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Needle Stick by Staff at TDMP at School - Has this happened to your CWD?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momandwifeoftype1s, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. momandwifeoftype1s

    momandwifeoftype1s Approved members

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    I think there's a wall mounted one (I'm pretty sure) at Connor's school. I'll have to ask about the mechanism to unscrew the tops.

    I'm stuck myself with tons of needle tips recapping them. Oops!
     
  2. Marie4Julia

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    All of the sharps containers that we've used have had this. I don't use it, and usually just recap the needle (so much for practicing what you preach:D).The BD Home Sharps Container that we have now does have that mechanism, and I'd imagine most of them do. It's a hole about the size of the novo pen needle, and there's a little circular arrow on top to show you which way to turn the pen once it's through the little hole.
     
  3. momandwifeoftype1s

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    I'll be at the school tonight, so I'll take a peek to see what they have. If they don't have one that has that mechanism, I'll pick one up for the staff to use. This seems that it would eliminate the recapping issue. Good idea!
     
  4. minniem

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    If the sharps containers do not have the device (I'm not sure the wall ones do); I would still look at the possibility of having Connor handle his own sharps. As unpleasant as it is to get stuck, there's no risk if you are stuck by your own needle.

    I haven't tried the sharp container top to screw the pen needles off, but I wouldn't want my son's reusable pen needle to be stuck in a sharps box top that was potentially contaminated with other people's blood. But that's me, I just don't like it. Now, if it were my son's sharp box and no one else used it then I might do that. But not with a community sharps. There is a potential for someone else's blood to be on the community sharps container.
     
  5. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Good point about the wall mounted one being used for multiple kids. If it doesn't have the twist off top mechanism, I'm sure that's why. I'll talk to the nurse to see if she wants me to get an individual one for Connor or have him remove his own needle tips. Thanks for the ideas!
     
  6. purplewowies

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    I want to add that when I was eight-ish, I was having my finger pricked for some reason at a doctor's appointment. They weren't using a lancet as far as I remember, but instead it was a needle or something that looked really big at the time. I freaked out, and the needle scraped across my finger, then managed to land in the nurse's leg. They called my mom later and practically forced her to test me for blood-borne diseases. She wouldn't do it. Honestly, that was probably the right decision for me at the time, because another person probably would've ended up getting stuck if they'd have tried bringing another needle towards me.:eek:
     
  7. kiwikid

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    Unfortunately under OSHA guidelines you may legally have to have a blood draw done.
     
  8. Flutterby

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    The only way someone can be MADE to do a blood draw is through a court order. Agreeing to it is so much easier, and I can't see why anyone that was stuck on accident wanting to opt out of the blood draw, but people do crazy things. ;)
     
  9. timsma

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    Amy, I've only read the first 40 posts in this thread, but I would have had Tim get the blood draw done as well. Even if it bothered him, yes. I'd have just explained that sometimes accidents happen and one just did, and because of the accident, he will need a blood draw to put the other persons mind at ease about any diseases, which WE know you don't have, but SHE doesn't know that and may worry about it. I wouldn't have given it a 2nd thought. Now would Tim have I'm sure. And this is what he'd do now at his current age as well. I know this cuz I just asked him and he feels it would also be the right thing to do.
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    For me, the take away from this thread is that if this happens we should not let it become a personal matter.

    If the school, or the school district has some governing policy then we should find out what that is and, imho, keep the kids out of it. Abide by any reasonable request that isn't about "wants" and "needs" and "fears" but about the actual protocol because it shouldn't be a matter of asking a child to do the right thing under duress, but doing what is medically required. Just my 2 cents.
     
  11. Kazee6

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    We had this happen last year, luckily our school nurse has known the boys since before they started school there so she just notified me that it occurred and stated she felt confident she was not a risk for anything. I'm assuming that if she had to have testing done then she did that on her own.

    The previous year though we had an incident where Wyatt somehow ended up sticking himself with another child's needle that had already been used, a complete accident. The nurse was so upset and called me right away. I simply called the doctor and they put a simple lab test in, no big deal. My boys hate blood draws, but I think in a case like this if it would assist someone with not having to have 6 more blood draws then I would be okay with taking them. I think Connor did the right thing.
     
  12. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Thank you for letting me know how your family would have handled the situation. I feel better knowing that there are other parents who would have done the same thing in a difficult situation. I appreciate your post.
     
  13. momandwifeoftype1s

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    We are new to this school, so the staff member doesn't know us well enough to make that call. You are lucky that the nurse knew your family well enough not to report the incident. Or, that she left you out of the procedure.

    Thanks for letting me know that you'd take your son for a blood draw if needed. Hopefully, that won't happen to you.

    Again, thank your for taking the time to post your words of encouragement.
     
  14. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Feel free to take away whatever you want.
     
  15. timsma

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    For me the decision would have nothing to do with any policy the school has mandated, but what the right thing to do is, from one human being for another in situations like this. I wouldn't even give my child the option actually, regardless of age. If I were in the same position, I know that I would want the child tested and to get proof that all was fine (not all people are forthcoming about all health conditions after all). I think if we put ourselves in that lady's position, we'd want the same peace of mind and a few minutes or even longer of discomfort for the child is a small price to pay for that. Accidents happen. That's life. Sometimes we have to do things we don't like, kids included. We get over it. I don't think anyone would be making the child feel like they have a disease at all, just that they need proof that all is well and good for them to have peace of mind that they won't contract anything that they too could then pass on to someone else (a loved one even) if they didn't know. I think the world would be a much better place if we all did the right thing for one another without the need for court orders to make us do so.

    Just curious, if this had happened in reverse, and it was your (collectively yours, not just to one person, but all of us) son or daughter that was the adult caretaker (paid or not), wouldn't you (or the adult son/daughter) want the test done on the child for peace of mind? Or would you tell your son or daughter to suck it up and get those tests run on themselves over the year and deal with the worry for that length of time, cuz ya know, it was just a child that you shared blood with after all? Just because they're dealing with a child that has diabetes doesn't mean anyone should assume that they are clear of all other things that could be transmitted. Just my 2cents.
     
  16. miss_behave

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    At the hospital I work at, there is a policy for pen injections as they are such a high risk for needlestick injuries. Nurses are not allowed to administer insulin with pens at all. If the patient wants a pen injection they must give it themselves.
     
  17. momandwifeoftype1s

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  18. hawkeyegirl

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    Well, here's a thought. There is no objective standard of "right," as evidenced by this thread. I disagree with you, and we both disagree with the OP as to what was the "right" thing to do here. So it's easy to sit and spout platitudes, but it's not a cut and dried situation.

    I would tell my adult son or daughter that there was almost zero risk of this child having a dangerous disease, and when you multiply that by the miniscule odds of transmitting it via a pen needle, that it is certainly not worth traumatizing a small child over their OWN mistake. And that they should get tested at 6 months out or whenever and put it out of their mind until then.
     
  19. momandwifeoftype1s

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    I thought you were out at somewhere around page 14 of this thread :p? Yes, I know you disagree with me on how I handled this. Of course everyone has their own idea of what is right and wrong. I can't tell you what's right any more than you can tell me what's right. Right? But I do think this is a good chance to think about your own values and how you make decisions.

    I don't know what I'd tell my child if he were to get poked on the job. It was helpful to see how miniscule the chances really are. I didn't know those statistics until this thread was posted. I would give him the information that I know, and let him make his own decision.
     
  20. thebestnest5

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    Is this more about the fact that the OP stated that the child really fears blood draws (and that she involved the child in the decision)? What if a child does not have a fear or problem with a blood draw? -(And the parent does not involve the child)- Does that change anything for you? I am just trying to understand the strong emotions in this thread. For me, it could change things if I truly felt my child would be traumatized, but I don't have that variable to contend with personally.

    For us, it's really be no big deal--we'd do the blood draw to give peace of mind, if the (volunteer) person indicated that they were the worrying type and that they'd be worrying for the next year. It wouldn't be an issue about risk, as much as it would be about listening to the fears of the volunteer. I'd feel like the volunteer did us the favor of helping out (without expecting compensation for the help) and that I could at least listen to their fears, and work with them if possible.

    In addition, I have seen a school have a bad experience and have no volunteers willing to come forward, because the perception was that parents had been difficult to deal with in the past. Now, we overcame that, but it took us a year--now the school has volunteers to help the three children with T1D--but it took time to overcome the potential volunteers' fears of having to deal with parents if they didn't do everything to perfection.every.single.moment.of.every.day.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2011

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