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Late Night Snacks For Big Boy

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by DavidN, Aug 10, 2016.

  1. DavidN

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    Just wondering how parents handle late night [STRIKE]snacks[/STRIKE] meals. Dinner was at 7pm, it's 11pm and son is heading off to bed and is "I'M SO HUNGRY". Last night, 11:15pm he throws down a PBJ and a glass of milk. 55 carbs. Bam! "Good night Dad" (he did bolus). So lots of thoughts going through my head.

    Selfish Dad - "Do you realize what my night is going to look like?!! Argh!!!"

    Sympathetic Dad - "I had a late night snack a few nights ago myself. T1D is unfair enough. Let the boy eat and I'll suck it up."

    Practical Dad - "No doubt T1D sucks, but can't budge here. After 9pm it's no or very-low carbs only. He'll be off to college before I know it and it's time to instill good habits".

    I know Practical Dad is the way to go, the problem is son hates Practical Dad and too much pushing will only trigger anger and rebellion. You can draw an analogy here with a kid stomping his feet in a toy store, but this is different. At least it feels different. We draw plenty of lines. But he's 13, growing like a weed, full bore puberty, strong-willed, and in danger, in my opinion, of all out T1D rebellion.

    So what do you do? We've got cheese, meats, carrots etc ... but he's not impressed. Any suggestions on decent snacks that may help out here.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Beach bum

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    If it's not a regular habit, I'd just acknowledge and move on :)
    If it's becoming a regular thing, I'd go for protein, low carb.
     
  3. Dad_in_Canada

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    Our post-9pm snacks are often bean chips ("Beanitos") or peanuts. Both are low'ish carbs (bean chips are certainly lower carbs than potato chips) and high protein. Both seem to satisfy DS's snack crave. He's not interested in meat, cheese or veggies late at night.
     
  4. Sprocket

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    My daughter always has a substantial bedtime snack. Toast and pb and a glass of milk or warm ovaltine. As long as we are confident in our I:C ratio and take into account blood sugar at that time to figure out if it will be a full dose, half dose etc., we have been fine.
     
  5. Mimikins

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    I have a really large bedtime "snack" (it often ends up being the largest amount of carbs I consume in a meal -about 40-60g net carbs over a 1-1.5 hour grazing period). As long as I accurately carb count and bolus for it, I'm typically good (I have been having recent issues with taking too much insulin for my snacks, going low, and then rebounding). Right now, my typical bedtime "snack" is about 1.5 cups of fruit (strawberries/frozen blueberries/frozen cranberries with a ton of sweetener.), unsweetened warmed almond/cashew milk (sweetened with sweetener), a 100-calorie pack of popcorn (sweetened with a ton of sweetener and cinnamon. I guess you can tell that I love my sweetener), and either 20-28g of super dark chocolate (85-100% cacao), a Quest bar, or Greek yogurt (depending on how short I am in reaching my fat/protein macros).

    If you're looking for low-carb snacks, Quest bars are pretty good (though they're a tad bit expensive). They're about 2-4g of net carbs per bar, have about 20g protein, and come in some pretty good-tasting flavors (a lot of people say they're really good microwaved for 10-15 seconds).
     
  6. Brhodes

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    The good habit part is he bolused. That's the important part and wouldn't worry much about the rest. I think it's good to occasionally discuss the benefits of a low carb late night snack, but if you hound and restrict now, when he does leave the house all bets are off. I can't imagine too many college students forgoing the 2 am pizza and tacos for peanuts and celery even if they are T1D.
     
  7. kim5798

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    Well in our house we try not to make a big deal about it. What others said about seeing which dose is going to work, dose & move on. Yes at times, it is going to make parenting more of a challenge, if you get up to test. You have the dexcom to alarm if he is high or low from it. I don't think arguing about food is smart. I mean, I would prefer he ate a sandwich as opposed to a sundae, but that is not always going to work. From seeing friends experience( who restrict food of their diabetic child after certain hours) as opposed to my own, I will take them bolusing for what they eat & not sneaking food. I do think it is a good idea to suggest a lower carb option or higher fiber, etc. but I agree with prior poster, that when their friends are eating pizza at 2am, KNOW my child is not going to opt for string cheese. Hopefully he will not like the way he feels when high. My daughter is this way & so I know she will take insulin.

    Boys eat A LOT. My non d son is now 20, and I tell you, he may be a thin kid, but he can EAT. They are growing.
     
  8. georgia

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    I say let him eat. He is being responsible by bolusing, and diabetes sucks enough without carrots at midnight.
     
  9. quiltinmom

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    Well said. Sometimes I frame things as "when you are older you may want to..." I'm hoping it will sink in. As he ages and matures, there's a good chance he will begin to make better food choices all around, but to force him into it now will probably get in the way of that. It will "stick" a lot more when it's their idea/choice. This way you can combine practical dad and sympathetic dad, and selfish dad doesn't deserve the time of day so we can leave him out. :)

    I get how frustrating it is when they don't see what it is we are trying to do. Now and then Ds reminds me that although I know more about diabetes than many, I still haven't experienced it, I don't know what it's like to always have to be on top of it. At least I get a break now and then when he goes places. It's all about perspective.

    As for snack ideas....unfortunately I got nothin. Here we don't do late night eating habitually, but sometimes there is food before bed, usually a brownie or ice cream or bread with meat and cheese. It varies a lot. I think food is the least of my night time worries with a teen going through puberty.

    Another thought I had is to try to get him to go to bed before he has time to be starving again, sidestepping the problem altogether. Don't tell him this is what you're doing of course...


    Good luck! Hope this helps.
     
  10. Mish

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    I think all your "dads" are normal and fine because they're all very valid points of view. I's go with "dad of teenager" dad though (or in my case, mom of teenager). Take the diabetes out of it. What would you do? It was easy for me because mine wasn't my first child, so I had done teenagerhood with another child already, so I knew what I was ok with and what I wasn't ok with. It was easy for me to see these were normal teenage things, without diabetes.

    And like someone else said, he bolused (checked maybe?) and that's like half your battle. At 16, my son has some weird diabetes habits, but he boluses for everything he eats, and that really is what's important right now. So maybe he didn't check all day at school. He bolused for his food properly, even the WAG for the musubi someone gave him that's going to make his CGM look like a rollercoaster.
     
  11. DavidN

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    As always, all very good advice. Him wanting a snack is very normal. And yes he bolused, so not a big deal at all. D aside, he's been a bit of a teen challenge lately and sometimes I slip up and mix the two. Thanks to all.
     
  12. nebby3

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    IMO sympathetic dad is where you want to be.
     
  13. Mish

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    it's always a good idea to give the Joe S video a watch. http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/video/JoeS2.htm

    He's got such great insights into teens with type 1. It's so important to remember that just because they have diabetes there is nothing to say you can't still parent them, punish them, or do whatever is normal for your family.
     
  14. jenm999

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    Late to the party. I have a fast growing five-foot-tall 8 year old (9 next week) eating me out of house and home, and a husband who reminds me that he used to eat an entire box of cereal or four sandwiches as a young teen. In other words, BOYS EAT. If you do not want him eating late at night for whatever reason, then I think he needs a larger dinner. My son does not like ultimatums, but seems receptive to the respect-your-intelligence explanation: hey, let's look at your graph together, this is what happens when you graze, or eat more when you're already high; let's try eating the same amount on one bolus, or finding a satisfying lower carb option for round 2. Maybe, if he really wants another late night meal, he'd be open to setting an alarm for midnight and giving himself a correction?
     

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