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Maddening comment of the day

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by funnygrl, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. Our3girls

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    I think you met my SIL. LOL Grrr I love peoples ignorance. I know I knew NOTHING about diabetes before our dx, however I would have NEVER given people my opinion either! This is my biggest and probably only pet peeve about peoples lack of knowledge. If you don't live with it, face it every minute of every day, read books specific to type 1, went to educational classes about type 1... then don't try to give me your advice :D When I talk to my dd about a cure and what it would mean to her, she does not say no more shots, finger pricks... she says no more people making their stupid comments :( Ok rant over!!! Have a good day.
     
  2. mmc51264

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    This is why I am going into DIABETIC nursing education. I lost my job as a teacher and I am going to school to be a nurse. I am mortified at how little the instructors, as well as other nurses, know about diabetes. The only one I have had that was any good was one who was Type1.
    It is going to be my mission to educate as many nurses as I can. I love it when people tel me to cinsult with my child's school nurse regarding his D. She doesn't understand the differences between T1 and T2. Great.
     
  3. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    98% of the Medical profession knowd very little about each illness, They can't, it would take them forever in school, and we'd have no one with basic knowledge, however a good provider will listen and learn with you. When I was in nursing school, we learned the basics only.
     
  4. ashleesmommy

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    I'm a nurse and I don't know how many times other nurses have asked if my DD ate too much sugar!! I always explain to them the difference between type 1 and type 2, but they just don't get it!! One of the nurses has a husband with "diabetes", but when I asked which kind she said she didn't know!! Obviously type 2!! I must admit, I didn't know much about type 1 myself, but I also wouldn't make a stupid comment on something I didn't know anything about!! I'm glad you were able to correct her!
     
  5. Becky Stevens mom

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    Oh good for you! yep, she said correct her if she was wrong and she was extremely wrong and just plain silly! Ive heard of 6 month old babies with pumps and I really doubt that they could manage the controls on a pump yet:p But seriously, that is the only way to make sure that their tiny bodies get the exact amount of insulin and not too much. I think the pump is really good for toddlers and preschoolers who need tiny amounts that is difficult to measure via syringe and they most certainly shouldnt be expected to be able to work a pump yet
     
  6. JenniferM

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    I found the thread ... and I am finding it very insulting. I find it incredible that they have no understanding of a 504 Plan. I find it mind boggling!
     
  7. Lisa P.

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    I think this is a very important thing to keep in mind. Because diabetes is not the only medical condition out there. I find it a blessing, of sorts, that I've learned how totally in the dark nurses and doctors can be about diabetes. It really drives home to me that they aren't little gods and that medical opinions about anything, not just diabetes, need to be listened to critically, second opinions need to be sought, you need to do your own research. Mostly what I've learned is that the best doctors and nurses are not those that know the most because the above is true -- even the ones that know a lot know only a small percentage. The best doctor is one who is willing to say, "I'm not sure about that, I'll find out and get back to you." It's my new gold standard. :D
     
  8. joan

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    So true... As a nurse I can't tell you the amount of times people say to me , " You're a nurse you must know about this" usually they show me a rash or tell me to diagnose a broken bone without an xray. I usually say, " I don't know much about skin diseases or that needs an xray." People always expect me to know everything about everything. " You must know about this"' and they name some rare genetic disease" my response, "I don't know what that is" I alway end up feeling stupid and you can tell they are thinking, "she's no nurse"


    If someone is having a heart attack I will know what to do, dress a wound no problem, understand many common diseases sure , start an IV, etc, etc. I am not a cardiologist, neurologist. oncologist etc..but people think I know everything about all these things.

    Now if someone asks me about d forgetttaboutit...I'm unstoppable.

    So as one of those health care workers I cannot agree with Lisa more strongly.
     
  9. Shely

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    Hello,

    Just a little FYI

    As a parent of a pumper, I can say that a child does not have to be old enough to operate the pump before receiving it. My daughter received her pump when she was 5 because she was a good candidate for a pump. It is the doctor who decides if a child is a good candidate based on the stability of the condition among other things. I met parents of toddlers that have insulin pumps and have had them for a while.

    I can say that in my daughter's school it is required that the school nurse perform the bolus for lunch, any snacks and even high glucose checks. She received training from the pump company representative.
     
  10. Mom of 3 BOYS

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    As I speak more and more to people I find it that even some doctors and nurses know very little about type 1 diabetes...

    there was a woman in our pump class about 28 years old who was told by her general doctor she was type 2:eek: put her on pills for a few months untll i guess she stopped honeymooning and went into a dka and was in the hospital! the doctor told her she was too "old" for type 1!!!!!

    a nurse told me once that i checked my son's sugar way too much! that once to twice a day should be more than enough!!!:confused:

    Unless you live with this everyday you really have no idea.... we need to educate people as much as we can! including our health professionals!!!!!
    (and change the name of type 2 to something else:p)
     
  11. Lisa P.

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    I know a lady who was misdiagnosed as Type 2, also, even though she had Type 1 in the immediate family. She was in her late 40s, so they just assumed Type 2 even though she was bg 500 on admittance (I think).

