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Middle of the Night BG Testing?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Ellen, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    How many of you get up in the middle of the night to test your child's blood sugar? If so, how often and at what times do you check? Does your child generally wake on his/her own with a low?
     
  2. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    We get up at 3am every night to check. After having diabetes for over 4 years, my son (who's 5) still does not have consistent enough blood sugars at night where I can feel comfortable not checking him. We check him at his bedtime (8pm), when we go to bed (around 11pm), then again at 3am. My son doesn't usually wake up on his own when he's low (which is why I have to check him at night) . If he's low, we give him those snack pack puddings at night. And we give him a bolus if he's high. Everything from what he ate for dinner, to the weather, to his activity level after dinner affects his nighttime levels. Good luck!
     
  3. Red (aus)

    Red (aus) Approved members

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    I tested at 2 or 3 am for the best part of the first year. Since then I only test at night if Taylor is ill, has been low for most of the day or has had an extremely active day. So not often at all, maybe four or five times a year now.
    Taylor has woken for lows, and other times I wake up. I guess she must be quite restless or something as she's getting low, making enough noise for it to wake me up. This year I think I've treated 2 lows during the night.
    When Taylors night numbers were unpredictable, I used cornflour in milk as part of her bedtime snack and that was enough to keep her up throughout the night.
     
  4. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    My 11-year old son is tested at least once every night. If his bedtime sugar was a little low, he is tested around midnight to be sure it came up. Otherwise, he is tested between 2 and 3 am. My husband is usually up that that hour. Otherwise, I set my alarm and test.

    My son has never woken with a low blood sugar or when he was tested. The overhead light is turned on and he usually doesn't even move through the whole process. He is on injections, and barely reacts to a shot when he is high. He might wake up when he is high to go to the bathroom.
     
  5. Mojo's mommy

    Mojo's mommy Approved members

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    how do you guys do it?

    My daughters sugars are so unpredictable at night. I am reading how some of you do not even need to check, I am so jealous. I must be doing something wrong!!!!! I was told just a few days ago when I was in hospital with my newborn that after her dinner time N peaks that she would not go low after that. Well, I thought I would try it and see. Took her sugar at 2am, it was 16.4, thought she would be okay. By 7am she was in the low 4s. It seems that there is no stability. Does anyone have any suggestions? She has a good bedtime snack...1 starch 1 protein if above 6 if below I give her 2 starches and 1 protein.

    Thanks
    Teri
     
  6. hartpukas

    hartpukas Approved members

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    We test our 14-month occasionally during the night. If she has been running lower than usual then I test her around 11pm and again at about 2 - 3am if she seemed to be low at 11pm. There were a few times that I almost did not test her for fear of being overly paranoid however last time I woke to test her she was in the low 30's and it was only about 2:30am - thankfully instinct kicks in as a parent!

    What is the probability of dropping too low during sleep? I was never told to test her in the middle of the night - I just do it, probably the same reasons we all do, to be on top of where her sugars are at and to determine what she needs.

    A really naive question… if you are on the pump is there an alert that will go off if you are too low? I am not sure if you need to test yourself while on the pump or if it is self-regulated.
     
  7. Amy C.

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    The current pump technology only manages the delivery of insulin and does not include the testing of blood sugar -- so the answer is, No there is not an alarm on the pump that goes off when the person is low. However, there are a couple of continuous glucose monitoring systems that are currently being tested that sound an alarm when the blood sugar is too low. These are called the Navigator and Guardian and have a separate sensor that is placed just under the skin. Even if the two (the CGMS and the meter) were connected, two inserts would need to be done under the skin. I think that sometime next year, these will be on the market. Insurance companies will probably not cover these right away.
     
  8. maverickmom (Kerri)

    maverickmom (Kerri) Approved members

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    I don't routinely check bgs during the night every night. I used to but haven't in a while. I will check if there has been a lot of activity (camp comes to mind, as does sports), or illness, or something significantly different than usual.
    Shannon does tend to wake up when she's low.
     
  9. Melanie

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    We do check our 3 year old daughter in the middle of the night. She will not wake up on her own if her bg is low so it helps us rest more sound if we just take 3 minutes and test her. We test her right before we put her to bed at 8:30 then again at 2:30.
     
  10. mischloss

    mischloss Approved members

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    We don't normally test my son (10 years old and diagnosed in Sept.) but last Friday night I sure needed to. He accidently "double-clicked" on his Lantus pen needle and administered the 6 units twice!!! So we had to check him every 2 hours during the night to make sure his BG wasn't dipped down too quickly. Sent him to bed on a huge glass of O.J. and basically checked frequently throughout the next day and forego-ed the Humalog altogether the next day. Seems the 12 units of Lantus more than took care of any extra carbs that were in his system for meals. But that was scary. He learned a good lesson about consulting parents before he thinks something is malfunctioning. Geeeesh!!! But normally I have been told that the Lantus is great about regulating for extreme lows during the night. Seems to be working so far.
     
