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Needle Stick by Staff at TDMP at School - Has this happened to your CWD?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momandwifeoftype1s, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    Well of course it matters to me how the child reacts to blood draws. My child stresses about them big time, and they are very traumatic for him. I'm not saying that I'd refuse just out of principle. If it could be done with a finger poke, sure. No problem. And if there was a real risk to the volunteer, I'd probably do it. But there was no real risk here, and I likely would not subject my child to a blood draw because the volunteer was being irrational. For me the fears of my child trump the fears of the adult who caused the situation. And I certainly would not make him look her in the eye and tell her no. I'd ask if he wanted to do it and if he said no, I'd tell her that I had decided against it.

    I was responding to timsma. You really don't need to respond to every post in this thread. I mean, if you want to, more power to you, but if you look around the board you'll see that no one else does it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2011
  2. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Wow! This is quite laughable. So now you're going to lecture me on board etiquette too?
     
  3. thebestnest5

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    Then someone brings up the question what constitutes real risk?
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

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    It wasn't a lecture. It clutters up the thread when there is a "Thanks!" for every single post made, but it's your thread, and if you want to keep bumping it into infinity, go for it. The multi-quote feature is a handy tool.
     
  5. hawkeyegirl

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    Obviously there is no objective standard there. In this case, with a child who is 9 year old, who was not born to an infected parent, who has no history of IV drug use, who (presumably) has absolutely no other risk factors for a communicable disease, I'd subjectively say that there is no real risk.
     
  6. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Okay, I think I'll do that. Because that's really my hidden agenda :rolleyes:.
     
  7. Christopher

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    Sorry, when you said the above I thought you meant it was an unfair position that your child was in. Since you put him in that position, I thought maybe you were reconsidering the decision and I was wondering if it ever happened again, if you would choose to do it the same way. It sounds like you would do it the same way and that is your right as a parent.

    For me, the reason I asked the question was because it seemed odd that the OP would say things about how traumatic it was for their child and the OP, how he was crying, the OP was crying, how it was the "worst day of their life", but then choose to do it all over again if it ever happened again. Just trying to reconcile the dissonance.
     
  8. thebestnest5

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    Karla, I hope you know I am not picking on you.;)

    I don't disagree with your presumptions, it's just that a volunteer might not feel the same way, and...Then, you have someone who is in a fearful state sharing that, creating office politics, and the real risk of people deciding it's easier to not volunteer.

    For me, one of the the best pieces of advice in this thread, would be to include this in an annual blood draw, if one has decided to do the blood draw.
     
  9. momandwifeoftype1s

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    When you mini-quote someone, you've just taken one tiny sliver of the conversation out of context. Hence the reason I dislike that function. If you go back to page 1 of the entire thread, I wasn't posting to ask anyone for their opinion about my decision. I had already made our choice. I was simply asking if anyone else had had this experience as a parent of a CWD. I thought it was odd that nobody had posted about it before that I could recall. I was searching the forums the day that the incident happened, and I couldn't find anything. I wanted to make other parents aware of what had happened with us, and to think about what you'd do in a similar situation. I think it's helpful to prepare yourself for situations that might arise in the future. What you choose to do or think of as "right" is your choice.

    Now, was I supposed to have responded to this post? I don't know. I thought that I was being nice to write back when someone is nice enough to take the time to comment on a thread I started. No? There are plenty of times when I have not responded to every post, and then I felt bad. I don't want people to think I'm not reading what they write or don't care about their opinion. I do care. Sometimes I'm just busy in RL. I've been home doing chores for the past couple days, so I had time to respond. I guess that's a No No? Tsk. Tsk. I guess I need to crawl back in bed with the covers over my head if nobody really wants me to post.
     
  10. swellman

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    To be honest and since it's already been brought up it is a little cumbersome when one is trying to follow the thread out of interest ... just my $0.02. However, bringing it up seems a tad petty.
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    You're being oversensitive. You've been around long enough to know that no one takes it personally if you do not respond specifically to their post, especially ones that do not particularly invite a response. And you've read enough threads to know that there is not a single other poster on this board who responds to every post in threads that they start.

    If this is your posting style, like I said, more power to you. But if you're doing it out of a sense of guilt or obligation, now you know that it's not necessary.

    Oh, I don't feel like you're picking on me at all! I think the risk portion of this is very interesting, and was pretty much overlooked in the first 400 pages of this thread. :rolleyes:

    I think the volunteer definitely did NOT share my assessment of the risk here, and the question is whether I indulge what I perceive to be her massive overreaction to the risk of the situation or whether I do a little research to back up my assessment of the risk and calmly present it to her as the reason that I wouldn't put my child through the draw. Perhaps her fears could have been assuaged if that would have happened, and she could have waited until the child's annual draw without losing her mind over this.

    As for the risk that people might not volunteer, frankly, that is the school's problem and not mine. That sounds harsh, I realize, but it's the truth.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2011
  12. Christopher

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    I was just trying to reconcile the dissonance....nothing more, nothing less.
     
  13. Lisa P.

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    Almost every elementary school child in America is now vaccinated for Hep B, even though the chances of an elementary school child being exposed to the risk factors for it are very minimal. Parents usually accept the advise to vaccinate for Hep B. It is, in part, an emotional decision based on the very natural desire to protect your child from harm even if the risk of harm is very low.

    Most of us have a hard time evaluating the risks inherent in blood-borne diseases dispassionately. We do our best, but it decisions like these rarely involve an objective pro and con list.:cwds:
     
  14. Becky Stevens mom

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    Amy, I hope you dont stop posting:cwds: I know this has turned into a long thread with many different opinions and ideas about what happened to your son. I will be very honest about my feelings with you, I havent yet but will now. Its not Steven's fault that he got diabetes anymore then its Conners fault. For me the whole thing smacks of our CWD having to pay the price once again, because they have diabetes. I feel that that happens so damn much!

    I honestly dont know how I would have reacted if it were Steven. He doesnt mind blood draws, in recent years theyve gotten easier for him (Thank God;) ) But I would have had a hard time expecting him to have a blood draw because a volunteer poked her finger and was overly paranoid of getting some kind of disease from him. That point really bothers me too. If this volunteer knew that she would be obsessively worried about getting poked with a childs needle then she should have declined.

    I also have an issue with a volunteer doing this type of thing. Unless its a private or religious school there should be a nurse there to care for CWD and the other kids. I realize that a nurse can get poked too, absolutely they can. BUT youve taken out the aspect of "Well, I should be grateful that someone is willing to care for my kid when he's in school" Yes, I suppose that's true to a point but then again, if there is a nurse there she is getting paid to provide a service that you and the rest of the school district pay for in tax $ and the federal govt pays for in its funding. So you dont have to feel bad if something happens to the nurse, Im sure you would;) but its taking out that aspect of the being grateful of the volunteer for doing the shots. At Steven's school no one has stepped forward and volunteered to ever assist him, fine! just fine then:rolleyes: they now have to make sure that there is a nurse there at all times.

    To end this lengthy post. You did what you felt was best at the time. Youre at peace with it, Connor is at peace with it and the volunteer is comforted now. She may or may not choose to do d care for any child now but in the long run, I think that might be best;)
     
  15. momandwifeoftype1s

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    I will not be responding to this thread anymore. Perhaps I am oversensitive. I do not feel welcome in this community anymore, and that pains me. I am done. I came here so I wouldn't feel alone in the experiences that I go through as a parent of a child with diabetes, and now I feel worse than before I had ever joined. I wish you all the best, but I can't do this anymore. It's not healthy for me. :(
     
  16. hawkeyegirl

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    I'm sorry to hear that. I hope that you re-evaluate in the future and come to the conclusion that one poster (me) commenting on the fact that you responded to every post in your thread does not equate to the community not wanting you here anymore. To the contrary, the vast majority of replies you received in this thread were complimentary and laudatory of both you and your son.

    But I often find that breaks from here and other boards where I post are healthy for me, and I hope this one is good for you.
     
  17. Christopher

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    Not sure why you would feel worse? You got a ton of people supporting your decision and praising your son for being so brave etc. A few people had differing opinions, but you will get that in life as well as on the Internet. But you have clearly made up your mind and want to leave this site. So I wish you and your family good luck in the future.
     
  18. Lee

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    What Karla and Chris said...

    Honestly, if you re-read the entire thread, why would you think you didn't get the support and compliments you were looking for? I guess I don't get why less then a handful of people saying they would have handled things differently is so upsetting that you want to leave? You had how many people telling you how awesome you and your son are, but still, you didn't get enough support? I am shrugging my shoulders at this one...
     
  19. StillMamamia

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    Breathe in, breathe out, take a break if you need, then come back. Always works for me.:D:eek:
     
  20. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    I didn't read through all 200 posts, but Amy, I admire how you handled it. Being new in the school system and area is a challenge at best, and having an advocate/volunteer in the school who genuinely cares about helping your child is huge. Glad that relationship will endure.
     

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