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Middle school girl-she went low but didn't want to bother her teacher.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kittycatgirl, Aug 31, 2006.

  1. kittycatgirl

    kittycatgirl Approved members

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    My daughter was going low in class today. It is the first week of school....many new teachers (8/day)....many new students in her class. She started feeling low, tested under her desk and had some glucose tabs all while the teacher continued to teach. I asked her if they called the nurse to tell her about the documented low (part of 504)... she said no, the teacher didn't even now. Which means the nurse didn't know either.

    My question is.... How do I solve this issue? How do I get her comfortable with telling the teacher when she is low when she isn't even thinking clearly because her BS is off and this will make her "different"? I can't even be upset with anyone because they didn't know and she basically did what she was suppose to do. Test and Treat.

    Any great ideas?
    Thanks, Diana
     
  2. pookas

    pookas Approved members

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    I saw somewhere that a younger child would hold up a card w/ a color red on it so the teacher would become aware w/out really disrupting and the teacher should go straight to her desk when she sees it. My son is only 6 and today he told the teacher he had to go to the nurse and didn't specify he was low and ended up going alone. I hope he doesn't feel embarrassed or anything. I'm trying to stress the importance of telling the teacher. Even if he has to go up to the teacher and pull on her shirt.
     
  3. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    First I'd praise your daughter for checking her blood sugar and taking action. That's a HUGE step for a middle school child - especially surrounded by friends. It was a great survival skill too.

    When her bg is in target, ask her how she would like to handle letting teachers know. Get her input. Empower her in the process and let her know you're there to support her suggestions....brainstorm.
     
  4. Ivan's Mum

    Ivan's Mum Approved members

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    my son

    my son is pretty good at knowing when he's going low. He's only just turned 5 and I have a line that he uses ' Hi my name is Ivan, I'm a diabetic and I feel shakey' he says to to one of the teachers in the playground and all the teachers know if he approaches them, they take him to the sick bay immediatley. I also have a photo sheet in the class room and staff room explaining what is to happen with him (briefly) and what the signs to look for are (tired, shakey, etc) The photo and 1 page of informaation has been great for when his teacher is away and reliever comes in.

    At 5 he's not too worried about being up on the wall by the teachers desk, when he get's a problem with everyone knowing, I guess he'll be older.

    He does no finger pricking in class, always in the sick bay where someone is there to make sure he washes his hands, you know what boys are like! I don't know what the forms are that you're talking about as I'm in New Zealand but if you've not got the information up on the wall for all teachers to read, I'd recommend it. The class room one has prooved esential for me.

    Cheers,
    Francesca
     
  5. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    My son tests and eats glucose tabs when low in class, but I don't have him do anything extra. His meter keeps track of the readings, so I know when he gets home that he was low, plus he is missing some tabs.

    It is hard for a middle school student to do anything that shows she is different than the other students. Having some sort of quiet way to inform the adults that need to know.

    I am wondering why you have the statement in the 504 that lows be documented...
     
  6. KarenB

    KarenB Approved members

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    I don't have to worry about this anymore but something that Pookas said kind of worried me. "My son is only 6 and today he told the teacher he had to go to the nurse and didn't specify he was low and ended up going alone. " When Lauren was in elementary school she would have to go to the nurse's office before lunch, she always got to leave the class a little bit early so she wouldn't be late. It was the schools rule that she didn't go alone to the nurse...EVER. There was always another student with her. They felt (and I agreed) that it was safer that way, in case she was low the "buddy" could run along and let someone know to come and help Lauren. I am wondering if anyone's school does this or are they letting the kids go to the nurse to test alone?
     
  7. pookas

    pookas Approved members

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    KarenB, Hunter was not supposed to be alone. He has an aide, but they have her working in 3 different classes. That WILL change today one way or another. I've been fuming since I found out.
     
  8. nantomsuethom

    nantomsuethom Approved members

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    Thomas always tests and treats in the classroom. He tests a lot, so if he were to leave the classroom everytime he tested he would miss too much class time. He knows when he is going low and catches it before it goes too low.
     
  9. Pammers

    Pammers Approved members

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    What remarkable preteens you all have!!! Taking charge of their diabetes. I am curious, do they retest to make sure they're back up? That's probably the one reason I would want an adult involved: to follow up and make sure the BG returns to a good range.
     
  10. nantomsuethom

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    Thomas rechecks after he corrects for a low. He also rechecks when he boluses for a high bg, to make sure it is coming down.
     
  11. monkey97

    monkey97 Approved members

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    Phillip always has someone got with him to the sick bay, even if it's not diabetes related. The nurse at diagnosis warned us that things can change very quickly if he's ill or hurt. He always retests after a low. We had a scary low last year. We had gone up the mountain near my parents. At least 1/2 hour walk from the car. His bsl wouldn't come up. We tested and treated four times before it did. It didn't go below 2.5 (50), but it was scary thinking it wasn't going to come up and we were running out of glucose. I think it was the excitement as it was the first time he'd been in the snow.
     
  12. jvoyles

    jvoyles Guest

    Why does she need to tell the teacher?

    My daughter is in middle school too (8th grade). Starting in 6th grade, she has carried her testing and glucose in her purse and does exactly what your daughter did...tests, treats, goes on. I always know that she had a low because I review her meter at the end of each day and we can discuss it and I can make insulin adjustments for that. The teachers are only instructed to help her in the case of an extreme low where she can't help herself. They are to watch for her putting her head down on her desk, getting her testing supplies out but not following through with testing or treating, looking dazed or confused, or not responding to questions properly. If any of that occurs, they are to put a straw in a juicebox that I provided, put it into her mouth and tell her to "drink". Should this not work, they are to call the clinic and someone will come to give glucagon or the teacher can get her glucagon out of her purse and give it themselves.

    She does not go to the clinic unless she has a pump problem or feels sick or following a situation like the one above where she needed assistance (which has never happened)

    What do you want to happen next if your daughter raises her hand and the teacher calls on her and she says "I was just low?"
     

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