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In search of carb list for common foods kids like

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Imnanjl, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. Imnanjl

    Imnanjl Approved members

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    I'm sure there are some here, but I'm having trouble finding them. I did come across multiple lists of carb counts for Halloween, but I can't even begin to think about that right now. I'm in the mode of "take it day by day" (or in my case, hour by hour).
    If someone could tell me the best place to find a list of foods/carb counts that kids tend to like or maybe even some good snack options, that would be SO appreciated! :D
    I am hoping to put together a "quick reference" guide... I'm sure after a while it will be second nature, but right now I'm so overwhelmed I can't think straight!
    Thanks to all in advance!
     
  2. Christopher

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    This site would be a good place for you to start...

    www.calorieking.com

    There is also a Calorie King book that you could buy that you can take with you when you are out and about, if you don't have access to the Internet.
     
  3. nanhsot

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    This book has been really useful to me:

    http://www.amazon.com/Low-Carb-Bibl...4952/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317141572&sr=8-1

    It's a reference book for low carb dieting, and has nothing whatsoever to do with diabetes, but has a nice and easy section with basic food carb counts, I refer to it often. They have used copies for basically shipping costs. I have a calorie king too and use it for restaurants but for whatever reason I find this one easier to have on hand in my kitchen for quick reference for things like a plum or a cup of corn or whatever.
     
  4. cdninct

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    If nobody has mentioned it to you yet, the Calorie King book is great. It has restaurant information, packaged food information, and produce/meat/basic ingredient information, too. You can also get the information online. Check for the information on the boxes of packaged foods, too.

    If you want specific counts or categories of foods (free foods, etc.), just ask on the forum for more information.

    For now, just concentrate on the foods that your daughter eats regularly and get them in hand, then broaden out. If your child is like my fairly newly diagnosed 3 year old, there will probably be about 10 things she can live off of!

    Those 100-calorie snack packs were our salvation for the first couple of months while I was getting my bearings. There are many kid-friendly varieties (goldfish, thin Oreos, cheez-its, Chips Ahoy cookies), the info is printed right on the package (so no weighing or measuring), and they generally fall around the 15-20g range, so good for snacks!

    If she is hitting her quota of carbs too quickly but she still wants something carby and snacky, I highly recommend those Gerber Puffs. Some varieties are 12 puffs per gram of carb, so she can eat a small mountain without spiking the BG!

    Good luck!
     
  5. Imnanjl

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    Thanks so much... I'm going to be soaking up all the information I can.
    If anyone has any ideas on snack foods kids like (she's gonna get tired of apples with peanut butter and graham crackers pretty soon) I'm open to suggestions!
    Thanks again...
     
  6. Imnanjl

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    Caroline, thank you so much for the 100 cal pack suggestion... I will stock up on these for our sitter... I want to make it as easy as possible for her so she's not so overwhelmed...
     
  7. Christopher

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    What did she eat for snack before she was diagnosed? She should be able to eat the same things as before....
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2011
  8. Amy C.

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    Most kids eat fewer than 100 different food items. I would make a list of what your daughter enjoys with the food name, serving size and carb count.

    Now days, you don't need to change what you eat, but to track the food more carefully. Go ahead and add back the food she was eating before, just measure it out.
     
  9. Imnanjl

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    LOL... I'm pretty embarrassed to admit this, Christopher. She would go to the refrigerator and grab a drinkable yogurt (or two) or a poptart or a cereal bar. The bad part is, I'm a BAKER... I LOVE to bake breads and cakes and cookies and all kinds of confections. I would always have a sweet treat around. Thankfully, she's not the one with a sweet tooth... but I'm afraid my days of whipping up a batch up cookies or making a beautiful cake are over...
    I hate that she now goes to the cabinet and I don't have a supply of snacks that are friendly for her yet. I do have vanilla wafers though and she LOVES them with peanut butter.
     
  10. Christopher

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    Absolutely not! There is no reason why you can't continue to bake for her. You just need to be conscious of the carbs and get yourself a good scale (Salter1450). Don't let diabetes stop you or your daughter from doing the things you like to do. Danielle loves baking and making cakes in particular, with all sorts of wild designs and toppings (thanks Cake Boss!) ;)

    She figures out the carbs the best she can and sometimes it works out and sometimes it doesn't and she may go a little high. The bottom line is she gets to enjoy baking (and eating) the cake.

    So why can't she still grab a Gogurt or two? Or a cereal bar? Just figure out the carbs and give her insulin to cover it.

    I know it seems overwhelming now, but as time goes on you will get more comfortable dealing with the day to day things you need to in order to live with this illness.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2011
  11. nanhsot

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    I struggled SO SO much at first with the concept of baking, it just overwhelmed and intimidated me and I absolutely LOVE to bake. I bake breads, cookies, cakes, you name it, I love it to do it for my family and for others.

    I can confidently state that while there is a transition period while you figure these things out, baking will definitely be part of you and your daughter's lives.

    My son actually makes fun of me (he's 17, 15 at diagnosis). I'll do this laborious carb count when I bake something new....weigh the flour, find out how much the whole recipe is, then divide by # of servings. And I kid you not, 9 times out of 10 that kid will GUESS what it is and be within a carb or two! So while I don't recommend this for a newly diagnosed child, here's where I admit that I often bake now and just let him swag it (that stands for silly wild a$$ guess), and it works out just fine. You are not there yet, please understand that these early days it is necessary to learn and be precise, but I do want to reassure you that the day will come, sooner than you realize (I'm only a year and a half into this journey), where baking will no longer frighten or overwhelm you.

    A scale is a nice addition when you are ready to learn about that let us know. I have a general idea for most of my homebaked breads and we do a lot of weighing to be more precise.
     
