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Kindergarten (I have to do the BG checks)

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Tweety8, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Tweety8

    Tweety8 Approved members

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    Ok, I am two days away from all of this. My daughter will be in Kindergarten on Tuesday. We are all very excited about it, but here is what I was handed this summer... (btw, we are in New York state)

    1. The nurse whom we loved and was very knowledgeable about Type-1, left in June. This rocked my world, but I felt positive about the school hiring another nurse.
    2. I just heard that they hired a nurse. She was not there for orientation. I have NOT met with the nurse yet. Just the principal, who looked at the 504 Plan and told me his teachers cannot test Francesca.
    3. Isn't it NYS law that someone in her classroom needs to be able to test her?
    4. They put Francesca's seat at the back table with her classmates, but she is right by the door. This, the teacher told me, was ease for me when I have to pull her out to test her.
    5. There is only the teacher with 28 kindergarteners, NO aides whatsoever.
    6. Should I be calling a specific NYS office on Tuesday, requesting her school is allowed to get an aide to watch her?

    I am really foggy right now. I am still grieving over the loss of my mother, and now with all this, I just can't seem to organize everything, yet not even be able to depend on the school nurse. I hope when I meet her that she is WONDERFUL.

    Help!! Any advice would be great :)

    Kristin
     
  2. Amy C.

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    The school has to provide someone trained on how to treat your daughter's diabetes. Most likely, your daughter will leave the classroom to go to this person, instead of having this person to come her in the classroom.

    It doesn't have to be a nurse, but you are not required to come to school. This page has information about New York: http://www.health.state.ny.us/diseases/conditions/diabetes/children_with_diabetes.htm.
     
  3. hawkeyegirl

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    Yes, this. I assume this is a public school?

    I don't think there is any requirement that someone in her room be able to test her. We've never trained Jack's teacher how to do any D care, but we have a full-time nurse.
     
  4. Tweety8

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    thank you Amy!
     
  5. CAGrandma

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    New York is still part of the US and it is federal law that mandates that the school is responsible to provide a trained adult (nurse or non-nurse) to provide diabetes care - someone to do BG testing, count carbs, provide insulin. Since it is unsafe for a child to have to go to an office to be tested, that adult must come into her classroom, but doesn't have to stay there throughout the day if she is there when needed.
    It is illegal for the school to ask/require a parent to provide the care. Or to hint that if you don't do it, it won't get done.
    I strongly suggest that you request a 504 meeting (in writing/email) and get a 504 in place that deals with this issue, as well as with other things (like unlimited access to water and bathroom).
     
  6. selketine

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    Your child is starting kindergarten but you already have a 504 plan in place? Did you carry over a 504 plan from a public preschool?

    Most children starting kindergarten do not yet have a 504 plan in place is why I ask.

    Are you confusing the health plan with the 504 plan?

    Why would the teacher be testing your child - wouldn't the nurse do it? Why do they expect you to be there testing her?

    I suppose in a lockdown emergency situation it would be a good idea for the teacher to know what to do but that is the only reason I can think of for the teacher to learn if the nurse is usually there.
     
  7. Becky Stevens mom

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    Kristen, first of all I wanted to say how very sorry I am at the loss of your Mother:( I lost mine 30 years ago, I love and miss her every day.

    If your daughter is going into public school it is the schools responsibility to make sure that there is someone at the school at all times that know about diabetes care. This could be a nurse, health aide, secretary, teacher or other staff member. They may not like this (our school and principal do NOT) but it is all on the school to provide care. You shouldnt have to go in to test your daughter, only in extreme circumstances where there is really no one else to do it. She is much too young to be doing self care yet and they cannot force her or you to do this job.
     
  8. Flutterby

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    I assume this is a public school.. if so, they MUST have someone there at ALL TIMES that is able to test and treat your daughter. They CAN NOT MAKE you go and do it, its THEIR responsibility to find and train someone who is able to do it.

    Call the ADA right away.
     
  9. AlisonKS

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  10. coconne3

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    Sorry but did I miss something. What about the new nurse who was hired? Could you go inTuesday and meet/train her then? They are right..they can not make you go in everyday to test
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    Do you have any support to back up this statement? I've never heard that federal law requires someone to always go to the child.

    FWIW, my son always goes to the nurse, and I don't consider it unsafe in the slightest.
     
