- advertisement -

My daughter wants to go back on MDI

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, Aug 31, 2013.

  1. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    My 4 year old is telling me she doesn't want to be on the pump anymore. In a way, I want it to be up to her of course but at 4, I'm worried she's just saying it because she knows how frustrated I get with the pump and I personally want to go back to shots. I am just not having that much luck with the pump after 5 months using it. We were talking about it at the doctor and she suggested at least being on the pump in the beginning of school so they can train the nurse to use it, and my daughter started crying because she said she didn't want to be on it anymore. That just made me pretty upset. Of course we all told her that she could go back to shots eventually if that's what she really wants. I want to do what's best for her and at this point, I just don't know if pumping is what's best for her. I also don't know if she was just so used to needles after using them for 3 years, she was just more comfortable using them.

    What would you do in this situation?

    I would love for her to be able to use a pen but because she's on small doses of insulin, that little amount that comes out of the pen, really makes a difference. So I know we''ll have to wait to use the pens until she's older.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    How does she know what you want? How does she know you're frustrated with the pump?
     
  3. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    I talk to my husband about it to make him understand. He doesn't really do much with the diabetes stuff because he works a lot. He wants her to stay on the pump because he thinks its easier so I tell him about my frustrations with certain aspects of the pumps so he can understand why I'm actually frustrated.

    I know I probably shouldn't talk about this stuff in front of her but she is literally always.right.there. We don't have anyone babysit her or anything so there's never time to ourselves without the kids.
     
  4. StacyMM

    StacyMM Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,039
    We first tried a pump at 4. DD freaked out and never even wore a site home from training. At 6, we pushed it and she wore it. Never really liked it, however, and when she became vocal, we told her she could change her mind but she had to stick it out until she was 8 (she was 7 at the time). She turned 8 and said, "No pump" so we went back to MDI. Honestly, I think the only reason she is pumping now is because her brother is and she didn't want him to have anything 'cooler' than she did. She is perfectly happy on MDI, and her a1c numbers are always better on MDI. I'd have no problem if she decided to switch....but I would dread that 4:00 or 5:00 am Levemir dose :eek:

    All that to say...I have no issue letting four year olds make calls on their care, if they have strong feelings. Besides, knowing how easy it is to make the switch back, a switch to MDI could be nothing more than a pump break. It could be very short term...or you could find out that it works really well for you.

    Whatever you decide, good luck :)
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    It's just that for young kids, all kids really, it's very hard for them to tease out when a parent is frustrated by type 1, and when they are frustrated with the child.

    It is my personal opinion that pumping is a preferable was of managing Type 1. That's my bias. I think it's easier in the school setting, easier with social interaction, just easier. That said, not everyone feels that way. However, I do not imagine that your child is basing her desire on any of that - she's basing it, I suspect on how she can make mommy happy. Imho, that's not a valid reason to switch back to MDI.

    Can you elaborate on just what it is that is frustrating your efforts? Maybe we can help?
     
  6. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    What you say makes sense. She probably thinks im frustrated with her. Our reasons for choosing to go on the pump were: to make things easier for school since she's starting on the 9th, lantus peaking in the middle of the night, and we thought she would have better postprandial numbers ( but that happened because of diet change, not the pump)

    The problems I have are ones that I've already asked for help about :cwds: -Air bubbles in tubing- tried using room temp insulin, did nothing. I caught one late last night thankfully & I primed it out in the morning. I just happened to look at that time though..
    -Kinked cannulas- tried different sets- this actually got alot better when we switched to regular insets for over a month then we had 2 kinked cannulas in a row and that was enough to really annoy the hell out of me. However, after those 2, we've been fine for a couple weeks.
    -We've already had to get the pump replaced for no delivery issues.
    -Everytime I change her site, the first night she stays low all night no matter what I do. I shouldn't have to do a temp basal everytime I change a site IMO. I hate the red marks that the sites leave on her.
    - shes had much more lows but if i adjust basal in the slighest, she'll be high.