    They treated her like Type 2 for several months, also, so all her "training" was for Type 2. She was on a set insulin and carb amount each day, 45 carbs per meal, and no fat or sugar, told she could only eat a little piece of candy if she swapped it out for carbs (like her apple). When they switched her diagnosis, they never retrained her. So she continued to eat like that. She was hungry and tired all the time and went low not infrequently. She never tested after meals, only before (hours later) so she was convinced that she almost never went above 180 because she never saw a bg number when she was actually digesting carbs. Added to this, she wouldn't go back to get an A1C done because she had it in her head that she'd get berated for not following the rules well enough if the A1C wasn't good.

    These are the cases I find hardest to face. This lady wasn't interested in anything I had to say(I learned very quickly that she didn't want to know anything about how we did things, since she knew my kid sometimes went into the 300s and she never ;)did, it was obvious to her that there was no point). The doctors and nurses had given her instructions and she by golly wasn't going to veer or question (although she was going to hide!). She clearly didn't buy half of what they told her, deep down, but at the same time since they were the medical pros she had to follow, like a good girl. This made me very angry at her "team". Diabetes is hard enough without medical bullies.

    I will disclaim, though, that it's a beautiful, beautiful, beautiful thing to find a medical person who either really understands well or is really open and listening and works hard with you. They are priceless.
     
  12. Bigbluefrog

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    Did you say they are handing out FREE pumps at Walmart!!! :)

    dang it I missed it ! :p

    Oh I am glad you educated the future nurses of our society...nothing frustrates me more than ignorant medical professionals.
     
  13. Bigbluefrog

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    Say what huh?:eek:

    And she would be giving you this advice because she is an expert?

    And this is one of those times you want to say....blankly blankly blank. How come I didn't get my diploma out of a cereal box?:p

    I believe there is a whole section in anatomy and physiology on diabetes..looking for what it says...holy crap..no wonder...it doesn't say much. Diabetes is an autoimmune disease, nothing on DKA, BG rates, monitoring, symptoms, signs.

    Maybe to address the ignorance a proactive approach to the one writing the text books.
     
  14. funnygrl

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    Not future- current :eek:
     
  15. alongoria

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    Nursing Student

    I am a nursing student, and my daughter has been diabetic for 7 years. Let me tell you it is scary how little is taught, and how it is taught. I had a friend you just graduated from nursing school last year, and she thought my daughters pump was implanted and instead of calling it a pump she called it her artificial pancreas. She had no clue!!

    I even ask questions to my instructors and watch them squirm when they don't know the answer. Makes me wonder what else they are teaching me wrong....
     
  16. alongoria

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    Oh and this too

    This semester they were still teaching about inhaled insulin. I had to tell them it was taken off the market and they looked stunned....
     
  17. kiwimum

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    I was talking to a nurse the other day - been in the profession for years (older lady).
    She was asking how the pump worked. Questions I don't mind, assumptions I do. After I explained it basically, she then told me it was obvious that when he is low, he just needs MORE insulin....:eek:
    Needless to say, all I could think was that thank goodness she wasn't taking care of Tyler!

    I get that they don't know everything and can't possibly, but a few basics would be helpful!

    And as for the child not being old enough for the pump because they can't do it themselves, I guess injections could fall into that category too. :rolleyes:
     
  18. MamaBear

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    I was seen recently by a nurse practioner for my newTMJ/TMD. We were discussing pain killers and I was trying to explain that I cannot take them because of caring for my son. Pain killers leave me loopy and I don't want to sleep through or screw up a middle of the night blood check or correction. She tells me that endos shouldn't be telling me to check my son's blood sugar in the middle of the night. I tried to explain and she interrupted me saying she knows all about diabetes and that with these new fast acting insulins like humalog, middle of the night checks are not necessary. :rolleyes: I think I'll keep checking anyway.
     
  19. deafmack

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    I sure hope the person knows how to sign. :D
     
  20. deafmack

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    I think we all get those kind of statements. I know many thought that a person will not have high blood sugars if they hae type 2 but I remember reading about this guy whose blood sugars were 1800 and he was diagnosed with type 2. I remember reading his story and saying WOW!. The guy is lucky to be alive.
    I hate it too when people think eating sugar is what causes diabetes or some other misconception. Oh and my all time favorite. "You take insulin? Well then you don't take care of your diabetes very well, do you?" My response, "Well you don't know anything about diabetes do you? Mind you this was said to a nurse where I go.
     

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