- advertisement -

Letting our kids be kids

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Lisa P., Aug 19, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Mama Belle

    Mama Belle Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
    4,540
    Like I said before in this thread our 30 day average number of tests per day is 14. Our endo didn't think that was too much. Last endo appointment Samantha's A1c went up quite a bit (6.8 to 7.5) and her average number of tests per day were closer to 8. This appointment her A1c was down to 7.1. Samantha is going through crazy fluctuations due to growth and puberty, no two days look exactly the same for us, no matter what we do. For us 14 tests per day is what we need to do right now to get better control. And our endo has no problem with this. Samantha isn't scarred by the testing, in fact like Scott said she rarely notices when I test her. We do what we need to do to take care of her diabetes so that she can be a kid and enjoy life. And we are trying to get a CGMS right now so we can have better more accurate trends with less testing so we can try and figure out what is going on with her. Everyone is different, what works for me may not work for you and vice versa.
     
  2. Karenwith4

    Karenwith4 Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,442
    FWIW our ped team thinks we should Em between 10 - 15 times/day if we feel it is warranted. They think more is better if it helps with control and there isn't any adverse affects for the child with respect to their feelings about D. They want a minimum of 9 tests a day and that doesn't cover any tests during exercise, or any tests for her feeling lows or exhibiting signs of lows. I can think of plenty of typical days when we test 15 times a day - every single one of them warranted whether it is because she's very active, she's showing signs of lows, she says she feels low etc.
    Our ped wrote a prescription for 20 strips a day for insurance purposes.
     
  3. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Messages:
    7,308

    Not calling you out personally, you were just closest to the end that made this statement, but I know that it was also made above by another parent who said "he isn't phased by the test".

    Emma isn't phased physically and doesn't make a comment about the testing at the time I do it. But right now, I cannot tell what the adverse affects of long-time, excessive testing can do to her. So, I think that when we all think about "adverse affects", its more than just whether they cry and fight that specific test.

    Again, its a balance of physical health and emotional health. We can't see the effects of emotional health now, but often the effects of the emotional issues are much deeper and more difficult to address.

    Its finding the right balance - and being willing to understand that what may "work" for you now might not be the right long term answer, and being willing to know the difference in what's best for YOU (the parent) needing to know and what's best for the child (physical and emotional health)

    I saw an episode of Nanny 911 last night that was interesting in this same regard - the mother had all of her kids and her dog sleep in the bed with them every night (the oldest was 7, I think). The Nanny finally got her to understand that why she was doing that wasn't for her KIDS, but it was for HER. SHE wanted to snuggle the kids. And the kids were acting out because of HER attachment issues. The Nanny taught her ways to get her attachment needs met and still give the kids what's best for them.

    Its the same here.
     
  4. Darryl

    Darryl Approved members

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    4,313
    Heide,

    I am also the a parent of a 10 year old girl, and I think you have this 100% right!
    No two days are the same. 14 tests sounds like a lot, but really, that's only once
    every 90 minutes, which as you know is not nearly enough to catch all of the sudden
    rises and falls. Achieving A1C of 7.1 with a girl this age without a CGM is terrific and
    you should be very proud of that.

    It's important for kids to be kids, it's also important for them to have the best shot
    at being healthy adults, and in that regard, 14 BG's a day until you get a CGM is
    perfectly reasonable if that's what is needed to maintain a good A1C.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2008
    Mama Belle likes this.
  5. aishlingt

    aishlingt Approved members

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    17
    As my daughter is only new to this we test about 12 times a day. If my DD had her way she would do it ALOT more. I was really worried about her obsessing over it but she says she likes to know how food/activities/insulin affects her levels!! I really liked the comment about climbing a tree to do it as last week she tested while hanging upside down on monkey bars:D:D:D
     
  6. Karenwith4

    Karenwith4 Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,442
    I agree completely that it is about the kid - not the parent.
    But the people that can determine whether or not the child is being adversely affected have to be close enough to the kids and the parents to know what's what. It isn't something that can be determined by some random person on a message board taking a small sliver of information out of the larger picture and making a judgement about it.

    And while I know you aren't calling me out personally, I do know the testing isn't affecting Emily because my husband and I talk to her about it. We also check in with each other on it to make sure we are grounded in why we do what we do. I talk to my MIL and FIL, and my close homeschooling girlfriends about how they think she is doing it because they care for her regularly and are very close to her and I know they would all be honest with us if they saw a change in her. Emily is an easy going kid. Not much phases her but when something does she clearly communicates it.

    We work at being mindful connected parents. I trust my instincts about my kids - they have never let me down - and those instincts that we all have deserve to be respected by ourselves and just as importantly by others.
     
    Mama Belle and twodoor2 like this.
  7. Mama Belle

    Mama Belle Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
    4,540
    Honestly, my daughter is not phased by testing, inwardly or outwardly. She's 10 and speaks her mind and isn't afraid to say when something is hurting her or taking it's toll. My kid is a pretty well-rounded, well-adjusted kid who has far more issues with her peers than she does with her diabetes. It is easy to sit back and suggest that you think we could be somehow inflicting adverse effects on our kids by testing a lot, but you don't know us and our specific circumstances. My DD likes to test because it is something she can do to take care of herself. Very rarely do you hear me telling she has to test, she tests a lot on her own, that's her choice. If she were obsessing about it or doing it out of fear, then yeah, I'd be worried. But she isn't, she is trying to be responsible and manage her disease the only way she knows how, by gathering information. As I mentioned before, spending a lot of time at the nurse during school, is something that has taken its toll and we are changing things this year to make that work better for her, but testing is so not an issue at all.
     
