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my cure hope

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Barry, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. Barry

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    I'm not sure I care about a cure for my son's D anymore.

    (dont get me wrong, I'd jump at the chance)....but I'm not preoccupied like I once was. My son's D doesn't effect him to the extent he doesnt live and do the things that non-Ds do. So many examples of life long D's with good health and old age has made living with D not too damn bad. If there's no cure for him, I dont believe either of us are going to sweat it.

    What I pray for now is there IS a cure, vaccination, genetic test, etc. My biggest D wish is that my son not be forced to go through what each of us have been through with a D child of his on.

    As only a young adult, he can't yet understand a parent's anguish regarding a child's disability and I pray he forever lacks that understanding. I wish for all our children that they never can truly empathize with us and they continue to believe we're just crazy, overprotective, complusive, idiot parents with nothing better to do than ask "how's your blood?"
     
  2. sam1nat2

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    My thoughts too Barry;)
    Sam does just as much, if not more, than a child without D.

    A cure would be wonderful, but if it doesn't happen, he sure has a pretty awesome life as it is:D
     
  3. kiwimum

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    Here here Barry!

    We never took the path of anguishing about a cure for D for our son. We deliberately made the decision at diagnosis to leave the search for a cure to those that do it best and support them in their cause when and if we are able. I didn't want to spend so much of my precious time searching for something that I honestly don't think is going to happen for my son. I didn't and don't want to spend my life being disappointed that it never happened. I would much rather spend my time enjoying my family and all that life has to offer us.

    But like every parent on here, I would be thrilled at a cure and would move heaven and earth to get it for my son. And I too wish that one day, maybe our children won't have to go through what we go through to keep them healthy and feeling the anguish of watching their children deal with D.
     
  4. Seans Mom

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    While I understand and agree, I also have the wish that my son would not have to take this all on himself one day.
    I would like for him to go to sleep at night and not worry about if his bg goes too low while he's asleep, or waking up with an EMT standing over him. I'd like for him to not feel bad or guilty that he forgot to bolus for that extra eggnog at the office Christmas party because he was having so much fun. Or worry about getting complications even if he's been vigilant with his care.
    These are some of the things we as parents worry about true, but it's things I've read adults with D worry about also. I don't want that for him or them. ;)
    So while I don't dwell on the cure, I still hope and send my prayers up for it. :D
     
  5. Thoover

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    Very well said Barry.

    I think as the years pass by we are more relaxed and yet still have that hope for the cure but not like it was when the first initial diagnosis came (I think I was a rampage of a mother)..

    I don't want what happened to my daughter happen to her children or anyone elses. I just want her to be HAPPY!!

    I do often wonder when she is all grown up and moves out will I constantly call her every morning to make sure she is up and asking her numbers? :rolleyes:
     
  6. StillMamamia

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    This is where I am too, so I get what you're saying.
    I do have a space reserved for hoping for a cure, but, in all honesty, mostly for the newly dx or just as prevention of T1 D. Our "new normal" or whatever you want to call it, is just part of our lives.

    I still hate it though and have my sad moments, but purely for selfish reasons - it is exhausting and sometimes I really want a break from it all, for my son to have a break too would be awesome, but I know the reality and know the answer to my wish.
     
  7. MelStan

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    Well I'll be the different one here, and say I do want a cure for my daughter. (I know nobody here said they didn't want it) And I'll be very disappointed if prevention for T1 is all that comes of the research that's being done.

    I'm TERRIFIED of the thought of her living on her own with this.

    I'm not preoccupied or obsessive about the cure..I think I'm pretty realistic about the chances. But yeah, I very much want it for her..not just for the kids she may end up having.
    I want her to know life without this foul disease.
     
  8. Barry

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    Ironically, if Eilish, Brittney, Sean, Tyler, Alex and Sam turn have inherited their parent's compassion, they too will care little about their own cure and comfort and spend their entire "wish bank" on their own D child.
     
  9. kiwimum

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    Thank you Barry for such kind words. It actually bought a small tear to my eye to be described as compassionate! :)
    Funnily enough, Tyler himself has only asked once about a cure. He asked us if one was found, would we get it for him even if it was really really really expensive.
    We were honest and told him that we would try our darndest, even if it meant selling a kidney each, but the reality is that we probably wouldn't be able to fund it.
    And his reply was "Fair enough!"
    Seems only his parents have a problem accepting bloody D!:(
     
  10. StillMamamia

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    Uh oh...guess Ian's out of the question then.:eek:
     
  11. kiwimum

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    I'm sure Barry was just having a 'man moment'! :D
     
  12. StillMamamia

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    :D;)

    oh geez! message too short:rolleyes:
     
  13. MelStan

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    Thanks Barry. That was very kind of you :) And you're probably right too..
     
  14. Barry

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    trust me.....no one is going to develop a cure you cant afford...its not a money maker for the drug companies if it is unaffordable. I'd bet a beta cell insertion into the pancreas or liver along with a vax to keep it from being destroyed will be less than 500 bucks in 5 yrs....what a cash paying pumper spends in 2 weeks
     
  15. Barry

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    Assuming when your D's name isnt in your signature, its an internet privacy thing.






    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2010
  16. quiltinmom

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    I agree--nicely put.

    Soon after DS was dx'd, it got me thinking...of all the lifelong diseases he could've gotten, I'd say D is one of the less bad ones. He can still live a normal life, do anything he would've done anyway. He's not stuck in a hospital bed for months on end. When you look at it that way, it's a lot easier to count your blessings.

    I sometimes tell people, "he can do anything he wants, except be a pilot." (DH says you can't be a pilot if you have D...I haven't fact-checked, but I assume that's true.) So far I haven't found anything else he can't do.

    So I guess I'm in the same boat as Barry. I'm grateful he has been able to easily accept his disease (so far). We've tried to have a positive attitude about it, which has made a huge difference for us.
     

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