- advertisement -

Monkey fur???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mmgirls, Apr 6, 2016.

  1. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030
    OK, so I am hispanic with dark almost black hair, hubby is blonde/ light brown.

    My oldest had a fine coat of fuzz "monkey fur" as my mother called it on young kids, she told me I had a "monkey swirl" on my upper back for a long time. My oldest did untill 4 or 5 years.

    But my youngest DX 2 years ago is almost 8 years old and still has a fine coat "everywhere". A prominent back swirl and a mustache.

    She is very thin and I remember in school reading about how malnutrition can cause a fine hair growth, I can't remember the term that was used for kids not babies.

    While we do not eat the best, she is fed and enjoys a great variety of foods. But I wonder if there could be something else going on in the background?

    Any ideas on what I should look into? Yearly labs are coming up so want to be able to include anytjing that could be insightful.
     
  2. Lakeman

    Lakeman Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    956
    It is probably nothing to worry about. There are a lot of causes of excess hair and most of them are harmless and often it just happens with no particular cause.

    So that you can do more research know that one type of excess hair is called hirsutism, this is excess hair on the parts of the body that respond to hormones; underarms, face (beard), pubic regions. Another type of excess hair is called hypertrichosis, this is excess hair on the limbs or torso, but is in contrast to androgen sensitive body parts.

    Yes hypertrichosis could be caused by malnutrition, generally in persons with anorexia or belemia or persons who do not get enough carbs to provide basic energy. Since your child is a type 1 diabetic your doctor might consider celiac disease as a cause of malnutrion. Increasing carbs should not be neccessary since very few are actually needed to provide basic nutrition especially if there are other sources of energy (like fat).
     
  3. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030

    Thank you for your response to my "off color title"!

    I have often wondered about Celiac, but Madison absorbs carbs so qiuckly ( much faster than her sister) that I really do not thing it is that. she gets plenty of carbs thru the day 125-150 for a 8 year old. While I consider her active, she is just so thin. I can count bones. She is much harder to figure out insulin, she needs so much more than her ssister needed at the same age and is thinner.

    But they are so different on many levels! My oldest has been hypo aware from the get go at 13 months, et my Madison can be in the 40/50's and not know.
     
  4. Mimikins

    Mimikins Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Messages:
    203
    It might be completely normal -aren't our palms and soles the only places on the body that aren't covered in some sort of hair?

    I'm also really hairy (arms, unibrow, girlstache, stomach hair that needs to be shaved/waxed during the summer, etc.) and have been my entire life. My younger sister is also hairy (her knuckles are super hairy), so it might simply be that we both lost the genetic lottery and have darker vellus hair.
     
  5. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030
    You are right. I am fairly hairy, but it is not "all" over.

    I think I might increase her fat and protein, I want to for my oldest for another reason anyways.
     
  6. kiwikid

    kiwikid Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    Rachel is excessively hairy and was recently diagnosed with PCOS.. LH dominant .. She started on Ginet 84 which contains cyproterone
    acetate which has really helped to prevent unwanted hair.
     
  7. Lakeman

    Lakeman Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    956
    Fat, protein, and carbs are the three major macro ingredients. Unless she has been restricting any of them it is unlikely that anyone in the United States does not get enough (though quality is a completely different story). On the other hand there a ton of micro nutrients like vitamins, minerals, amino acids, a long list of phytonutrients, and an even longer list of "other stuff." I enjoy solving my health problems (though I do normally see my doctor first) through diet with changes in diet or the addition of supplements, herbs, etc. Over the years I have had many successes with things but also some failures that I would not want to see anyone repeat. Foods can be as effective as drugs and they can have side effects too.

    Wildly playing around with no guidance or plan is asking for trouble. There are doctors called naturopaths who tend to know about this kind of stuff and if your endo or regular doctor can't help then maybe naturopath can. You can also do your own research. Rather than blindly changing her diet look for specific deficiencies and correct them. Most Americans are deficient in something.

    Some thoughts on places to start:

    Has your doctor tested her to see if she has an excess of adrenal hormones? (though I would first suspect everyday genetics)

    Has your doctor ruled out PCOS? Have you looked into Metformin or turmeric to see if either would help?

    There are products in the store, lotions, that contain papaine and are supposed to inhibit hair growth by weakening the structure of hairs so that eventually they thin out and fall out. Unfortunately they enzymes degrade while the bottle is on the shelf and there is little or no evidence that they actually work. One could try rubbing fresh squeezed pineapple juice on the hairy areas. It sounds like a lot of bother and what kind of message does that send to a young woman. If she is not bothered now perhaps wait until she is a teen and then if it has not resolved on its own due to puberty (as the female hormones estrogen and progesterone increase) she might make her own decision to wax. Would she want to wax now?? My own daughter has fairly thick vellus on her back with swirls but she is blonde and it is not that noticeable. I just ignore it. (there are also bleaches that will lighten the color of body hair).

    Electrolysis is painful and expensive.

    The liver is responsible for removing excess hormones and binding them to fiber in the colon where they can be excreted. Excess sugar consumption breaks the bond between the excess hormones and the fiber so that the hormone is then recirculated back into the bloodstream resulting in even more excess. Apples contain a product which stops the hormone from being broken away from the fiber. Conclusion: eat less sugar and more apples. The apples also provide the fiber.

    Could xenoestrogens be a cause? The solution could be to reduce plastic exposure and exposure to cosmetics which contain them. What about the hormones that were fed to the animal products she eats?

    best wishes
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice