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Juvenile Diabetes and Zyrtec or Singulair

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by clanzi314, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. SueM

    SueM Banned

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    In my opinion, the "community" (generally speaking) is "behind" looking into environmental triggers. I can go to autism websites all over the place and get links to studies involving autoimmune triggers, possible environmental concerns, links between autoimmune diseases (type 1 d included) and autism, etc. etc... Very little of that is relayed via type 1 diabetes websites, forums, etc... You rarely see it, whereas it's common knowledge in other "communities". Unless (which may very well be the case), I just haven't found the right type 1 diabetes forum or group to discuss these topics without be calling a tin foil hat wearing freak. :D
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    How do other "communities" look into environmental triggers? I guess I leave that stuff to scientists. I'm not sure how I would scientifically identify any triggers myself. Do you have any interesting scientific studies to share regarding T1 and environmental triggers?
     
  3. Becky Stevens mom

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    As a previous poster pointed out, its very normal to want to find out what is to blame when our children are diagnosed with type 1 or autism or any other chronic disease. We want to find out what is to blame and hopefully stop it so that other children dont get these diseases. I do think that its almost impossible to find the one thing that every CWD has in common. People have discussed the commonality of vaccinations or formula feeding or giving different medications when children are young. I gave my son infant tylenol, could that be a trigger? He was very gassy so I gave him Mylicon drops, could that be a trigger? Who knows? and I dont believe that we as lay people can sit here and discuss it and come to any real conclusions that will help to prevent type 1 in other children. If any researcher wants to discuss any of these things in hope of gleaning a common bond among all CWD with me I would be more than willing.

    Ive read the book "The autoimmune epidemic" with great interest. If others are interested about autoimmunity and the different research and hypothesis that there are out there then this would be a good book to read to further your research.
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

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    This website looks interesting. (I've only briefly glanced at it, so I can't vouch for its legitimacy, but the few things I read looked legit.)
     
  5. ecs1516

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    My two kids were diagnosed with type 1 at ages 3 years and 10 months. They never took it before diagnosed.
     
  6. Heather(CA)

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    Allergies are auto immune just like Diabetes, it's a coincidence.
     
  7. MrsBadshoe

    MrsBadshoe Super Moderator

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    First, I'd like to thank everyone for staying civil even with differences of opinion.

    Second, my 2 T1 kids have never taken either of these products or suffered from any type of allergies.

    Third, as far as environmental I think places like Finland where they have large pockets of T1 diagnosises; I think they are investigating possible environmental concerns. I would think unless you have clusters it would be difficult to nail down any type environmental link.
     
  8. Lizzie's Mom

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    It is my opinion that with the improvement of D management over the last few decades long-term survivability has increased and there are more T1D adults having children and increasing the gene pool of those with a genetic predisposition for T1D, increasing by default the potential for more and more T1D diagnoses.

    That's not to say that environment has nothing to do with it; I think it absolutely can, but in a trigger sense, not in a causative sense.

    Just my 2 cents.

    P.S. My CWD was our healthiest child before dx. No chronic anything requiring meds of any kind save the rare antibiotic or fever reducing med. She got the flu on Mother's Day '09 and we had a T1D dx by May 26 '09 at age 7. She was breastfed for over two years and we eat very healthy.

    I have another daughter who has been on Zyrtec for hives for over a year and a son who takes it for Spring time allergies (I also take Zyrtec for Spring time allergies). We are all D-free.

    DH's dad was a T1D dx'd at age 30.

    So for our CWD it looks like genetic predisposition (confirmed at dx) and illness as a trigger.
     
  9. meggiemoo

    meggiemoo Banned

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    REALLY??? I can't believe that Zyrtec causes diabetes? My kid never took it, but maybe took something else. The things I learn here amase me.
     
  10. Heather(CA)

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    No one said Zyrtec causes type 1:cwds:
     
  11. MamaC

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    Maybe someone with more medical knowledge than I can weigh in on this, but my understanding is that while allergies are an immune response (to an external but normally harmless irritant), they are not autoimmune (where the body attacks its own tissues)?
     
  12. MrsBadshoe

    MrsBadshoe Super Moderator

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    That is correct. In allergies, the immune system reacts to an external substance that it normally would ignore. With autoimmune disorders, the immune system reacts to normal body tissues.
     
  13. Heather(CA)

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    I's in the same family...Here's some more info.:cwds:

    It's from this article...
    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000816.htm

    Normally the immune system's army of white blood cells helps protect the body from harmful substances, called antigens. Examples of antigens include bacteria, viruses, toxins, cancer cells, and blood or tissues from another person or species. The immune system produces antibodies that destroy these harmful substances.

    But in patients with an autoimmune disorder, the immune system can't tell the difference between healthy body tissue and antigens. The result is an immune response that destroys normal body tissues. This response is a hypersensitivity reaction similar to the response in allergies.

    In allergies, the immune system reacts to an external substance that it normally would ignore. With autoimmune disorders, the immune system reacts to normal body tissues.
     
  14. hawkeyegirl

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    I'm pretty sure there's no disagreement here, LOL.
     
  15. Heather(CA)

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    I hope not but just in case I found some more info :p:D It's from this article...
    http://rue309.wordpress.com/2008/09/27/allergies-and-autoimmune-disease-an-immune-system-imbalance/


    Hyperactivity and hypersensitivity of certain facets of the immune system often result in exaggerated immune responses. Allergies and autoimmune diseases fall into this category. Each type of exaggerated immune response involves a different cascade of events.
    One event in the cascade of events of an allergy is the release of histamine by mast cells. An antihistamine inhibits the release of histamine, thus relieving the symptoms of the allergy. In the case of autoimmune disease, one event in the cascade of events is the release of proinflammatory cytokines by T-Cells. Drugs used to combat rheumatoid conditions target these T-Cells, specifically inhibiting the release of these cytokines by various mechanisms. In the case of either allergy and autoimmune disease, suppression of histamine or proinflammatory cytokines respectively, do not cure the disease. Suppression of these immune components merely suppresses the symptoms. The cure can only be found in restoring the proper function of the immune system. When the different facets of the immune system are brought back into balance, exaggerated immune responses do not generally occur.
     
  16. danismom79

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    I think the point is that allergies are not autoimmune, "just like diabetes," as was asserted earlier.
     
  17. Heather(CA)

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    I meant to say in the same family...So that one can go hand in hand with the other not one causes the other (Or the treatment) My bad, thanks for pointing that out.
     
  18. mommabear

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    That is us too.
     
  19. mommabear

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    [QUOTE ] But ultimately, I do believe in a good and sovereign God and I trust that he will work all of this according to His will.



    AMEN:):)
     
  20. deafmack

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    I think we can try and link many things to having a causation even though we are not 100% sure. I was diagnosed with diabetes way before I started Zyrtec so I know the two are mutually exclusive.
     

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