  11. Red (aus)

    Red (aus) Approved members

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    Hi Melanie, I definitely understand this. Taylor was 3 at dx and we checked nightly for about the first year but slowly she has become more aware of what is happening with her body and we have been able to drop the extra tests :) It is very hard when they're too young to really understand what is going on and definitely too young to understand changes in their bodies.
     
  12. nantomsuethom

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    I check Thomas in the middle of the night if he has to bolus before he goes to bed.
    I used to check him every night before I went to bed. If he doesn't have a snack after dinner and his bedtime bg is above 100 then I know he will be fine.
    He does wake up at night if he goes low. He used to wake me up but now he corrects and goes back to bed. The only way I know is when I go through his meter to see how he has been running.
     
  13. Mik's Mom

    Mik's Mom Approved members

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    Hi

    I'm new here and not sure if I am doing this right.. my daughter was diagnosed 6 months ago, she is 7 years old. I check her BS eveyr night at 2:30 am..

    She has gone low several nights and I was thankful that I had checked her
     
  14. E~Chic

    E~Chic New Member

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    checking in the middle of the night

    I have always checked my daughter at 3am or 4 am, she has been low a couple of times. I have given her 4 oz of juice, to bring it up. The highs, like last night at 4am she had 209 and I did give her humalog once before when that happened and it went to a low. So I am afraid of the middle of the night humalog ...what should i do?
     
  15. Nana

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    What if you give her less humalog than you would normaly?
     
  16. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    Perhaps you should test a while (every couple of hours) to see if she normally goes down in the early hours. Then decide at what level she would need the insulin. If she is on her way down, there may not be a need for the insulin.

    If she is fine in the morning, I wouldn't give her any insulin.
     
  17. redcurls3

    redcurls3 Approved members

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    I am so glad to find this forum. I have an 8 month old who was dx at 4 months. We have to check his bg at least 8-10 times per day. My husband stays up until 12 to check and I wake up at 3 to check him. Because he is so small, I can't even give him Humalog unless he's over 500. The smallest unit I can give is .5 and even at 490 once he dropped to 80 by 3 am. Hartpukas, I'm glad to find another parent with a small baby. When was your child dx? I can't seem to find any research on small babies with diabetes. He is apparantly a very rare case. Even my doctors don't seem to know what to do. They say just watch the trends and adjust the insulin accordingly. Help please!
     
  18. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    Have you discussed with the pediatric endocrinologist using DILUTED Humalog? That way you can titrate down the dose and give a very tiny amount of it to more safely bring down high blood sugar.

    "Humalog may be diluted with STERILE DILUENT for Humalog[SIZE=-1]®[/SIZE], Humulin[SIZE=-1]®[/SIZE] N, Humulin[SIZE=-1]®[/SIZE] ... to a concentration of 1:10 (equivalent to U-10) or 1:2 (equivalent to U-50). Diluted Humalog may remain in patient use for 28 days when stored at 5°C (41°F) and for 14 days when stored at 30°C (86°F). Do not dilute Humalog when used in an external insulin pump."

    The other way to deliver tiny doses of insulin is with an insulin pump. YOu can find parents of other infants who've used insulin pumps at www.insulin-pumpers.org.

    GOOD LUCK!
     
  19. hartpukas

    hartpukas Approved members

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    Hi Redcurls! It is very tough to find good information on younger patients, isn't it? My daughter was dx'd in Aug. 2005 when she was 11 months. We were giving her 2.5 units of NPH at dinner and then I would test her before her bedtime snack (7 - 7:30ish) and again around 11ish when it (NPH) had pretty much kicked in and again later if she seemed to be dropping. However, since she has been walking and being a bit more active we have cut her back to 2 units at dinner and we are finding that she is not dropping the way she used to - granted this morning she woke up at 50 but she was very active yesterday evening. And since we cut back by .5 a unit we are not having to test her in the night - yet there are those times where I still test her for peace of mind.
    The tough thing about testing her after she has fallen asleep is she then wakes up and wants to be up and about and I really want her to get her sleep so she can continue to grow.
     
  20. redcurls3

    redcurls3 Approved members

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    hartpukas, i'm sorry your daughter wakes up when you check her. I have been blessed that Andy doesn't wake up. He stirs when I check him, but never really wakes up. He has always been able to sleep through anything though. I guess I lucked out.
     

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