beef jerky, olives, a few veggies and ranch, boiled egg, peanut butter off the spoon. He drank a lot of crystal light. MiO and similar in the beginning. It was a novelty to him and it was sweet. My son doesn't really eat a lot of carb free snacks either. He eats what ever he wants, we count the carbs, and he does the shot. Unfortunately that means he skips eating sometimes (usually when he's on his own - lazy teen ;) because he doesn't want to fiddle with it. :( He eats no more or less vegetables than he did before. We haven't really changed our diet.

    My son's blood sugar levels evened out after 2-4 weeks and the honeymoon kicked in - which was nice. She is probably very hungry - which doesn't help the situation. That eases off a bit too. Does she want to avoid an extra shot or was she instructed to eat carb free snacks? Maybe one very substantial after school snack and a shot would help her be satisfied with a sweet drink and nibbling on meat, cheese, etc. at other times would help?
     
  9. jenm999

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    I agree with Barb. I found that my son wanted to exert some control after Dx and carb-free snacks made him feel less powerless. Also she's literally been starving so the urge to eat is HUGE. After a while things leveled out.

    Our go-to carb-free stuff: He loves sugar-free jello - it's his daily snack at school so he has one less trip to the nurse and there are a zillion flavors. That can satisfy the sweet tooth. There are also nut packs of dry roasted almonds that he likes, 4 carbs but so much fat and protein they do not affect BG. Trader Joe's has dry roasted seaweed which is good. He loves olives, pickles, cheese, and eggs (sometimes we make a scrambled egg in the middle of the afternoon!). Oh, and sugar-free popsicles! Good on a hot day (he was diagnosed in the spring and still MDI in the summer) and only 2-4 carbs. A nice treat that does not require a shot.

    Low-carb: check out Power Crunch. They are chocolate wafer bars made with stevia and have a ton of protein. He NEVER spikes when he eats them, even if we don't prebolus. Lots of great flavors (just discovered mint) and only 9g. The only downside is they are stupid expensive, like $1.50 each, but I don't mind because he truly loves them and they don't seem to have any consequences for BG. 9g might be hard to bolus on MDI but you could pair this with fruit and the protein would actually help slow down the digestion.

    It's so hard in the beginning, I feel for you!
     
  10. Beach bum

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    What kind of regimen is she on? She should be seeing lower numbers more than once a day. Make sure you keep a log of what she eats, when and how much insulin is given. Consult your team if you aren't comfortable with what you are seeing. Logging is really helpful though, we even do it now (this is our 2nd time to the rodeo).

    As for SF sweet snacks, we found jello with whipped cream was satisfying, slush made with sf drinks (ie. super crushed ice with the drink poured over).
    I would suggest she go to a dietitian to help with the diet. While in the beginning the low carb snacks are fine, they aren't the healthiest to have on a frequent basis. Plus, they get old fast. Maybe work with the dietician to come up with a more flexible eating plan where if she worked in fruits or vegs she can work in something she really likes. Biggest thing is you don't want a food battle to develop.
     
  11. nanhsot

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    Here is an old thread with lots of ideas:
    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes....etes-and-would-like-some-help-with-free-foods

    Those early days are hard, they are literally and truly STARVING. Sweets are of course hard, try sugar free jello, low sugar cool whip mixed into SF root beer, a few strawberries...

    What is your regimen? Do you adjust your insulin to your food or your food to your insulin?
     
  12. suej

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    A new success in my home is: 1 TBS almond butter or almond flour/meal,150g(7.5 carbs) frozen mixed berries, handful of ice, 1/2 cup water, 1 TBS xylitol (20g - 10 glycaemic carbs) made into a smoothie in a strong food processor but even better frozen into 5 icepops, so 3.5 carbs per icepop. Or makes 2 smoothies at 8.5 carbs each. But we are still in summer with temps over 30 degrees Celsius and it must still be cold where you are.
     
  13. Tinalala

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    Drs told us we're are insulin resistant so they upped our lantus. This weekend our numbers came down, but after dinner DD12 is saying she doesn't feel well. Fingers crossed she doesn't get the stomach bug.
     
  14. Tinalala

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    Well we are finally in lower numbers!! This week has been good. Just wish the nurse would stop giving her juice!
     
