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Needle Stick by Staff at TDMP at School - Has this happened to your CWD?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momandwifeoftype1s, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Thank you very much! I think so too :D.
     
  2. momandwifeoftype1s

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    For us, this is probably too late. But I think that is a nice idea for other families. I wonder how much this would cost though? Would an endo's office be able to request those labs? Draw extra blood for those labs? I can see an advantage to having it done in the endo's office setting with the poke already done. Interesting to think about. Connor had just been to the endo two weeks ago, so he was nowhere near needing his blood work done again. Thanks for thinking outside the box to come up with a different solution. See, this is why I posted about what happened to us. For other families to think about what you'd do so you can be prepared ahead of time. Hopefully, this was a fluke. I don't see many people chiming in to say this happened to their child too (which is good).
     
  3. momandwifeoftype1s

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    The slippery slope would be if a school district wanted to mandate this testing. I'd have a problem with that. If you as the parent wanted to have this testing done preventatively, I can understand that. I'm not sure if insurance would cover a test for "what ifs". I could be wrong. I'm not sure I'd take extra blood from Connor unless there was a reason, but hindsight is 20/20. I wish I could have had his that extra lab test done at the same time as his yearly blood work for diabetes- last time . But you never know ahead of time what's going to come your way.
     
  4. Lisa P.

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    I like Becky's idea of being preemptive, I also like it because people do get weirded out sometimes just at the blood factor and you could then assure them, nope, 100% certain no blood-borne illnesses. But I think doing it every time would get pricey.

    But I can't see how if you did the lab at the same time once you would have extra costs. You are going to do both anyway, combining them in one trip would not cost more unless you needed to go to different labs. At that point, to me, the school is out of luck -- either make it happen at my lab on our schedule or not at all. I'm sure something could be worked out.

    Which tests were run? I'm assuming Hep B and HIV, were there others? If a kid has Hep B vaccine already it can be discounted, and the other can wait. Even if the blood test was scheduled three months out, maybe do the blood test a little sooner and the disease test two months after the incident, that's a compromise. I would not want to keep the volunteer in limbo for a year, but she can be in limbo for a couple months when there's a 99.99% certainty there is no disease transferred anyway.

    Of course, it wouldn't work for your son if he'd just had them done, but for the future.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2011
  5. momandwifeoftype1s

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    It is certainly something to think about for other families. That might be a very good compromise if your child was close to the yearly diabetes blood draw. I don't know if there would be an extra cost for an extra lab. I just assume from past experience that anything extra costs extra (even Kleenex). :rolleyes:

    Yes, my son got the Hep B vaccine. I don't know which tests were run. I would assume HIV and whatever else is standard. I didn't ask many questions at the lab. I was comforting my son. I didn't even ask for a copy of the lab report because I know that Connor doesn't have anything. I wish I had asked for it though in hindsight - just in case this happens again (I sure hope not!), and we don't live in this school district. I think I'll call the lab today and request the results to be mailed to me. Hopefully that will work.
     
  6. Christopher

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    I agree. So if this happened again, you would not put him in the same position?
     
  7. wdhinn89

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    I don't understand, why are you badgering her? What is your intent? :confused: Bored today?
     
  8. Christopher

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    I am not sure when asking a simple question turned into badgering someone? The OP clearly doesn't mind discussing this issue (please see the previous 14 pages of discussion), she made a comment about it and I was just asking a simple question.
     
  9. momandwifeoftype1s

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    It won't happen again, because the school will now have lab reports to show that he does not have any diseases.

    I'm not sure if you're indicating that it was unfair of me to ask this of my son or if this was unfair for the staff member to ask him to get his blood drawn. I don't know if there was anything fair about the whole situation. It just plain sucked.

    And would I have made the same decision again? Yes. I would have, even with all the opinions shared here. Do you think I was unfair to Connor? Perhaps. You have the right to disagree with me. Do you think I was callous and didn't take his feelings into account? I don't know. Do you? I can assure you that everything I do is to protect my family, and I make decisions with the guidance of my family, friends and God. Do you have a better way?

    On the same lines, my younger son participates in TrialNet Oral Glucose studies, and he gets IV's every 6 months. I know I'm not the only one on here who's child participates. His blood is drawn every 30 minutes, and the EMLA cream does not numb him by the end of the 2 1/2 hours. He can feel the IV in his arm when they're doing the final blood draws. He's 7. He has been doing the study for several years, so he knows what the pain of an IV. He knows that he is helping his brother and his dad who have diabetes and other families. He asks me when he gets to go back for TrialNet. He wants to do it. He likes the attention and having the whole day about him. He loves the praise. He wants to do something to help other people. Those are the boys we have raised. I am proud of both of them.
     
  10. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Yes, I will ask that question.
     