    Karenwith4 likes this.
  8. zeb'smom

    zeb'smom Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
    Messages:
    994
    Okay now FINALLY having read all the posts here (and all the one's from the other thread) I have a few things I've got to get off my chest.

    1. I am not good at the math/analysis side of D care and find those here that are tremendously helpful, so thanks to you all.

    2. I have been a member here since January 2006 right after Zeb was dx'ed. (I don't post much compared to many so some of you newer folks my not 'know' me.) I have seen many 'issue' arise, folks feeling get hurt...parenting can be a touchy subject and when you add D to the mix things can get explosive, we all need to be careful with the words we choose.

    3. Caspi....you are a valuable member of the CWD family and I say this to you like I would tell a friend she has food in her teeth, not to hurt feeling or call you out but just so you know...I found it a bit hurtful that you said again and again that 15 test a day is excessive, when Zeb was first dx'ed at 18 months we tested that much everyday (for months) and more on days when things weren't 'right'. We didn't do it just to fill in our logs and graphs, we did it because he couldn't tell us how he felt and we had no other way of knowing what was going on with him. He is 4 now and we test between 8 and 13 times a day. That's what works for us. In my mind it's just unfair to make any sort of blanket statement about diabetes care because there are too many variables involved. I met a woman recently who was 'THRILLED' that her 15yo dd was testing 3 to 4 times a day, this in my mind sounds terrible not nearly enough, but considering that just a few months ago this child was testing less than once a day this is a huge improvement. So while it seems obvious that 3 tests a day is too few or 15 seems like too many you just can't know all the reasons or rational. I truly understood your meaning in the original post and mostly agree with you but just had to share my view on this issue within the issue.

    4. Every parent (or teen or grandparent or what have you) here is a valuable member of the CWD family and should be praised for there efforts to best understand and treat their child's (or what have you) diabetes, however it works best for them.

    Just my very long 2 cents
    Robyn
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2008
    Ivan's Mum likes this.
  9. caspi

    caspi Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,134
    Robyn, I am so sorry if I hurt your feelings as that was not my intention. As I have said previously, and many, many others have agreed with me privately, I think that 15 times a day is excessive. But as I also said previously, this is just my opinion and if what you are doing works for you and you are comfortable with that, then that's great! :cwds:
     
  10. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,430
    I technically am a kid/young adult with D, so my opinions may be a little bit skewed.... I am a bit OCD with my D care, too.

    I think that testing 15x a day is not that bad-considering that the tests only take 5 seconds. I don't think it adversely harms a child-as long you are not criticizing their scores/numbers. Every D kid gets bad numbers from time to time, some are their fault and some are not. All that the parent needs to do is take corrective action against the high or low-give glucose or give insulin.

    When I was diagnosed with D, the meters took 45 seconds to give a result, and my first meter took 10 microliters of blood for each test(most meters now take between .3-1.5 microliters of blood). That was quite an inconvenience for a 5 year old diabetic.

    However, the testing definitely did not harm me. I had to do it. It was just a part of life.

    Also, as a kid, I had to follow dietary restrictions that are no longer used by the ADA. I was not allowed to eat certain foods because they were too sugary. I had to eat a certain amount of carbs at meals, whether I was hungry or not. Although this was crappy, it was the card I was dealt. I had to deal with it no matter what.

    I don't think kids with D face any limitations in terms of what they can and can't do (in reference to the OP). I think planning and modifications, including slight dietary substitutions and insulin adjustments (ex. pre-bolusing) work well enough to ensure that D kids are still much like normal kids.
     
    Darryl likes this.
  11. twodoor2

    twodoor2 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    6,440
    Caspi,
    I don't know how many times a day you test your child, but if someone said, "well IMO I don't think that's enough" - you wouldn't be offended?
     
  12. caspi

    caspi Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,134
    Marsha, quite frankly, NO. I do what I feel is best for my child and feel very comfortable about it. I don't back pedal and say one thing and then do another. And for the record, I DO test my child frequently. Just not 15 times a day, every day.
     
  13. Karenwith4

    Karenwith4 Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,442
    That's great. No one should judge you for that. We'd just like the same respect from you.
    Karen
     
  14. Darryl

    Darryl Approved members

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    4,313
    Thank you Monica... I think your comments bring a lot of credibility and important perspective to this discussion.
     
  15. Mom2Will

    Mom2Will Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,051
    Thank you Monica, I, as a parent, appreciate your input especially for letting me see how far diabetes care has come, in my eyes, a short period of time!! You have given to me so much hope for the future that I can't say thank you enough!!!;)
     
  16. caspi

    caspi Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,134
    You see, this is what I don't understand. I'm not judging anyone. I'm simply stating my opinion. If someone feels they are being judged, then perhaps they need to look at why they are feeling that way. As I just said to Marsha, if someone said to me that they didn't think I was testing enough, I'd tell them that was their opinion and that would be that. I wouldn't feel the need to explain my actions......
     
  17. twodoor2

    twodoor2 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    6,440
    Fair enough. However, I do believe many people would be offended. What does "back pedaling" have to do with this question?:confused:
     
  18. caspi

    caspi Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,134
    You have stated a number of times in this thread that you don't test that often, however in a previous post you stated that you receive 450 test strips a month and use all of them. That's what I was referring to.
     
  19. twodoor2

    twodoor2 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    6,440
    I know, but that had nothing to do with my last question to you, and I do feel that was a jab added in there.
     
  20. caspi

    caspi Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,134
    OK, I'm confused. When I said you were back pedaling, I meant that you previously stated you used 450 strips a month. In this post, that changed and you said you don't test that often. That's what I meant by back pedaling. I'm not sure what you are saying about adding a "jab". :confused:
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice