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Makaela is started to act out!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Abuchanan, Jan 23, 2007.

  1. Abuchanan

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    I am not sure exactly what is going on with Makaela, but at first she was fine with all this (reminder its only been two weeks now) but all of a sudden she been crying and screaming at everyone for really nothing. Is it possible that she is getting depressed? Did anyone else experience this? I dont know what to do for her. She is normally a very well mannered pleasent child.
    help!!!
     
  2. MrsBadshoe

    MrsBadshoe Super Moderator

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    How high have her BS been running? Usually I associated complete meltdowns with BS highter then 270. I know in the beginning endo's like you to run a little high until you get a grasp of everything being thrown out you. Maybe they are running a little too high and it is effecting her behavior. I know it does for Delaney (9).
     
  3. Abuchanan

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    Her blood sugars are ranging from lowest 95 to the upper 300's. Its up and down all day long.
     
  4. Momof4gr8kids

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    Like Mrs Badshoe said b/g can have a huge effect on behavior. Julia typically acts out when she is low, or if she has been high, and has a sudden drop as well. Or b/g's that are all over the place cause her to be tired and moody.

    It could also be the stress of it all. Maybe she is starting to realize that this isn't going away. About 2, or 3 weeks into diagnosis Julia asked me when her diabetes would be better. That was the hardest conversation I have ever had with any of my kids.

    If it isn't b/g related I would make sure she knows that it is not acceptable to treat others that way, or throw tantrums or whatever other behavior it is at the time, and follow through with a consiquence, or ask if she feels like she needs a personal time out to calm down before talking to you about it.

    Good luck, Jamie
     
  5. MrsBadshoe

    MrsBadshoe Super Moderator

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    Forgot to mention that BS that go up and down constantly really wear my kids out also. I just think what it must make them feel like and I shudder to think what kind of mood I'd be in if my body was a rollercoaster all day long.

    If she has multiple highs and lows everyday I'd say that might be your culprit. Being so new though I found that was the worse time to try and control BS's. It does get a little better though....:)
     
  6. Abuchanan

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    That makes alot of sense. I know like last night she was at her fathers and she called me crying her eyes out and it boiled down to her daddy did not go to the store and buy her any more snacks. (she had some just not what she wanted at the time). She was saying that it was not fair for her sister and cousin to get to eat her snacks because they could eat whatever they wanted and she couldnt. So it could be realization. But also her BG was 387 at 5pm and when she called me 8pm it was 132. So maybe it is BG related.
     
  7. zimbie45

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    reality could be hitting, and she is going to be angry... Have you contacted JDRF yet, also check with your endo office. they may have a child life counsler taht may be able to help her adjust to this... ITs so much just for us adults to handles, and even harder for kids.. i have great suggestions, but mainly for little kids.. like if she still likes stuffed animals, let her give her animals shots... there are several great older kids realted books, CWD main page has a link for suggested books, maybe one more in her age group.. JDRf you can ask for a mentor family, and they can find one in your area that also has kids her age... they also have a bag of hope which has a teddy bear in it..... For summer time. look in a diabetes camp for your area.. ( cwd has links for this as well on the main page)..... American diabetes associate has something called a wizard kit, its a fun kit for parentes adn kids wiht fun activies, lots of learning things.. great all around


    hope some of this helps
     
  8. Abuchanan

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    What is JDRF?
     
  9. Momof4gr8kids

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    JDRF = Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

    They offer a ton of info, and resorces

    www.jdrf.org
     
  10. MrsBadshoe

    MrsBadshoe Super Moderator

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    1. Definately think it could be related to her BS if it was 387 during the melt down.

    2. She has a valid point. If her sister and cousin get to eat her snacks and there aren't any left of her favorites when she wants a snack then I think the adults should do one of two things a) limit the amount of snacks of your dd's that others are allowed to eat b) go get her the snack when they run out. Their days are so overwhelming, especially in the beginning I made sure that my kids each got preferential treatment over the others during the first few months.
     
  11. MamaC

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    I have been trying to convince Tom's teachers that it's not only the highs or the lows that affect him in school - it's more the fluctuation throughout the day that affects him. Doesn't even have to be extreme highs - but the change from pre-lunch (almost always low) to post-lunch is a devil for him.

    I agree that the BG levels, along with the natural progression after the diagnosis (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance) may be causing her to act out. The diagnosis, after all, leads us to a sort of grief. It is a loss of what we knew to be normal. I know that it has affected me; I can only imagine how it affects the patient.

    As a veteran of having "special" foods around for special diets (celiac and now diabetic), I am absolutely adamant about family and guests keeping those special foods reserved for the kids they are meant for. (Just as I am adamant that NO ONE but me can finish the Coke ;) .) The end result of that is that my celiac daughter is discinclined to ever share her food with anyone, which has had some social drawbacks :p but overall it keeps everyone well-stocked and happy!

    Becky
     
  12. Hoping4theCureinWV

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    Both the highs and the swings can cause irritable behavior. My son had the same reaction initially with snacks and food in general. I think the kids feel so deprived at first that they inclined to hide the snacks that they can have so that others cannot eat them. It takes time, patience and lots of understanding to work through. Maybe a new rule for everyone involved that they cannot take the last of the sugar free jello or whichever snacks she likes that are acceptable. That might make her feel special in a good way rather than a negative way. It is a lot to cope with at first (and thereafter).
     
  13. bethdou

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    It could also be the reality is sinking in. Meghan was 8 at dx, and was good as gold for the first couple of weeks. Then she turned into a screaming banshee - I swore she was possessed. It sure as heck wasn't my same girl.

    After a few massive meltdowns, I called the endo's office and talked to the child life specialist and the social worker. We started going in to meet with them every week; they gave Meghan time to talk about whatever she wanted, and started (gently) trying to teach her that she has to deal with it. We ended up getting her into a counselor as well; turns out that she has T2D, so they had a lot of issues that they could relate on.

    If you contact JDRF you may be able to find another child close to you who also has D. It made a huge impact on Meghan to find other girls who also have it but are going on about their lives just the same. I think it made her feel "normal" again, after suddenly feeling so totally different.

    All that being said, BG swings are also the devil on mood and behavior! So there are a lot of possible factors you are dealing with....none of which are very easy to deal with!

    {{{{hugs}}}}} for you and Makaela. If she wants to talk to another 9 year old who has d, you can contact me. We can try to get them hooked up, though Makaela may not be at the stage where she is willing to talk about it yet. Meghan still doesn't say much to "outsiders", but she will open up to other kids with D at support group meetings and such. I try to get her around other kids with diabetes as much as I can, just so she can see that she is perfectly normal, just like they all are.
     
  14. cassandra

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    oh man. i used to get SOOOOO moody (well still do...) when my blood sugar would be high or low or rapidly changing. worse yet though, noone ever told me or my parents that blood sugars would do that to you. people just thought i was a brat!:rolleyes:
     
  15. Mama Belle

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    My daughter was diagnosed 3 weeks after she turned four. The first day or two wasn't too terrible, but after that she completely wigged out. She would lock herself in her closet and try to hurt herself (biting herself and pulling out her own hair). She was upset all of the time, but acted out much more when high. I think the fluctuations definitely played a role, but she was just plain angry that this was happening to her. I did the best thing I could, which was to be there to listen to her and comfort her and provide her with stability.

    This whole thing is completely life changing, as all of us parents know too well. But if we are feeling the stress of it, I can't even to begin to comprehend what it must be like for these kids to make that kind of an adjustment. The following two years at around the same time as diagnosis, she went through the anger and acting out all over again. I think she connected her birthday with her diagnosis, so when she had another birthday it brought back all of those feelings of anxiety. Fortunately, she is nearing her 9th birthday and those days are long gone, all she cares about now is figuring out what to plan for her birthday party.

    I wouldn't discount the role that blood sugars play, but I also wouldn't underestimate the toll that this has taken on your daughter.

    Good luck. It will get better!
     
  16. Abuchanan

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    Thanks for everyones input!
     

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