- advertisement -

More Independent but Worse Control

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by earruda, Dec 12, 2006.

  1. earruda

    earruda Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Messages:
    25
    I am writing because we are having increased difficulty getting my daughter's blood sugar in control. She is 12 and on the pump now for about 1.5 years (diabetes for 2.5). I am a nurse and when I was managing her diabetes we had her A1C around 7. Now she is more independent (changing her sites, making lunch ect) but her 3 month blood sugar average is..... 208!! I am afraid to go to the diabetes center for her apt!! I feel like such a failure that I am not able to stay on top of this. I work 50+ hours a week and with the pump it is very easy to lose track of things. I couldn't even say the word diabetes yesterday without crying. I got her hooked up with Medtronic's on-line diabetes mgt system so hopefully we can download her data weekly and get back on track. I hope 3 months of a 208 blood sugar hasn't done damage to her kidneys..... How do you stay on top of things with the daily diabetes grind and what on earth do you as the teenage years approach????
     
  2. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    My son is 12 and recently started using the pump. It seems to me that one of the hardest things to do is transfer control of the diabetes to the teenager and have them be as successful as you were. I say "seems to me" because my son has not picked up on all of what to do quite yet. He is responsible for testing and doing boluses at school and treating lows and highs. He has gone from testing 3 times at school to testing once. He does bolus for all his food, which is helpful. He may look like a young adult, but I have to double-check almost everything he does. He makes giagantic mistakes (like bolusing 19 units when it should have been 4. Thank goodness for eggnog.)

    I review his meter and pump every day and we talk for a minute or two about the bolus he gave or when he ate the glucose tabs for a low. I write down everything on a chart to look for patterns. If I don't do this, his A1c goes up. He is already on an ace inhibitor for the loss of kidney function. His control has never been bad. All his A1cs have been under 8 since he was 7, but the kidneys were affected anyway.

    It sounds like you want you daughter to take on more than she can do successfully. She may need you to look over her shoulder -- to hold her accountable, daily.
     
  3. munchkingirl

    munchkingirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    213
    One of the best things you can do is, while allowing your youngsters to have more control - don't give it completely to them too young! My parents (and several of my friends as well) gave us almost complete control at 12-14 years old and "diabetes burnout" happens a whole lot quicker an easier for kids - because they have friends that don't have to deal with all the troubles of diabetes. So, kids really get burned out soooo bad trying to take care of themselves all the time, all by their selves.

    But that said, another good thing is to not be too controling. Allow them to make mistakes and figure stuff out without freaking out. It's part of that "preparing" that parents do to get their kids ready for going out on their own. :D
     
  4. kiwikid

    kiwikid Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    Have you bolus limits set into the pump to prevent this kind of mistake? Rachels teacher aide made a "big mistake" once and I'm so glad the pump declined her bolus :eek:
     
  5. kittycatgirl

    kittycatgirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Maybe her ratio's need adjustment?

    Okay, I am not a nurse and I am still pretty new to this as my 12 year old girl isn't at the one year mark but hopefully this might help. At 12 my endo. tells me their numbers are going to be up and down because of hormones. They just made two adjustments in the last 2 months to her carb ratio's and her correction factor. My daughter isn't on the pump but I am told Lantus works just like the pump. Maybe it isn't something you two are doing, maybe it is just her body growing so fast that you two can't keep up with it. My endo tells me that she is probably going to have more insulin over the next two years then she will have as an adult because of her rapid growth and hormone levels. She also told me to keep in close contact with them so they can keep on top of her numbers. Even though you both are pro's at this, her age might dictate closer contact with the endo for adjustments. I understand how hard it is to start giving the freedom over to them. I struggle with the issue of allowing her to do things her friends are doing and not saying no because of diabetes mng. I think your endo would be proud of you for giving your daughter more control over her diabetes. My endo mostly talks to my daughter at appointments anyway. Good luck with her #'s.
     
  6. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    Quite often he does need 20 or more units for a meal. The kid can eat 250 grams of carbohydrate in a meal without blinking an eye. At 5'11" and 125 lbs, he needs to eat a lot.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice