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Need help with Diet & Nutrition for a 5 year old. -

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by shelleybell, Aug 11, 2008.

  1. shelleybell

    shelleybell Approved members

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    Though I have been giving my daughter her insulin shots daily, I have been in survival mode over the last two years and feel like I am brand new to D. Please help me, give me advice on what your menus look like it, what are correct portion-sizes, and what do your kids drink?

    My endo, is not big on changing diet so much just focus on adjusting insulin. My endo says we are not ready for the pump either. So we do not carb count.


    Help!!???@@###%%^^&*((
     
  2. twodoor2

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    Shelleybell,
    Welcome to CWD. I have a feeling this would get a ton of responses if you posted this in the "Parents of Children with Type 1" forum. More people look there (hint hint. ;))

    Also, if you could add her age, insulin regimen (what insulins she's on), when she was diagnosed, etc, in your signature area (like mine), then more people can help you whenever you have a question or concern. This happens to be a very popular question. Some people say you can eat whatever you want, just cover it with insulin. However, I do feel that some foods are better than others when it comes to managing blood glucose levels.

    I'm a big fan of a diet low in saturated and trans fats, with carbs coming mainly from complex carbs like whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Complex carbs (many, but not all) tend to have more fiber and are usually not as bad for blood sugar. I try to eliminate anything with corn syrup or High Fructose corn syrup, or other high glycemic index foods. I stay away from all commercially processed foods.

    My daughter is also particularly sensitive to saturated and trans fats so I have to keep her away from those as well. They cause carbs to digest very slowly and the insulin has past it's peak effectiveness by the time the glucose enters the bloodstream. This causes spikes for many diabetics.
     
  3. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    I'm going to let the other parents scream about your endo. Carb counting learned early will help with all your adjustments. A good healthy diet with insulin to match is what works. Her are some excellant books I'd advise you to purchase.

    #1 The "bible" of childhood diabetes, "Understanding Insulin Dependent Diabetes" (aka the Pink Panther book) by Peter Chase, MD of the Barbara Davis Center at the Univ. of Colorado:

    http://www.uchsc.edu/misc/diabetes/ud11.html

    Emtire text is available online at that site. Softbound copy may be ordered, if desired.

    #2 Sweet Kids: How to Balance Diabetes Control & Good Nutrition with Family Peace, Second
    Edition by Betty Page Brackenridge, MS, RD, CDE & Richard R. Rubin, PhD, CDE. Published by the
    American Diabetes Association, 2002. 250 pages. Softcover. US$16.95. ISBN 1580401244.

    Brackenridge and Rubin provide exceptionally good and detailed advice for managing what is
    perhaps the most important part of your child's diabetes care: diet. How many of you parents
    of kids with diabetes have struggled at meal time? Probably all of you. The authors' advice is
    simple: adjust your child's insulin to cover their dietary intake, not the other way around. This
    is exactly opposite from what many parents are taught, but makes considerable sense. There's
    so much outstanding advice and guidance in this book that a review can hardly do it justice.

    The breadth and depth of dietary information and advice in this book is second to none. You'll find help on
    nutrition; growth; snacks; coping with sports and eating disorders; special advice for toddlers, school-age
    kids and teens; and how to avoid parental burnout.


    Order Sweet Kids from Amazon.com

    #4 http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/articles/High_Blood_Glucose/Strike_the_Spike

    Hope some of thses are helpful
     
  4. lil'Man'sMom

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    We were told not to adjust his diet because of diabetes but to us the insulin with his "regular"diet. I am finding, approaching the 1 year mark and coming out of the honeymoon, that this is not going to work for us long term.

    Manning is also very sensitive to fats and processed foods.

    Marsha what is a typical menu (specifics if you would) that you feed Elizabeth? Are there certain foods that you do not allow and what do you use for alternatives?

    edit to add: look at my avatar, Manning is about to lobster, corn on the cob, grilled pots and a little steak.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2008
  5. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    yummmmmmmmmmyyyyyyyyyyy
     
  6. twodoor2

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    The foods that I do not really allow are anything with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or trans fat. I know some meat has some saturated fat, as well as butter, but I keep that to a minimum. I also try to avoid chemical laden processed foods.

    This thread is extremely informative as to nutritious food choices.

    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=16091

    You also don't have to give up yummy things to eat well. For example, I give her chocolate and cookies, as long as they're made up of whole and natural ingredients. I also prefer if they're sweetened with evaporated cane juice vs regular sugar, but I absolutely flat out refuse to give her HFCS.

    I do try to limit dairy fat since it also causes fat spikes and my pediatrican stated that more and more studies indicate it's a cause for heart disease, which can start if it's given in childhood. I also do limit her carbs to a reasonable, but healthy amount.

    In my experience, I do find that an over abundance of carbs is more difficult for management. I do not do low carb, but I do not do high carb either.;)

    Here's a typical menu for the day - mind you I'm not the best cook, but I try.:eek:

    Breakfast: organic brand oatmeal with a dallop of yogurt, a stevia sweetened protein shake made with kefur, some berries. ~30 to 35 carbs

    lunch: Turkey burger, broccoli, non sweetened applesauce and multi-grain bread. ~ 40 carbs

    snack: 1/2 Organic cliff z-bar granola bar for kids ~ 10 carbs

    dinner: Seafood stew with broccoli (yes, she likes this!!), flaxseed zucchini muffin, more fruit. ~ 30 carbs

    snack: raw carrots and a cookie.:) ~ 20 carbs
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2008
  7. miss_behave

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    I'm confused as to what you mean about not carb counting. It is not specific to pumping, on any insulins you need to be able to carb count to match insulin to the food you eat- even if you are on a meal plan/older insulin regime. How do you dose insulin in your daughter?

    If you are on a basal/bolus regime (Lantus/Levemir & Humalog/Novo) your daughter should be able to eat like any other child her age does, you simply match the insulin to the carbs she eats. There is no need for any type of food restrictions.

    Lastly, if your daughter is on NPH/pre-mixed insulin/Regular, I suggest you ask you endo about switching to basal/bolus & carb counting. Not only has it been proven by many studies to be the most intensive way to treat diabetes, it also makes life a lot more flexible and unrestricted. The above insulins are older and not used as often anymore and have a lot of downsides compared to newer treatments. If your endo won't allow you to switch, I say run, don't walk to a new endo. He is obviously in the dark ages.
     
  8. shelleybell

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    Soooooo much to learn


    Miss Behave, Thank you so much for the info.
    Right now, We are matching the insulin to the amount of carbs she eats as well as the Lantus to cover her 24 hours and we are mixing NPH with Humalog in the morning for bfast. She still has such highs and goes low too and I am trying to figure out why so much fluctuation while on insulin, is it normal for her BS to be in the 300's and also go below 70 while on all of this insulin, regardless of what she eats?
     
  9. shelleybell

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    Thx for all the great info. and meals and snacks to try. Right now we are trying new ingredients and new recipies and I'm learning what others might be sensitive too so I can also learn to stay away from them and see if I can see a difference in her BS levels. It has been almost two years now and I want to get her BS levels more under control but it seems that any type of sugar whether it be cookies or grapes send her spiking. And then the management of her activity on top of that. It is really hard, is it normal for me to still be struggling this much after almost two years? I feel like I can't get it.

    We are matching the insulin to the amount of carbs she eats as well as the Lantus to cover her 24 hours and we are mixing NPH with Humalog in the morning for bfast. She still has such highs and goes low too and I am trying to figure out why so much fluctuation while on insulin, is it normal for her BS to be in the 300's and also go below 70 while on all of this insulin, regardless of what she eats?

    I am sorry for asking so many questions still after you responded to mine, you can forward it to someone you know or just tell to buzz off if you want too..thnx again Marsha.
     
  10. shelleybell

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    Thank you for sharing and for your info..
     
  11. twodoor2

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    Don't ever be sorry for asking too many questions!:) That's what CWD is for. You should ask lots and lots of questions, the more, the better.;):D
     
  12. miss_behave

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    Unfortunately this is the nature of diabetes. We cannot be a perfect substitute for a working pancreas. You will see highs and lows, sometimes you know why, sometimes you can only guess!
     

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