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Lantus???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by SugarBooger, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. SugarBooger

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    My son has been dx'd since 2004. He is on Novolin (N and R) but his dr. has mentioned going to Lantus to help regulate his sugars. The regimen he is on now, he has a set insulin and has to eat certain # of carbs to cover the insulin. There are days when he is still hungry and days he just doesn't want to eat snacks or eat as much at dinner. From what the dr. says, it seems to free up his lifestyle a little bit. No more forcing him to eat or getting up at 6am, every morning (even on weekends and summer) to take a shot. That he would only take one when he eats. Any one have any experience with this, any advice?? Thank you so much. Your input is greatly appreciated!!!
     
  2. Chase's mom

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    My son was just DX Saturday and he is on Lantus. I give him a shot every night before he goes to bed and it is supposed to last 24 hrs. I give him Novolog before meals and check his BS before eating and 2 hrs after. I don't have to wake him for shots. He only gets shots when he eats.I'm VERY new to this so i'm not sure if i helped or not.
     
  3. SugarBooger

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    Yes it does, thank you. Stephen has to eat 6 times a day!!! And he gets 3 shots a day. He has to be woke up to take his shot at 6am (Which he hates) And the eating is sometimes too much for him (And sometimes not enough) It really is hard to deal with sometimes. But thank you for your input! And trust me, it does get easier. You'll have good days and bad days, but more good ones will def. come your way!!!
     
  4. cydnimom

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    I'm just moving my son in this direction - he has finally agreed to take more than two shots per day.

    I'm on this regime myself and it does free up a lot with respect to eating certain amounts and at specific times.

    There are a few things to consider:

    1. Is your son willing to take a shot everytime he eats? This would include most snacks, however, there are times when a small snack can be worked in.

    2. He needs to be able to take the shot without supervision at lunch if he doesn't come home - also needs to be able to calculate carbs and then the carb ratio in calculating how much to take with respect to the short acting insulin.

    3. Lantus/Levemir doesn't necessarily last a full 24 hrs. Sometimes this can be handled by taking the Lantus in the evening rather than the morning so any lapse in the 24 hours can be picked up by the short acting. I myself split the dose basically in half (60/40) in the morning and at supper (approx. 12 hr split).

    I think these are just some of the bigger things to consider. I, myself, wouldn't go back to N and H if you paid me. However, with respect to my son I went with his wishes of only doing two shots/day and have made it work. He is fairly compliant though and doesn't cheat on his eating. I think it is a great way to phase into pumping if you are heading in that direction.
     
  5. kittycatgirl

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    New to Lantus and Love it!

    Hello,
    I posted a few weeks back about lantus.... We just switched and love it. My daughter is 12 and the freedom it gives her is amazing! She eats when she wants (when she is hungry). She hasn't had the lows that we had with NPH. She sleeps late (summer) and next year will have the freedom to participate in school parties instead of feeling left out! She can eat a meal based on her hunger not because she has to.(small or large) We also don't need to worry about the timing of lunch or snack at school. She is older so she won't have a snack next year unless she has gym class. She does have to have an additional shot for lunch but they are small ones and if her numbers are high she can have a little extra insulin to bring the numbers down. The extra shot during the day is a very small thing compared to the huge amount of freedom it brings both you and your child! I hope this helps,
    Dee
     
  6. zimbie45

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    HI,
    when charlize was dx, they gave her teh nph regimin, explained that she had to eat so much at certain times.. keep in mind she was 3... I adv this was a concern... jsut adv that if it becomes a problme then thy will switch her.. 30 min later she was scheaduled for her lunch... they told us to pick from a list and this was how many points she needed... SHe loved mac and cheese, it was the exact # of points she needed so we picked it... THEN she got her dinner plate.. IT WAS HUGE, the amount she need to just cover the insulin was more than the entire box of kraft mac and cheese, i was so mad.. charlize refused to eat. so the entire night the nurses and me where running around the hospital tring to find quick sugars or somethign to cover all the carbs she required... They switched her to lantus/ novalog the next day... IT was the best move we did ( next to going on the pump)... It gave charlzie and us so much more flexiblity and freedom... the extra shot never really phase charlzie at all.. she got a lot of " free snacks" we only had to cover for breakfast/ lunch/ dinner and snacks if they where 15 carbs or so.. she typically got 4-6 shots per day.. Some times it was a hassel it seemed to bring everthing with you, but that was qucikly fixed by switching to the novalog jr pen.. ( also very cost effect too). It was now easy to bring insulin along with us.. charlize got to participate in b-day parties no problem, we got to do the spur of the moment ice cream trips, fun days with out having to be set to clock. We took lantus in the am to cover the nights perfect.. aslo because lantus has a peek at 6 hours we didnt want that peak when we where all sleeping... we never had problmes with highs in the mornign, and if we did and it was s continuous thing, that just ment she needs a bit more lantus,, it made make adjument easy, because we could tell what the problemed insulin ratio was that was causing what ever problem adn could fix it easy. If you cant tell i am all for lantus... I HIGHLY recommend it, specially for toddlers, tweeniers, adn teens.. its also a great move to the pump,, or just go to the pump all together.. it has all these benifis + but that is a whole other post.. Lantus/ novalog is also called the poormans pump.. so it will at least give you an idea if the pump with work for you and if you would like it..
     