  12. cdninct

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    I agree with the last two posters--you will be able to bake away! I was just getting into baking, particularly breads, when my son was diagnosed. We were on a limited carb plan at first, so I shelved the baking, but now that the weather is getting cooler (in theory, at least!) and his carb intake is no longer scheduled, I'm ready and excited to return to it. You'll just have to learn to work out how many carbs are in the whole recipe and how many servings you get out of it. It's a pain, but totally worth it!
     
  13. slpmom2

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    Hi, and welcome to the board. You've gotten some good advice here, and I'll second those who have said that you will be able to bake for her again. I know it's totally overwhelming at this point, but you should know that the clouds will eventually clear and you'll get this all figured out. I know when my daughter was first diagnosed I went to almost all pre-packaged foods with carb counts on the package, and then gradually started branching out as I got more confident in figuring carbs on my own.

    As for carb-counting resources, I LOVE my iPod app, Nutrition Menu. It's got restaurants, common foods, etc., it's very easy to use, and it's always with me so I don't have to worry about having the Calorie King book nearby (though we do have them stashed in both cars and several in the kitchen!). So if you have an iPod Touch or an iPhone, it's worth looking into.

    I'd also recommend getting a digital kitchen scale and learning about Carb Factors, when you're ready to learn something new. It's a method of allowing you to calculate the carbs in any size serving of a food by knowing what % of the food's weight is carbs. Here's a thread with a description (again... for when you're ready):

    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=52851&highlight=calculate+carb+factor

    When I cook or bake from a recipe, I figure out the carb factor for the recipe and then just write it on the page so I've got it for the next time.

    Hang in there, and good luck!
     
  14. tbcarrick

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    My nutritionist gave us a "cheat sheet".It's involves weighing things for accuracy.It is a great tool..I can share if you want..Some of the things are like..for baked goods(after baking)/15 grams carbs for every ounce.So if you have a 2 oz.piece of cake its 30 grams.or for a mixed dish like tuna casserole or lasagna/5 grams of carbs for every 1oz..so if you have 5oz it would be 25 grams of carbs.This is MY LIFE SAVER!! LOL very accurate to counts because I've checked..Good luck :)
     
  15. MomofSweetOne

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    The Calorie King book is usually included the JDRF Bag of Hope for newly diagnosed families. Were you given one at diagnosis? If not, give JDRF a call and they will ship one to you. The teddy bear, Rufus, really helped my daughter adjust. He still comes out when diabetes frightens her. I think for the first 9 months he literally went everywhere with us in her backpack.
     
  16. MamaBear

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    This site is wonderful for everything from bananas, to baked potatoes, to cake. She can still have all the same foods as before. You just have to count the carbs, and give the proper amount of insulin. If you search calorieking for a specific food you can use the drop down feature for oz.,cups,grams,etc.. depending on how you weigh and measure her food. Get a food scale, you will need it!

    And You can still bake like you always have. You can either search for an item on Calorieking site that you think is comparable. Or you can enter your own recipes into this recipe calculator. It will generate a nutrition label which you can print up and keep with your recipes. http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-calculator.asp
     
  17. manda81

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    I agree with Christopher. This disease has taken what we thought our lives were going to be like, how we spend our time, our sleep, our fears...Don't let diabetes take anything else from you.

    We stuck with our normal foods, and gave insulin accordingly. For us, in the beginning, the "free" snacks and small snacks (under 15g carbs) were more difficult to come up with.

    For zero carb snacks, we did boiled eggs, bacon, pickles, cheese, lunch meats (rolled up with a piece of cheese or around a cheese stick).

    For small snacks less than 15 carbs, we did the 100cal snack packs, small bags of chips, fruit roll ups, milk, yogurt, apples, bananas, grapes, veggies with ranch, cheese toast, and chicken salad. I can't remember exactly the carbs, but I think a lot of the lunch-box packaged snacks (like cookies, animal crackers, pb/cheese crackers, etc) were under 15 as well, and great for when you are running out the door, or for a sitter.

    I bake a lot, as well, and have learned to just keep a sheet on the fridge that's my go to reference for how many carbs are in a cup of flour, sugar, etc... so when I bake, I can quick reference that and add up the carbs while the goodies are in the oven. Having anything that is a quick reference has been a life saver.
     
  18. Imnanjl

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    It would be SO appreciated if you could pass along your "cheat sheat." I have a kitchen scale from my own "Weight Watcher" days and have been weighing everything since we got home.

    I know someone mentioned she can still have her same snacks as before just dose her with insulin afterward, but we are being instructed now to limit her snacks to 15 grams and not to dose between meals. I know down the road after this will change (thankfully) but in the meantime we are to avoid it. I think I have gathered some great snack ideas for our own home and our sitters... vanilla wafers with peanut butter and sugar free pudding are her current favorites...

    Again, THANKS SO MUCH TO YOU ALL!! I have a feeling I'm going to be spending a lot of time here in the future!!!:D
     
  19. Christopher

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    I am not sure about the scale you have but the one I mentioned, the Salter 1450, is great because it will tell you how many carbs are in whatever you put on the scale. So if you put an apple on the scale, and type in Apple, it will tell you how many carbs are in that specific apple. It has a database of over 1,400 different food items.

    As for the snacks, I would ask why they want you to limit snacks to only 15 carbs, what is the purpose in that? Also, when you say "not dose between meals" do you mean not do a correction between meals?
     
  20. virgo39

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    I'm not the OP, but when we started on MDI, it was basically 4 shots a day --Novolog at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Lantus at night, with two uncovered 15 g. snacks (afternoon and night). We did know that we could give more insulin for a larger snack or more food, etc., but seldom did so at first. We ditched the bedtime snack and started correcting at night before we did much with the afternoon snack and then we started pumping so it wasn't really an issue.
     

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