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Injection Dramas

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by andiej, Feb 13, 2014.

  1. andiej

    andiej Approved members

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    Injection times are becoming a bit of a nightmare....Sometimes Jack does them and it's fine....though we are finding more and more that he shouts out in pain each time he tries to inject, and this can happen multiple times. It usually ends up with him saying he hates diabetes and he doesn't want to do it anymore which is obviously very upsetting for us all. We use the Novo Echo Pen with BD 0.5mm needles. We use novorapid and levemir insulin. He will only inject himself in his legs also. Any suggestions why sometimes they are hurting more? Or suggestions on how we can ease the pain? I've just been looking at the Buzzy which i'm tempted to order..has anyone else tried one? He is 10 years old and diagnosed 24/12/13/

    Thanks in advance.

    Andrea
     
  2. Christopher

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    What about numbing the area with an icecube prior to injecting? Is the insulin at room temp? Cold insulin can sting. What if you offer to do the injections and try his rear end?

    Never tried the Buzzy but I would say go for it, no harm in trying it out.
     
  3. Megnyc

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    I really like the BD nano needles. I think they are nearly painless.

    You can also put a spoon in the freezer and then place it on the skin for a few seconds before the injection. That should numb it up enough that your son does not feel the initial pinch of the needle entering the skin. It may also be easier for you to do the shot or for him to use syringes. I think the pens can be a bit clunky for little hands to inject smoothly.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2014
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    We never used pens but I'd been told that the weight of the pen can cause the user to wobble the needle which is uncomfortable.

    For syringes we used the inject-ease and a shot blocker. More a psychological aide perhaps, but that doesn't make it any less valuable. ;-)
     
  5. shannong

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    My son always found legs to be painful. We stopped using them when he was on injections. He liked to inject himself using his belly and his bum was the least painful for him. I think the buzzy is more for a younger child. The hospital let us use one shortly after dx when injections were very scary to him, but it really didn't help. What about pumping?
     
  6. twintype1s

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    A lot of great tips already to help on the physical side. If you're still having issues after some of those solutions, here's something that may help on the psychological side. It totally worked for a friend of mine whose 9-year-old son was getting growth hormone injections (admittedly, only once a day, not multiples). She figured, when she stubs her toe, she may let out a "Dammit," so her son could too. She told him he could curse, swear, say whatever he needed to say to help the pain. He got to say bad words with no consequences for a minute right after the injection, and it provided such a distraction that they ended up laughing and it made the whole injection process much easier on both of them. The novelty and the need for it wore off after a couple of weeks, but it got them through when he was having a really tough time with it.
     
  7. KatieSue

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    Love this idea!
     
  8. Ed2009

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    We tried some new feature in the BD needles, that is called PENTA POINT:

    We are using what it's called "BD needles, 31g x 8mm, Penta Point". This is a different shaping of the needle tip, that rather than having 3 edges, it has 5.

    The kid LOVES them. Even when you do the shot, you don't feel any resistance when going in. Sometimes the kid does not even realize he's being injected.

    Give them a try, they worked great for us. I'm not sure the PENTA PONT feature comes for all the sizes, but for the one we use, is fantastic.

    Cheers, Ed
     
  9. dpr

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    Is it as painful when you do the injections? Being so recently diagnosed maybe he's just not really ready to do it himself. Maybe try doing injections for him at home and let him do it at school. The Penta Point syringe sounds like it's worth trying. Also try and have him try some different places if you can. The stomach or back of the arms may be less painful.
     
  10. StacyMM

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    We didn't have good luck with pens and switched to syringes, which gave us the Inject-ease as an option. It's wonderful. The actual injection was smoother and faster because we didn't have to count before pulling the needle out. Alternate sites can be really scary. For my son, we rewarded him every time he tried a new place. For a bribe, he was willing to try. Each kid is different - when he needs a shot, my son always prefers legs, then arms. He hates hip shots. My daughter prefers belly, then arms and is iffy on legs.

    Does he do better with help? If you do the injection for him? Or help with the pinching? Would he prefer a pump? Has he tried syringes?
     
  11. katerinas

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    The BD penta point 4mm could help. Also what helped me is to try it on myself and see how much it hurts. I know different person different level of pain but still I think it helps with your feelings of hearing your child being in pain.
     
  12. andiej

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    Hi thank you all for your input. I don't remember him ever saying it hurt when we did it, but now he insists on doing it himself. Yes the bribing works well, though often takes a few days for him to accept the bribe to try a new place. Last night we used an ice pack...it seemed to work and I have now ordered a Buzzy so will let you know how we get on with that. We have our monthly hospital appointment with the diabetes team on Wednesday so I'm going to ask how we go about getting a pump. I know there is a pump clinic at the hospital and they have discussed pumps with us but not in detail, i think there is a waiting list but I'm not sure, though i think it's time we started to explore these other options.
     
  13. wilf

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    Let's face it - needles (and finger pokes) hurt a bit. When we were being trained after DD's diagnosis, the hospital had us do finger pokes and saline injections on ourselves. I learned through that experience that there is pain involved and the pain is real. I still try them on myself every year or so to make sure I don't forget.

    I have always acknowledged DD's expressions of pain or frustration, and we have worked hard to minimize it. For us the Accucheck adjustable Multiclix poker and BD Ultrafine II syringes have done the trick.
     

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