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Motivational Interviewing in Health Care

Discussion in 'Diabetes Book Club' started by Ellen, Sep 2, 2008.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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  2. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

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    That really does look interesting to me, Ellen. Not sure I want to swing for the cost at this time, but I'll check the local library.

    P.S. Library isn't carrying it - probably not the type of book for the general public. Looks like it's more for therapists, but I think it does look interesting. Let us know what you think about it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2008
  3. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    I hope more practitioners will embrace motivational interviewing when working with patients with diabetes. Although I'm only on the first chapter, I'll provide you with a few quotes.

    "When a patient seems unmotivated to change or to take the sound advice of practitioners, it is often assumed that there is something the matter with the patient and that there is not much one can do about it. These assumptions are usually false. No person is completely unmotivated."

    "Part of MI [motivational interviewing] is connecting health behavior change with what your patients care about, with their own values and concerns. This can be done only by understanding patients' own perspectives by evoking their own good reasons and arguments for change."

    "Ironically, it is acknowledging the other's right and freedom not to change that sometimes makes change possible."

    "It is a natural human tendency to resist persuasion. This is particularly true when one is ambivalent about something."

    "It is the patients' own reasons for change, and not yours, that are most likely to trigger behavior change."

    "..you are better off asking patients why they would want to make a change and how they might do it rather than telling them that they should. It is the patient, rather than you, who should be voicing the arguments for behavior change."
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2008
  4. OSUMom

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    Others love math. This is the kind of reading that is interesting to me. Thanks for sharing. Feel free to share more as you continue to read. :D
     

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