  15. Beach bum

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    If you prefer the nurse to give your child something else for lows, I'd suggest buying it and bringing it in. Sometimes my daughter likes to treat with peanut butter crackers so I got a stash for the nurse. I've also purchased jugs of glucose and fruit chews.
     
  16. BarbDwyer

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    Yay for better numbers this week!

    Does the nurse treat when she doesn't really need it or you'd prefer a treatment other than juice? I agree with just sending in what you want her to use.

    Have you had time to meet with the nurse to come up with a plan as to what number to treat at? I sent a sheet like that to school (which is way out of date regarding carb ratios etc) but my son is in middle school and just takes care of everything himself. It is all in his backpack so the decisions and treatment choices are his own. We were also lucky that his diagnosis was at the beginning of summer break so he had a couple months of practice before school started. If he doesn't have anything to treat with (or if, heaven forbid, he'd be to out of it to get his own treatment) they will give him milk from the kitchen and he has a bottle of tabs in his 'drawer' in the office with other spare supplies.

    My kid has been with friends a lot the last two days. He has not managed things exactly like I would (or maybe he has and diabetes happened :p) - anyway he's had more lows (because he's not adjusting enough for extra activity) and ate his weight in gummy bears instead of real food, which is just stressing me out. He has to stay home for a few days now just to get some decent food, lol.
     
  17. Tinalala

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    Nurse gave juice when numbers are below 150 before gym and then again later on. It was just too much juice in one day when her numbers were reasonably good. Ok below 150 but above 100 - we've been 250 - 350 for a few days. After the juice she came home at 275.

    Just had a total meltdown over first half a day. When will I eat or test? Can't go out with friends! Seems a little depressed. Got her settled, but might call social worker.
     
  18. jenm999

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    I'm sorry she's having a hard time. Unfortunately it's pretty common. Things will never be the same but you will find a new normal. There's lots of great technology that will give her independence while still being safe (I have a 12 year old daughter too, and though she doesn't have T1, I totally get how frustrating it must be to have so much independence ripped away just as she was starting to stretch a bit). Definitely call the social worker and reach out to any resources you have, but for us meeting peers and going to camp was paramount. I know it's only been a few weeks and you still feel like you're drowning, but when you can find out what support there is for her among other kids - camp, support groups, JDRF, random people you meet (I accosted a kid's mom a few weeks ago because I noticed her son's pump site on his backside at the pool - we have already gotten together with them and our sons have hit it off!).

    As for juice, and forgive me if someone suggested this upthread, but sometimes a juicebox is just way too much. We like glucose tabs because he can have just 1 (or whatever is needed), which is about 1/4 of a juicebox. Figure out what you and she like for lows and bring it to school. Give the nurse explicit marching orders if needed! My son also likes fruit leathers (Target has organic ones that are 10g and very yummy) and even something like saltines can bring up a low - not as fast a dextrose but if you're treating at 150 then a little lag is OK.

    Good luck!
     
  19. BarbDwyer

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    Oh goodness. Did your endo give guidelines on when to treat?

    We don't treat that aggressively and never have unless there was hours of swimming planned. My son would go way high if he drank a juice at 130 too.

    I hope the social worker is helpful and hashes out some treatment numbers that the nurse can use as a guideline.

    Some options that you can talk over with your daughter and the school (all different). My son tests before PE and treats if he needs it but he takes meter and gummies to PE with him. That way he has those items if there is an unexpected low and he doesn't have to start the hour out at 200 to be safe. Can she carry a meter and treatments in her backpack so she can test as needed and then see the nurse at specified times only? Are you comfortable with that? We don't have a nurse - my son carries the entire shebang, pen and all, in his backpack and does what he needs but he is 13yo and every kid is different with what they are comfortable with. The 'when will I eat and test' questions are so overwhelming at first. Big hugs to you both. It will all get worked out and she'll be able to go with friends etc. before you know it but that is little consolation for her now.
     
  20. Tinalala

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    Just spent a day in the 70s with a headache. Nurse wouldn't let her get on the bus since she was so low and had been given here juices throughout the day.

    Dr changed our ratio to 1:20 for meals and lantus to 16. She thinks we might be in honeymoon.
     

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