  11. Flutterby

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    Problem with that is you can be infected at anytime.. so, those labs you did last year, or the year before won't matter anyway.. if your child has been vaccinated against hep B, then there isn't a problem.. if your child isn't a drug user who's sharing drug equipment, then there isn't a problem with hep C, or HIV, unless he/she is having unprotected sex, or getting blood transfusions that haven't been tested properly.

    There is NO mandate for ANYONE to get a blood draw, that includes those that have been stuck on accident.. its up to them to decide if they want that blood draw (which I would image most would).. and no one can make the other person get a blood draw UNLESS its been court ordered.
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

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    if your child has been vaccinated against hep B, then there isn't a problem.. if your child isn't a drug user who's sharing drug equipment, then there isn't a problem with hep C, or HIV, unless he/she is having unprotected sex, or getting blood transfusions that haven't been tested properly.


    I hate to point this out, but many kids are sexually abused and 90% never tell anyone, including their parents. The risks of disease are there, even in the younger ages. I admire Connor for giving his helper piece of mind.
     
  13. swellman

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    It's good up until the point he contracts a blood born disease. But, of course no one could possibly know when that is so if it happened 6 months later they might very well ask to do it again.
     
  14. minniem

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    Dear Amy,

    I agree with this post. As a health care professional I have had accidental needle sticks and they are no fun. I am also a worrier and would give myself great anxiety just waiting to have the blood draws done. It's not the blood draw itself for me, it's the anxiety. I would have been eternally grateful to the parents and the child for them to have the child's blood drawn.

    I think you absolutely made the right choice as did Connor. He showed maturity and empathy which are very good traits to have. Was this an unfortunate situation...ABSOLUTELY...but you both handled it the same way I would have. My DS hates blood draws and has full out anxiety attacks with them at times, but it's over in 20 minutes and he's fine. Knowing myself and how I felt at the receiving end of the needle stick, I would have had my son get the blood draw.

    As far as parents basically guaranteeing that their child doesn't have a blood borne disease, you can not do this unless they have been tested for that specific disease. I agree the pediatrician is not going to write a letter unless they have not specifically had the child tested. There is no way for the volunteer to know the status of the child. Some parents do not disclose or know their child has a blood borne disease.

    And mistakes do happen, even when we are careful. I know I never intentionally stuck myself, it was an accident.

    At my DS's school, the clinic aide (we don't have an RN in our school) trains him to handle the needle himself. He preps the pen (puts the needle on and primes it), she gives the injection and hands him back the pen. He then takes the pen needle off himself and puts it in the sharps. When he used the delica lancet, she had him load and unload the lancet himself. We now use the multiclix so it's not an issue now. But I do know she told me she was trained by the district RN to do this to help prevent accidental needle sticks.

    I commend you and Connor, it was a tough decision and I think it was the right one and would have done the same.
     
  15. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Thank you very much!
     
  16. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Thank you for taking the time to write how it feels to be the one who has accidentally poked yourself. I was trying to envision how it would feel to be that person, but you explained it precisely. The anxiety is what the staff member at Connor's school was most concerned about.

    I like your idea about Connor recapping his own pen needle. I'll work with him on that skill at home and suggest that he do that at school too. I just got some of the Nano needles, so those are easier to recap. Connor uses a Multiclix lancet device, so the lancets are not an issue.

    It helps me to feel better that you would have made the same decision for your child.

    Thanks again.

    Amy
     
  17. Marie4Julia

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    I'm sure this was a very hard decision for your family, and I'm glad that it all worked out as it did. It seems like everyone is happy with the outcome - and that's what counts.

    I do want to make a comment about recapping needles. When I was getting my degree in clinical laboratory sciences, we were taught to NEVER recap a needle. In the clinical setting, most needles have a safety mechanism to avoid the need to recap. At school, it's best that the nurse/volunteer use the sharps container to remove the pen needle. Most needle sticks would be avoided if they were simply not recapped. It's much easier to drop a syringe in a sharps container, or use the mechanism on the top of the sharps container to unscrew the pen needle so that it drops by itself into the container. Maybe you can train the volunteer to use this method? I'm sure she would be much more comfortable knowing that she may not have to go through this again... I'm sure you would be too;)
     
  18. Flutterby

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    And how many children are sexually abused? and how many out of those that are abused contract HIV/Hep C?

    The what ifs could go on forever.. MOST children won't have a blood born disease.
     
  19. momandwifeoftype1s

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    I didn't know that there is a mechanism on the top of a sharps container to twist off pen tip needles. Connor uses a NovoPen Jr., so the pen is used every day. Only the needle tip is disposable. Does every sharps container have a mechanism to unscrew pen needle tips? That would be easier and something I never thought about. We use a detergent bottle for shaps at our house.
     
  20. Beach bum

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    The red ones that are for home use, or the gallon sized ones do. I'm not sure about the wall mount ones (our school has these), as far as I can remember, I don't think there was a spot.

    I agree, not recapping and just putting in the sharps is a safer option. I've stuck myself with both a needle and lancet.
     

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