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Issue at Six Flags Atlanta

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by WendyTT, May 3, 2014.

  1. WendyTT

    WendyTT Approved members

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    I haven't posted in a long time but I am so mad and really wanted to get this out there. My daughter, type 1, 13 years old, is at Six Flags Atlanta today with her school group. She carried a small bag with her with all of her medical supplies. We had season passes to Carowinds last year and always carried the bag on the rides with us because the other option was to put it in a cubby where anyone could walk off with it after the ride is over. It was never a problem. But as she was getting on her first ride there today, they told her she couldn't carry the bag onto the ride with her--no one can carry a bag with them on the rides for safety reasons. She called me upset because they told her she would have to rent a locker. So I called Six Flags and told them the situation and they said that yes that is their policy and she could rent a locker at each ride to put it in. And she would have to pay $3.00 AT EACH AND EVERY RIDE. JUST TO HAVE HER MEDICAL BAG WITH HER SHE WOULD HAVE TO PAY THAT MUCH EXTRA. We asked to speak to a manager and was told he would tell us the same thing. They would not budge at all. We finally called First Aid and told them the situation and they first told us the same thing. My husband went off on them so they finally agreed to give her a medical sticker to put on the bag and she would be fine. So the problem got resolved but it was two hours before she got to ride her first ride because we were having to deal with this. There is no way that can be legal right? What is the policy at other amusement parks?
     
  2. Christopher

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    This story just highlights how important it is to plan ahead. Calling parks to find out their policies can save a lot of time and frustration once you arrive. I am a little surprised that after dealing with diabetes for 7 years you did not call ahead. But sorry your daughter had to deal with that.

    Did she need to bring her whole bag with her on every ride, or could she have put the bag in a locker and then just put some fast acting glucose in her pocket?

    To me it makes sense to have a safety rule that people cannot bring bags and similar items on a ride. If it gets dropped it could injure the person who has it or someone else, not to mention the bag being damaged. It could also cause the ride to malfunction, jeopardizing everyone on the ride.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2014
  3. WendyTT

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    I totally understand the safety issue of not letting bags on the ride. But to charge someone, who for medical reasons has to carry a bag with them, to store their bag at each ride is what I have a problem with. And we've been to several amusement parks over the years with diabetes and not only have we never had an issue with carrying the bag on the ride (anyone can carry a bag on a ride, we've never had to ask to make an exception for medical supplies), there has always been a cubby there where you can set your bag for free while you ride. Because it's the same at all other amusement parks, it didn't occur to me to call to inquire about their policy. I never would have dreamed there would be a charge to store your medical necessities at each ride.
     
  4. Christopher

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    I agree, it sucks to have to pay the extra money. Remember when we used to be able to check bags on an airline for free? Now there is an extra charge. And I just saw something on the news that several airlines are now going to charge people to use the overhead bins on the plane. Unfortunately, I think this whole extra charge thing is going to become more and more common place.
     
  5. misscaitp

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    Unfortunately, most Six Flags have transitioned to this system. They used to have free cubbies at each ride, but now they charge--though here it is $1 per ride or $14 for an all day locker, which is inconvenient considering the size of most amusement parks. But, I do agree that it does present a problem for those with medical conditions.

    If you ever do decide to try Six Flags again: I usually use two spibelts, threaded through my jean loops (shirt covers it). I use one for my meter, lancet, test strips, and glucotabs; the other for my phone, credit card, and ID cards. That way I still have everything I need on me, and you avoid needing to leave your bag somewhere or paying for a locker. Six flags allows you to use cargo shorts and waist packs, I know fanny packs are uncool--but Spibelts provide a nice discrete alternative.
     
  6. Megnyc

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    Sent you a PM.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2014
  7. Lakeman

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    We get the seasons pass for six flags in Il. every year and go there many many times each year. I don' know if the policies are the same at all six flags but I would certainly expect that bags could not go on rides. I also would be worried about leaving our supplies in the cubby next to each ride. As a solution we leave the main bag with insulin at the first aid stations so it can be in their fridge. Then we carry the rest of the supplies in our pockets - splitting it up between all of our pockets. It is inconvenient to go back to the first aid station and does waste a lot of time. But that is offset by the pass we get allowing us to get a time for each ride then show up at the appointed time. We still wait the same amount of time to go on a ride we just don't wait in the line. During the wait we can be treating lows, walking to the first aid station or sending someone to retrieve the bag, taking a shot, eating, or even enjoying other parts of the park like the games or arcades (you are not allowed to sign up for one coaster while simultaneously signed up for another). I want to restate that getting the pass is not cheating the system since we do wait the same amount of time as anyone else and we do spend much of the time engaged in taking care of diabetes needs. We might even spend more money at the park as a result since when one person is running back and forth to retrieve insulin the rest of the group might be dropping quarters at the arcade - a win for everyone. I think it is even a win for others in long crowded lines who are not wondering if they are going to get stuck by a needle if we were to get bumped while correcting a high.
     
  8. tom_ethansdad

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    I agree with Chris on calling ahead. We went to Six Flags Atlanta a couple of years ago and called ahead to inquire what to do with medical supply bag. They informed us to get a sticker for it when we entered the park and it wouldn't be a problem.

    I don't recall all of the details of that day but we never had anyone question the bag with the sticker on it. But we also had a large group and not everyone rode every ride so there may have been times when someone else in the group carried the bag who had decided not to ride that particular ride. I'm quite sure the bag went on at least several rides. The bag was a small backpack with straps.

    I'm sorry your experience was not a good one.
     
  9. nanhsot

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    I think the problem is that legally the bag on the ride is dangerous (well, not really, but in our lawsuit happy world, that's the reason for the policy). It's been the policy of Six Flags for a few years. Our solution is to have an adult (that's me) who doesn't like rides hold onto all bags, I refuse to pay at each ride and I'm happy just to watch anyway for most rides. He has some form of low treatment on his person and his pump on his body, so even if we get separated for a while he can manage. I realize that your situation was a school one, but I likely would have just asked one of the adult chaperones to hold onto the bag.

    When my son was on MDI and needed insulin in the bag, we stored it at first aid stations. It was kind of a hassle but I felt safer with it there than in the heat anyway.

    My son tends to stuff his pockets, so if I wasn't going with him, his solution would be a meter in one pocket and some glucose in another, his pump in a spibelt. They'd never know. He doesn't carry a "bag" though, and never has.
     

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