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Lost trust in teacher.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by MMMMMMM, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. MMMMMMM

    MMMMMMM Approved members

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    So I posted previously about my sons obsessive checking of his blood sugar for the last few weeks but I felt that this was a slightly different subject however with a direct link to that one.

    When we realized that the very frequent bg checking was becoming an issue I thought that it had something to do with him recently starting school but couldn't pinpoint the problem... last year (and the 1st week or so of this one) he did great.

    Over the weekend M was sick and told my husband and myself on 2 separate occasions how worried he was because, since he was sick, he wasn't doing a good job taking care of his diabetes. We reminded him that it was still our job to take care of him and to make sure he was ok.

    So I was brainstorming why he would feel this way and remembered that a few weeks ago - around when the bg obsession began - that my son told me his teacher sent him to the nurse from recess, without a chaperone, when he was low. I did talk to her afterwards and let her know that someone needs to take him every time he feels low regardless of where they are. That it's not safe for him to go alone. She seemed surprised. :/

    This weekend I brought this up to M and asked him how he felt about her sending him alone. He said he felt bad and like she didn't care what happened to him. He told me he doesn't really trust her to take care of him if something were to happen. This just makes me feel so sad for him and also angry. This wasn't a problem last year and he had 2 different teachers after his diagnoses. He felt safe with both of them.

    It also makes me question if she does know how to care for him! I know I already talked to her about sending him to the nurse with a chaperone but should we sit down and make sure she really understands the seriousness of all of this? Let her ask any questions she might have?

    How do we repair the damage to his trust in people who are supposed to be caring for him?
     
  2. wilf

    wilf Approved members

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    You start by meeting with the teacher, letting her know your sons concerns, and briefing her in detail on what you and he need from her. She clearly hadn't understood what was required, so you need to build up her knowledge base. You want to try to do this in a constructive manner - take as much time as is needed for this, and be encouraging! :cwds:

    Once you are comfortable that the teacher knows what is needed, you then tell your son that you have been working with her and that she can now do a better job of taking care of his needs. You go on to tell him that we all make mistakes, and that it is important to forgive one another when we make them.

    Good luck. :cwds:
     
  3. Christopher

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    Just wanted to echo what Wilf said. Especially the part about approaching the teacher in a collaborative, encouraging way.

    Good luck.
     
  4. kim5798

    kim5798 Approved members

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    Agreed with previous posters.

    Do you have a 504 plan? Seems like the school needs more direction. Definitely seems that the teacher needs more education on diabetes. My policy was always to go in with a collaborative mindset. In all of the K-12 years, and my kid had all of them with diabetes, we only had one teacher that was a bad one regarding diabetes, and she was bad about other issues, such as ADHD as well. All but that one teacher genuinely wanted information to help take care of my child. Her story is one for another time...I'm sure I posted about it here on CWD years ago.
    You have to remember that literally no one except those of us with type 1 kids, know much about type 1. The little they know about diabetes is always type 2. They simply need education. Most people are good at heart, especially those who educate our children for a living. I have to say, I grew up with 2 of my mother's sisters with type 1 for my whole life & we are a very close family. Sadly, no one in our extended family knew much about diabetes except, 'she is having a reaction & needs sugar" until my child was diagnosed. Even my one aunt, her husband learned so much more about type 1 AFTER my daughter was diagnosed at age 3, which his wife had had & he had been living with for over 20 years. Probably because it was the center of our life, lol, but it became more of a subject we talked about.
     
  5. MMMMMMM

    MMMMMMM Approved members

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    We do have a 504 in place and the nurse and previous teachers have been great. This one has missed a snack time as well as sending him w/out the escort. I was picking him up after school one day and he was feeling low. As he was checking his bg she began reprimanding him about behavior that happened earlier in the day. His was at the time 54. I let her know that when he's feeling low it's really not appropriate to talk to him about poor behavior, to wait until he's feeling better. Kids just can't take that information in when they're feeling bad like that (and they don't need the added stress). :(

    Each issue has not been repeated so she is definitely listening and trying.

    I did reach out to the district nurse who is going to be working more closely with his teacher. I think she can work in a more collaborative way right now because I'm rather emotional. This is just really upsetting to me. I don't have a lot of experience since he was just dx'd this year.

    ~

    My son also has ADHD and I'm wondering if you find things especially difficult with the combination. M has impulsive/ hyperactive type without attention deficit. When he was 1st diagnosed we thought it would be much harder because he has an oppositional streak but it's been easier than expected. But it's still harder than I think it would be with a child who doesn't have both.

     
  6. kim5798

    kim5798 Approved members

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    I think my post was misunderstood. my child had issue with diabetes. other kids in the class had issue with ADHD. TEACHER was a problem for all of them. She wasn't good with issues.
     

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