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Isn't it ironic

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by susanlindstrom16, Oct 29, 2015.

  1. susanlindstrom16

    susanlindstrom16 Approved members

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    Just sent a text to the school nurse to make sure my daughter finished the cupcake that she was dosed for...on the same day that the had a cavity filled! Oh, diabetes. Sometimes I just have to laugh :cwds:
     
  2. DiabetesMama

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    LOL!!! That's very funny!!! Sometimes you have to laugh or you will just sit down and cry.
     
  3. kail

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    The other day I took my girls to the dentist and my daughter started to drift low at the start of the visit so as they are asking me questions about her brushing etc, I am popping smarties into her mouth. Something I am guessing has never before been done in a dentist chair.
     
  4. Snowflake

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    That's funny! Sorry to hijack a thread, but when I was looking for a pediatric dentist for my daughter's first visit, I called around to several to find one that had experience treating T1 kids. I wanted a dentist with a sense of perspective about diabetes who wasn't going to lecture us about middle-of-the-night juices but who could help us think about how D care might impact her mouth. The one health blessing my daughter got was fantastically healthy and resilient teeth. It's my non-d son, who consumes very little sugar, that turned out to have inexplicably early cavities. Go figure.
     
  5. MEVsmom

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    My daughter had a consultation with the orthodontist last week. They just told her to brush her teeth and as soon as she came back to the waiting room, I realized her blood sugar was tanking....and made her eat a fruit strip. So much for those clean teeth.

    Our pediatric dentist is great. He's realistic that we are not going to brush her teeth after treating a low in the middle of the night. He just said try to give her a bit of water to swish around and swallow after. I'm glad he gets it.
     
  6. forHisglory

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    Went to the pediatric dentist last week with my D son and non-D daughter. The hygienist lectured me about feeding him juice and candy for lows. Told me to try "chocolate instead." I tried to educate, but it wasn't sinking in. Then the 2nd hygienist brought my 2 yo non-D back and said, "no food or water for 30 min bc of fluoride tx." Just then the dentist starts talking to me, I get distracted, and turned around to see daughter chowing down on glucose tabs from my purse. Yep, poster children for perfect dental health! Ha!
     
  7. DiabetesMama

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    We treat lows so often at night that brushing isn't possible. My dentist has never said anything to us, probably because neither of my kids have bad teeth, and it's not because they brush a lot! LOL!! They would never win an award for "good brusher of the year". They treat it like the plague! And the faces they make about the toothpaste is unreal! I just tell them to suck it up and brush because you don't want to end up like Grandpa, gluing in his dentures each day. Until they get their first cavity, I guess they won't take it seriously. I have only had one cavity my whole life and it wasn't until my late twenties. I am just grateful for small miracles.
     
  8. Ali

    Ali Approved members

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    The tooth issue is a real thing. You have to treat lows in the night and as an adult I can say when my sensor alarms I just reach over and eat some candy that is in a bowl by my bed, and never rinse with water. You just have to prioritize over time. As you get older and doing this all on your own, sleep and not going too low is critical. It is hard. Ali
     
  9. Nancy in VA

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    I was worried about this early on too, but Emma hasn't had any cavities so far. Her baby teeth have actually been well spaced to not trap the sugar between her teeth overnight. As her permanent teeth come in, we'll keep watching. Definitely rinsing with water will help.
     
  10. caspi

    caspi Approved members

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    Last year the hygienist told me that we should have my son brush if we have to treat a low in the middle of the night. Lol. I told her that's not going to happen as he's usually sleeping when I give him a juice box. He had his first cavity this year and he's 17. I'd say he's doing O.K. :wink:
     
  11. kim5798

    kim5798 Approved members

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    We are in the same boat. Dani is 17...& after 13+ years...no real issues with teeth & diabetes. We do our best, but no way is anyone brushing after treating a low in the middle of the night! We are lucky if we get her to re-test after treating the low:)

    Luckily she has not had cavities, etc.
     
  12. jenm999

    jenm999 Approved members

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    Our dentist said "of course not!" when I said we don't brush after treating a low - he gets it. He said a straw is better than a cup, rinse with water if possible, and use a fluoride rinse after brushing before bed.
     

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