    I like that there are less variables to consider when something goes wrong on MDI- for us most of the time we had issues on MDI it was that the insulin had gone bad.

    I feel like I shouldn't still be having these issues
     
  7. quiltinmom

    quiltinmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,189
    A few thoughts. You might be too stressed in general, making pump problems seem more awful to you. Also I don't think a four year old knows the difference between frustration with pump or with her (meaning she likely knows you hav e been more angry since pump start and wants to go back to happy mom). Maybe there are a few more bugs you can work out to make things work better.


    That said, it sounds like everyone will be happier going back. Pumping isn't wonderful for everyone. Shots can be handled at school. If that is one way to eliminate some stress from your life, I would do it. She'll most likely want to go back to pumping at some point but for now you have to do what works for today.

    Good luck! Let us know how it goes.

    Oh, and there's no point in training the school people on the pump if you plan to go back to shots. I wouldn't even worry about that. If shots is what you plan to do I'd do that at school from the start. That's JMO.
     
  8. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030
    Have you thought about trying untethered?

    We did untethered for over a year and now still sort of do it, can not really cal it untethered while on the Omnipod.

    We give a shot of Lantus at night and run minimal basal during the night. With a pod on I can bolus a hcorrection or do an increased basal.
     
  9. danismom79

    danismom79 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2008
    Messages:
    5,300
    It does sound like pumping just isn't for you. Those all sound like pretty typical problems we all have to work through at some point or another, even after years of pumping. Even on the pod, we get some variation of what you listed. If you're this frustrated after a few months, I imagine it will just get worse for you over the years. Or you could end up taking a break and put things in perspective and realize it wasn't all that bad.

    A suggestion if you go back to MDI: what about giving Lantus in the morning so you don't get the overnight peak?
     
  10. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    Update

    I wanted to give you all an update on how things are going. We went on vacation last week and after having issues (some old issues) I thought it wouldn't hurt to try MDI at that point, esp since we were at the beach anyway. My first issue with the pump on vacation was that the first day she went swimming with the pump, even with IV prep and opsite over the site, it still came off. I had put it on the day before. Then she was running high and at first I thought that that would happen on vacation however, I was cooking so we weren't eating crap, we were eating stuff she normally eats. So after seeing high numbers, that's when I put her on lantus and humalog ( I always bring lantus as a back up anyway) When I took out the site she had a kinked cannula yet again...I was leary about the lantus since some people on here said it takes a few days to kick in but that wasn't the case. It worked right away. Unfortunately, we are going to go back to pumping tomorrow to get ready for school starting on monday and then we will give it another month. If things are still frustrating for us, we will go back to MDI.

    Every night when we went to bed, my daughter would say, "I hope I can be on shots tomorrow" lol

    On mdi, we are still battling some lows but I think that's because I'm not used to giving her her complete carb factors, like she needs one unit for 21g of carbs. I've been so used to giving her different amounts that I forget that I have to add in some carbs here and there to account for the .5 u nits on the shots. also, because like before, the lantus peaks in the middle of the night so I will take the advice and if we do wind up back on mdi for a longer period of time, I will give it to her in the morning.

    The good thing is that with the nurses at the school districts, they are much more used to shots. They had to do the pump training in preparation for my daughter to come so I feel comfortable if we do decide to go back to mdi. We also found out just now that she will have an actual RN as her 1:1, not just an aide. They also hired a substitute RN for when her main nurse is not there.
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Wow. Your public school is willing to spend $50K on a 1:1 RN for your daughter, alone? Did you have to bring in a lawyer?
     
  12. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    Noooo, my daughters endo only requested a trained aide BUT one of the nurses in the district pushed for an RN because she thought someone who couldnt legally administer insulin was pointless. There's also a sub RN that they hired. The school district is really good with that kind of stuff and they also get a lot of funding because it's a low income area. Maybe that has something to do with it. It's one of those districts that never had to cut anything because of funding. A lot of other districts around here had to cut out extras like music, etc..
     