  12. CAGrandma

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    Sorry, I should have made myself clearer.
    There is no law that specifically requires any particular action, just law that requires a child's needs be met. A logical argument could be made (and may have to be made by a parent as part of the 504) that it would be unsafe for a child to have to walk by herself to an office when blood sugar is low (disorientation, lack of focus, actual collapse while alone in a hallway, etc.) the adult should go to the child. In some schools no younger kids are allowed to walk the halls alone just because of their age. This may also be part of meeting the need of a child to actually be in class, learning. Repeatedly leaving class obviously limits the amount of learning time available.
     
  13. Marcia

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    We live in NY. Are you in a public school? What does your 504 say? My daughter was rarely tested in class when in elementary school, she had a buddy walk with her to the nurse's office. Is the school asking you to do this temporarily or routinely? Ab never had the teacher check her BG in class, or when an aide was in class.(The aide was for a different student.) If this is a public school, you can't be required to care for your daughter.
     
  14. Tweety8

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    Thank you for all of this. I already has the 504 mtg, but it is obvious I need another one. Our CDE from Animas needs to be there, I will now make sure of
    that. I just found out that the Kindergarten room next door to my daughter's is an inclusion class with 2 teachers, vs the 1 teacher right now. Another set of eyes would always be a plus.

    (I only mentioned the NYS thing because I wasn't sure if there were people in my state that had this same thing happen.)
     
  15. Tweety8

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    Hi. Yes, it's a public city school. They haven't had a child with diabetes attend school there in about 5 years, from what I have gathered. And there was an entirely different staff then. I am going straight to the new nurse tomorrow after I bring Frankie to her classroom. I don't think the Principal understand at all, what needs to happen. I emailed him tonight giving him a brief example of a low and a high... What needs to be done in those situations. I'm not sure if he took the 504 Plan that I gave him seriously. I am really outspoken and need to advocate for Frankie, as we all do for our children. But I want the school to step up to the plate. I hope this new nurse has taken care of children with Type-1 before.
     
  16. Tweety8

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    Hi. Yes, with the assistance of our Endo and CDE, we created Frankie's 504 and had a meeting with the Principal about it. Isn't this what everyone does? When would the 504 be created if I didn't do it?
     
  17. Tweety8

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    Thank you so much for this, AND for the kind words about our moms :)
     
  18. Tweety8

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    Thanks again for all of your replies. It really has helped me tremendously for tomorrow. I may just make a call to the ADA, but I am hoping the nurse that "should be there", will be there. She wasn't there last week. Anyway, I've got to get all of this under control.
     
  19. selketine

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    It is rare that the school agrees to hold a 504 meeting and write one up before the child has even started school. What most schools do is hold the meeting within the first month of school starting. A "team" is called together with the child's teacher, nurse, principal, and others from inside the school. If you met with just the principal about it - that is technically not the way they should have done it.

    Many parents confuse the 504 and the health plan is why I asked. I didn't want you to think you have a 504 when you actually have a "diabetes medical management plan" or some other document.

    You can see below:

    19. How much is enough information to document that a student has a disability?

    At the elementary and secondary education level, the amount of information required is determined by the multi-disciplinary committee gathered to evaluate the student. The committee should include persons knowledgeable about the student, the meaning of the evaluation data, and the placement options. ....


    And here:

    28. Who in the evaluation process makes the ultimate decision regarding a student's eligibility for services under Section 504?

    The Section 504 regulatory provision at 34 C.F.R.104.35 (c) (3) requires that school districts ensure that the determination that a student is eligible for special education and/or related aids and services be made by a group of persons, including persons knowledgeable about the meaning of the evaluation data and knowledgeable about the placement options. If a parent disagrees with the determination, he or she may request a due process hearing.


    From OCR: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/504faq.html
     
  20. PatriciaMidwest

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    If your school hasn't signed the 504 document, you most likely have a draft of a 504, and it is not a valid legal agreement until your school signs it. Think of the 504 as a contract that requires the signature of both parties to be valid. If I write up a sales contract on my house and I sign it, it is still not valid and enforceable until the buyer also signs it.

    A health plan, on the other hand, would be created and signed by your doctor and would NOT require the signature of school officials - perhaps this is what you have.

    As far as the teacher learning to test, I don't think you can force that. The school needs to supply someone to trained in diabetes care, but it doesn't have to be the classroom teacher, and there is no requirement that I know of that says this trained person has to come to your child. There are lots of kids here that walk to the nurse's office with another student (for safety reasons).

    I may be in the minority, but personally I would not ask or expect a classroom teacher to take on the role of routine diabetes care -- too many distractions in the classroom, too many things for her to juggle and too many chances for error. I would certainly train her on how to recognize lows though.


     

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