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ingrown toenails - constant problem

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by selketine, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. selketine

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    William keeps getting ingrown toenails on both big toes. We trim and soak, etc. but they always come back - and it seems quite painful for him. My husband tries to keep the nail trimmed back but it isn't working well - and it is painful for William. My husband is like the Sweeney Todd of podiatry I guess.:eek:

    I made an appt. with the podiatrist but anyone know what they can do for a child (he is 10) with this issue? My husband had one of his toenails partially "removed" so it can't become ingrown anymore but I'm not sure they'd do this for a child who is still growing. Considering good foot health is important for someone with diabetes - this constant return of infected toes needs to be handled some way or another - not that he is likely to have complications anytime soon with his feet.
     
  2. maciasfamily

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    How about leaving it longer rather than shorter? I personally have that issue, and let it grow longer on the sides. At first, I'd have to keep 'lifting' it every day so it wouldn't get ingrown, and once it passed the skin area it's been fine. Any time I accidentally cut it too short, I do this process over again.
     
  3. mocha

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    One of the first things I'd look in to is if his shoes are wide enough in the toe area.

    When I'm having consistent problems with my toenails starting to become ingrown, I switch over to flip flops and sandals or other shoes where my toes can wiggle and see if that helps, and it generally does.

    Wider shoes can be more expensive and definitely harder to find. New Balance tends to be better about having them available, though.
     
  4. Daniel's Mom 1993

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    Daniel was 13 when he had an infection from an ingrown toenail, which I think was the trigger for diabetes...he did have it cut out, was not a pleasant experience but you cannot tell by looking at the toe that anything was done and he actually had to have the other toe done last year so it must not have been so bad that he could stand it because he knew wha to expect, they give them a shot between the big toe and second toe and a shot on the outside of the big toe, then they cut the nail down each side - Daniel said the shots are the worst.
    Good luck...I would get it cut out because they are very painful and hard to prevent once you start getting them.
     
  5. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    DD had trouble with one of her big toes, too. We see a doctor who specializes in the feet of diabetics. He is against soaking the feet and recommends only using iodine on the problem. He did have to do a lot of cutting away one time (poor kid was screaming), but she has been fine ever since.

    When I start to get one after hiking or golfing, I find it helps to put a little bit of cotton under the nail to keep it from digging in.
     
  6. Mish

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    Soaking is only a problem for someone who has neuropathy in their feet. For regular kids with type 1 soaking an ingrown toenail in epsom salt is not a problem. At all. so says our podiatrist.
     
  7. Jordansmom

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    Cutting your toenails to far/often actually makes it worse. People who are prone to ingrown toenails have to keep them longer and cut straight across. Don't curve the cut on the corners. Seems counterintuitive and it's hard to get them grown out while they're infected.

    Both my husband and son have had the surgical procedure that stops the growth on the side of the nail and prevents ingrown toenails. It works and is so worth it. But I would wonder about still being in the growing stage too. I found a good podiatrist to be well worth an appointment.

    I also agree that well fitting and wide shoes for wide feet make a big difference as well. That seems to have been the source of most of my husband and son's problems. They both wear wide new balance shoes almost exclusively now.
     
  8. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    The Dr. we saw has checks DD for neuropathy and knows she does not have it. There are some that are of the opinion that epsom salts are not good for healing wounds as they dry out the skin and prolong healing. He also does not like the triple antibiotic ointments or my all time favourite, hydrogen-peroxide.
     
  9. mmgirls

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    I have not read the responces so ignore if you need too.

    My brother had them and the only thing that worked for him was to keep the naill long enough to push cotton under the nail at the sides to keep the nail elavated and not cutting into the skin and digging in.

    He would keep the nail straight across and fill the underside of the nail on the sides with bits of cotton. Literally pulling peices of a cotton ball off and pushing it into the corners with a toothpick. It was a process, but after awhile the nail was elavated and not digging in and he just kept up with it.
     
  10. Wendy12571

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    I know many years ago. I had the nail matrix or something destroyed so my toenails wouldn't become ingrown. I was fairly young when they did this. I actually remove them myself. The other helpful thing is outgrow.
    Wendy
     
  11. Schpoodle's Dad

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    I used to get them when I was younger. Believe it or not, what worked for me was cutting a "V" in the middle of the nails and not trimming them too short. I used a nail clipper and cut the "V" down as far as I could with it.
     
  12. deafmack

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    Epsom salts are a good source of magnesium but they do not help to draw out infections. Regular table salt does help and is much better than epsom salts. Epsom salts do have their place though.
     
  13. selketine

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    Thanks for all of the suggestions. We generally don't trim his toenails very often. Honestly his toenails have always looked really odd to me - even at birth. They looked really bent and his toenails still look bent and small - and seem to never grow. He doesn't pick at them - and they rarely seem to need trimming. His other toenails look normal.

    Guess we will see what the podiatrist recommends!
     
  14. selketine

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    The podiatrist said we can keep on trying with it or have the nail surgery and we opted for the nail surgery. William was happy to have it done and get the problem solved. It was quick and mostly painless (the shot to make the toe numb was the worst part of it I think).:cwds:
     
  15. swimmom

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    For anyone else who soaks - our doctor said to get the water as hot as she can stand it and add a little Dawn dish soap. Works great.
     
  16. LJM

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    We had to do just that as well with the big toes. Worked!
     

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