  7. georgia

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    I am new to this too. My 3yr old takes one lantus shot in the am after breakfast, then humalog shot after every meal (b, l, d). She can eat essentially what she wants at a meal and then I cover with her humalog. I think the lantus is constant no peaks.
    WE like it so far, but right now I am just doing what I am told and trying to get her to level outl.
     
  8. zimbie45

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    Lantus peak is at about 6 hours after dose, its not a hugh one but its still a peak and if you take it in the am... its peaking at lunch or snack, and you will not even notice it because you already have carbs on board to cover it...
     
  9. sammysmom

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    2. He needs to be able to take the shot without supervision at lunch if he doesn't come home - also needs to be able to calculate carbs and then the carb ratio in calculating how much to take with respect to the short acting insulin.

    Well really if he is in public school the school is responsible for making sure he gets his shot and the right amount...the school is also responsible for providing carb counts for any food that they serve. The parent is responsible for providing info to the school such are i:c ratios and correction factors........the child is not required to do a shot for himself or figure out his own doses if in a public school...

    shannon
     
  10. pookas

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    We are on Lantus and Diluted Humalog. Hunter gets 1 u. Lantus in am and 1/2 u. b4 bed. We found that the Lantus is running out by PM because it's such a small dose, but it's working very well. I asked about Levimer, but the doc said she found out the same thing that it would run out at such a small dose so we didn't need to switch. He gets the freedom to eat 70 g. or 30 g. at a meal. Whatever he eats, he eats, then we cover him w/ the Humalog.

    Linda-[NEPA]-Mom to:
    Hunter, 5 yrs, dx'd 11/14/05 type I
    Colby, 7 yrs, migraines
     
  11. Mojo's mommy

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    carb question

    I am wondering.....if you make your child a meal based on a carb count and they decide part way thru that they are done how do you know how much to give the insulin for. We are going to be making the switch hopefully next week and that is something that keeps coming to mind?
     
  12. bethdou

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    Our endo told us that as long as Meghan wasn't running high, she could start her meal, we could estimate how much she was going to eat (or if she ate quickly, let her eat it all) and then dose with Novolog on that. It's harder to dose at the start of the meal, but sometimes they just dont' want to finish all that you have given them insulin for. I can sometimes get her to drink some extra milk or juice to make up for whatever carbs she won't eat, or have her wait a little bit then eat a bit more.

    Lantus doesn't seem to peak in Meghan; we have been giving her a bedtime dose since she was dx'd and it's been working really well - at least when she gets it! (Last night we were at her grandparents' house, and I completely spaced her Lantus until I woke up at 3AM and went OH NO!! So I gave it to her then, and tonight I get to stay up a bit later and start working her dose time backwards.... :rolleyes: )

    She's only ever been on Novolog and Lantus, so I don't know how she would do with the set meals/set carbs regimen - this works for us, since it gives us more flexibility.
    :cwds:
     
  13. Jordana

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    Teri,

    If you count carbs by using carb factors, which means you'd be weighing food before the meal, then after the meal you could weigh what is left over and figure out exactly how many carbs were eaten.

    In case you haven't heard of carb factors, let me explain. Foods are made up of a percentage of carbs, from 0% to 100%. Knowing the percent of the carb makeup of the food allows you to know exactly how many carbs are being consumed, no matter if a whole portion or just part of a portion are eaten.

    Let's take a banana. A banana is made up of about 20% carbs - 20% is the same as .20. So if you weigh the banana, and it's 100 grams, then you know that 20% of that banana is carbs. To find out how many grams of carbs, using the carb factor of .20, you just multiply the weight of the banana by the carb factor, or 100 x .20 = 20 - that banana has 20 carbs in it.

    Now, let's say you give Courtney a banana. You weigh it first (let's say again it weighed 100 grams). Courtney decides half way into her snack she's full. You weigh the portion she didn't eat, let's say it was 30 grams. That means she ate 70 grams of that banana. So again you take the weight of the food she ate (70 grams) and multiply it by the carb factor of .20 to get 14 - meaning she ate exactly 14 carbs.

    I'd be happy to point you to links of carb factors that have lists and further explanations if you'd like! I have a scale that reads in grams sitting on my kitchen counter, with a calculator and carb factor list next to it, and at this point I don't know how I'd be dealing with diabetes any other way. Heck, I even have a portable scale that goes in my diabetes bag - I'm never without one!
     
  14. mom23boys

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    Teri,

    We have only been using Lantus for about three months but so far it has been great. Christian takes it at 9pm and takes Novolog for his meals. He sleeps in sometimes till 10am on weekends and the flexibility is great. Also we were told to have him take his Novolog within 15 min after meals. So we always know how much to account for. If he does not eat all I have prepared then we just recalculate and give according to what he ate. It must be challenging to give to the little ones prior to a meal cause you never know how much they are going to eat.

    Christian eats his 3 meals and sometimes a bedtime snack. So far flexibilty has been good. Hope this helps too.

    Terri

    Mom to Christian 11, dx'd 4-3-06
    Gunner 10, and Micah 5
     
  15. sammysmom

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    We were always taught to post dose (after they eat) just to make sure!!! sam was dx at 15 mo old and there was NO WAY we could ever pre dose a meal!!! yeah it messes with the 2 hour number that way, but the 3 hour # is always (most of the time) in range.....now that sam is on the pump we somtimes do the same thing, or, becasue we can, we give tiny doses all the way through the meal.....like Jordana said, we use carb factors and it has been GREAT!!! no more guessing what "a large apple" is or a "small" banana....just weigh it and know exactly what the carb amount is......we keep a list right next to our scale of food that we frequently eat, no need to look up the carb factor that way, and a calculator.....what we found out was that a good portion of the time, we were off on our carb counts with the measuring cups, not any more!!!!!
    shannon
     
  16. zimbie45

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    Hi we have always done it post meal =, becaues charlize never eats the same amount... So this makes it easy to carb out.... The way we where taught and it works great is to just count the total carbs subtract out any fiber, ( they dont effect bs) then adjust for what was eaten... example if someone has a insulin to carb ratio ( i:c) of 20 carbs to 1 unit of insulin and they eat 30 carbs.. then you take 30 carbs divide by 20 =1.5 units of insuin needed to correct for the food eaten... then you add in whats need to correct bs if need... We still do this with the pump and it also works... We really never have a problem with this.. a few times charlize will eat slower than normal, in that case by then we already know what to expect and can adjust her while she is eating... but rarly have to do this.. there is a really really really good carb book You can get it a walmart or any bookstore or amazon.com... ( ill provide a link for it).. it has every thing in it including most reseraunts... we prefer it over calorie king.. very easy to use as well... Hope this helps


    Diabetes Carbohydrate Calorie Counter, by Natow
    Other products by Simon & Schuster


    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00014UIEI/qid=1152368810/sr=8-2/ref=sr_1_2/103-4150915-1111021?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=3760901
     
  17. Mojo's mommy

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    Hi Jordana,
    That would be wonderful if you could post a link for the carb factors , I have never heard of it . It sounds very confusing but I am sure over time it gets easier???? Thanks so much!!!
     
  18. pookas

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    We also do carb counting w/ i:c ratio. Hunter gets his Humalog [same as Novalog, different company] after meals. We try to keep the meals around 20 minutes so his BS doesn't go high. If he's high b4 the meal, we use a sliding scale to correct. For instance. His i:c ratio is 1:40. His sliding scale is 1/2 u. for every 80 over 180. So if he was 205 before a meal and he ate 20 carbs, he would get 1 unit of Humalog. That is 1/2 u. to cover th meal and 1/2 u. to cover the high. It works really well. His most recent A1c was 7.7% It's really easy and your Endo. or Dietician that works w/ the Endo. should be able to teach you carb counting and set up a ratio and sliding scale for you. Good Luck!

    Linda-[NEPA]-Mom to:
    Hunter, 5 yrs, dx'd 11/14/05 type I
    Colby, 7 yrs, migraines
     
  19. zimbie45

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    Our bs correction is very similar to the i:c ratios.. what we did was

    bs minus her target range divide by ( isf ) isulin sensitivy factor

    so it would look like this
    bs 210
    target range 150
    isf is 120

    210-150 = 60 60/120 = .5 so we would then give 1/2 unit of insulin for her bs correction the add that to waht ever we need to do for her I:C ratio... so if i use the example as befor for carbs and have to correct 1.5 fot carbs eaten plus .5 for bs correction.. then we would give her 2 units of insulin...
     
  20. Jordana

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    Teri,

    The most comprehensive information is here. It's a long discussion, but most of the basics are in the first few posts. It does sound confusing when written out, as math usually does, but it really is quite simple. All you need is a scale and a calculator (and a list of carb factors, but there's a link there for a printout, and there's also a list in the appendix of Pumping Insulin). Most everyone who tries carb factors never goes back to the old way of counting carbs, because carb factors are exact - those of us with small children really need exact carb counts!
     

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