  13. Abbysmom

    Abbysmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2010
    Messages:
    168
    have you tried Contact Detach sets

    I am huge advocate of pumping. I would literally give up absolutely anything before going to back to MDI. I understand pumping is not for everyone but your experience sounds exactly like my first months until we switched to more reliable steal sets. A steel set cannot kink and delivers consistent insulin.
     
  14. shannong

    shannong Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    Messages:
    568
    When I read your post, I realize that I have had many of the same issues, but I guess because the pump seems worth it to me for so many other reasons, I kind of just roll with it. I'm wondering if after 3 years of MDI, you got really good at it, and now the pump is another learning curve. We only did MDI for 9 months and even then I was really worried about the learning curve because I felt that I was just getting the hang of MDI. As someone said in another post, if stress is playing a factor, than every snag you come across with the pump will just not seem worth it.

    This is only my opinion and I realize many others don't feel this way, but I think in the long term you will work through the problems with the pump and find it a better way of insulin delivery. Also, I think your daughter is probably responding to your frustration and just wants to see you happy again and thus says she wants to go on shots again. I know it is hard to not show that frustration, but I think it is really, really, important to not let our children see us getting down about D.
     
  15. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    We had issues with those too. They absolutely suck at sticking. I was soo surprised. But we are going back to pumping for school's sake for the time being. We're going to give it another month. In that time, I'll probably switch between sets since I still have the contact detach, Ill just use the opsite tape I have this time...I'm sure a lot of people can't wait to put their kids on pumps for a bunch of reasons but I only had like 2 reasons. I really didn't mind shots so much because my daughter doesn't mind them. I didn't ever really want her on the pump and it was a really hard decision to make (her endo brought it up during every appt lol) but I was trying to do what I thought was best for her.
     
  16. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    Yes, I do think we got pretty good at it and we were so used to it, as was my daughter. My endo was very happy with her A1Cs and I think a little suprised too. Now, we've dealt with diabetes for a good amount of time so I of course am over the shock of it all and don't consider myself a downer at all when it comes to it but I feel like the pump is a constant reminder of it and it's alwaysss there. I usually see the big picture like at least it's not worse like cancer or so many other things out there, and that its manageable. I don't know if others feel this way but its like.. seeing the pump all the time makes me kind of sad.
     
  17. TheLegoRef

    TheLegoRef Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2011
    Messages:
    328
    Slightly the same here. I also agree that pumping is not for everyone, but I cannot imagine not having temp basals or square/dual boluses. We had several months where it seemed like no site worked (about a year ago, well into pumping). We played with taping it down, inserting it, emla cream, etc, etc, and pushed through our issues. We haven't had a site issue in a while, other than a ripped out site due to itching in the middle of the night (rolls eyes). Also I love having the back up data so I can see what insulin was given while he was at school or not at home.
     
  18. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Messages:
    888
    I do understand, and I think many of us know what you mean. K has been pumping for 2 years, and I still have moments every once in a while. Most of the time, though, I know it is there like I know that his underwear is there (or, at least, I hope it is, but as he is 5, that's not a given :rolleyes:), beneath his clothes doing what it is meant to do. I guess I think of the pump the same way I would think about a watch--it is a functional item that attaches to his body.

    Honestly, his medicalert bracelet gives me little pangs more often than his pump--and even that happens only rarely.
     
  19. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Well, I can envision my kid wearing a pump or I can envision her shlepping around syringes and vials of insulin and a cooler in summer and stopping to excuse herself from the pizza party to go draw up a syringe and inject herself and it's no contest, hands down the pump makes her life more normal for HER. Other people may look at her and see a device, I look at her and I see freedom.
     
  20. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    846
    I guess I might feel different if she were the one having to carry around all supplies. Since shes 4, I carry everything of course. I was hoping when she got older, she'd go on the pen so she wouldnt need to carry separate syringes and insulin. With the way things have been though, ive had to give her a few injection corrections on the pump in one wk. its a good thing we were home when it happened. i carry a pen vial of insulin now just in case but its probably bad by now, i only had one left
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice