- advertisement -

My sons feet tingle

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Austins mom, Mar 5, 2014.

  1. Austins mom

    Austins mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    My 8 yr old sons feet tingle when his blood sugar gets really low :( He was just diagnosed a year ago, isn't it to soon for feet problems?
     
  2. Megnyc

    Megnyc Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,373
    My legs and feet feel weak and shaky when I am really low (say under 40). I often realize I am low when I stand up and realize that my legs don't feel normal. That is probably what he means when he says his feet tingle. I think it is pretty common but if you are concerned I am sure you could talk to his pediatrician or endo.

    ETA: When I was younger that weird feeling was my only symptom of lows. I would often be walking with my parents and say, "My feet are sleepy from walking." That was really the only way at the age of 11 I could describe that feeling and since it felt somewhat like my feet were "falling asleep" that is what I would say. After a while we realized that meant I was low and it was actually a really good signal for me to know I need to stop and check my blood sugar.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  3. Mish

    Mish Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,393
    It's just his own unique low symptom. Nothing to worry about. :) Encourage him to recognize it.

    "foot problems' in young even moderately well controlled kids is pretty much unheard of. It's usually a result of long term nerve damage that you'd see in many older type 2 people or some very longer term type 1s. But nothing to worry about in an otherwise healthy 7 year old. :)
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    To the OP: Personally I would not ignore it. I would have a trained medical professional assess him. We (and you) have no idea what is going on with him. It may be a symptom of something totally unrelated to diabetes. It is most likely nothing serious, but I would not just ignore it.

    Good luck
     
  5. MamaC

    MamaC Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Messages:
    5,292
    If this is really bothering you, despite Meg relating something similar, get in touch with your son's doctor and share your concerns. Personally, I wouldn't go looking for trouble.
     
  6. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Since it only happens when he's low, I personally wouldn't worry about it. Ask your son's endo next time you're in if it makes you feel better, but if it only occurs when he's low...it probably means that he's low.
     
  7. andiej

    andiej Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2013
    Messages:
    193
    To give you peace of mind it might be worth you asking a medical proffessional. My 10 year old describes feeling low as a tingling in his tummy.
     
  8. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,384
    There's no way that diabetic neuropathy could have occurred this soon, especially with even a modicum of BG control.
     
  9. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Would you mind letting us know where you got your medical degree? (Just kidding).

    But in all seriousness, I think it is unwise to make definitive statements like this without knowing what is going on with her child. I think we can all agree that it is unlikely this is related to diabetic neuropathy, but we really don't know what is going on. Depending on how long a persons diabetes goes undiagnosed, there are no rules that say you can't experience complications after a year or so.

    So the best advice we can logically give is to have him evaluated by a trained medical professional to get to the bottom of this. Hopefully it is nothing serious.
     
  10. tammy82

    tammy82 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    Messages:
    169
    Maybe that is what he feels when low. My daughter always says "her legs are tired" and sure enough she is low.

    You can always talk to your doctor if you are concerned with it.
     
  11. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,384
    I obtained my M.D. from The Medical College of Wisconsin (formerly known as Marquette University) in May, 1992. (Not kidding. However, I take no offense to your comment above.)


    You make a good point about not knowing exactly what is going on with the OP's son. My original post was made with the assumption that the OP's 8-year-old son had more than likely not suffered from prolonged and severe high BGs from untreated T1D for a protracted period of time because, had this been the case, he would likely not still be alive. As I'm sure you're aware, PWDs (specifically those with T1D) experience DKA after their BGs are significantly elevated for several days to weeks (rarely months.). I'm reasonably certain that the OP brought her son to his pediatrician or the ER once (if) he became ketoacidotic.


    I agree wholeheartedly with your statement above.
     
  12. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030
    I know an adult that was just DX'd last year with Type 1, he was also DX'd with neuropathy shortly afterwards.Unlikely yes, but not "no way".
     
  13. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    I think it's typical for T1s diagnosed as adults to have a much longer, slower onset. It's part of the reason they're often misdiagnosed as T2. So they could have high BG for a while without ever reaching DKA. With kids, once BGs start hitting numbers likely to cause damage, onset is almost always fast and furious. It really would be stunningly unlikely for an 8 year old to already have nerve damage. And if they did, I wouldn't expect the symptoms to only occur when the child was low.
     
  14. Mish

    Mish Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,393
    that's what I was thinking, too.

    If someone said that their child's legs tingled when low, or their stomach got butterfly feelings, or they got lightheaded, would we be suggesting that they go off to the doctors to check it out because (in addition to being low) they might also have a brain tumor, or gastroparesis, or MS? No, we wouldn't. So why would anyone think that tingling feet, which is a very normal low symptom, warrants any further investigation? Further, maybe someone can search, but has anyone here on this board ever once posted about neuropathy in an 8 year old newly dx child?

    Sadly, to the OP, I'm sure it's because "I" said it that it got jumped on. ;) Sorry that your thread was hijacked and that you're now probably needlessly worrying.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2014
  15. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,384
    To mmgirls, I must echo hawkeyegirl's reply. Children often have vastly different T1D presentations than adults. The onset in children is indeed fast and furious; children simply do not continue to function with BGs high enough and of adequate duration to cause peripheral neuropathy (as is sometimes the case with adults.). So I stand by my "no way."
     
  16. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,384
    I'm going to add my own two cents to what Mish just wrote. As the parent of a child newly diagnosed with T1D, I haven't been a member of this Forum long enough to know any specifics about the personal politics going on here. But I've read enough posts to notice that the comments/advice/information posted by some members, regardless of their accuracy, seem to be accepted graciously as what I believe the writers intended them to be: heartfelt attempts to give helpful advice to other parents struggling with this serious disease and its immense challenges. Posts made by other members, once again regardless of the accuracy or reliability of the information contained within, seem to be quickly shot down or met with undeniable hostility. I'm not saying that misinformation should be ignored or accepted, and I value the fact that every post that I've come across on this Forum containing clearly erroneous information has been promptly called out and corrected. But I can't help but notice that some of the most benign, nonjudgmental, non-commanding and well-intentioned advice is summarily dismissed with the justification that the author shouldn't be offering medical advice that is potentially harmful. If this were truly the case, I don't believe that this Forum or others like it would exist.
     
  17. susanlindstrom16

    susanlindstrom16 Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    371
    My daughter recently told me that she knows she is low because her knees start feeling weird and hurting.
     
  18. Jordansmom

    Jordansmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,172
    rgcainmd I like you already. :smile: Welcome.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice