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If they can't cure it are you OK with it?

Discussion in 'Research' started by carbz, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    My sole mission is to see type 1 diabetes cured and prevented. I will endlessly attempt to raise awareness,funds, and the need to fund the research. I also heartily embrace research for the restoration of euglycemia that doesn't require excessive amounts of consumables or toxic systemic immunosuppression. Our family will continue to assist our child to have the best technology available until something better comes along.
     
  2. jade

    jade Approved members

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    I don't think we'll ever have a full on cure. But with current research it seems plausible to stop the autoimmune attack and maybe generate/save some insulin producing cells. The best case scenario I can think of would be T1 diabetics living without insulin but only if they manage their D rigorously with diet and exercise.
    Something like Smart insulin would be such a panacea in the meantime! I would almost consider it as good as a complete cure! The concept itself gives me hope. If the big Pharma in the US ignores it, I'm certain R&D of a similar drug will be picked up by another foreign country.
     
  3. carbz

    carbz Banned

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    One of the biggest problems I see with any kind of curative treatment will be the cost to produce it. Many people with diabetes like myself don't have insurance because they either can't get it because of the diabetes or they can't afford it. Sure we can all sit back and say well I'd put it on my credit card. If we are talking a lifetime of periodic treatments in the hundreds of thousands of dollars range it won't be realistic for hardly anyone. If you'd be fortunate to have Insurance when if and when a better treatment was available that could be ongoing every few months or years at say $20K to $30K a pop would it be covered? What happens to the people who have no insurance and or can't afford it? Do they continue to suffer? If the new and improved treatment was cheap to produce and offer would they approve it knowing it would destroy the diabetes cash cow? Getting a treatment to work is clearly the first step but getting it approved and to "ALL" the suffering people may be just as much of as a dilemma as finding something that actually works.
     
  4. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    carbz, how many people worldwide do you think will be able to afford the "artificial pancreas" with all of its consumables?
     
  5. carbz

    carbz Banned

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    To be honest if Insurance doesn't cover it not many. My guess is if and when its ready It will run in the $30k to $40k range. Personally I don't believe it will ever do what our pancreas does anyway. Even if its an improvement over what we have now to me its not an acceptable advance. Many young kids today have pumps and are ok with it. When I was diagnosed there was no pump and diabetes meds and supplies were cheap otherwise it would have been a big hardship for my folks. Personally living with some contraption hooked up to me 24/7 is not appealing in the least bit. If the AP pancreas came out tomorrow I wouldn't be in the least bit excited. Outside of a true cure something like Smart Insulin if it truly works as effectively as a pancreas and eliminates testing for the most part would be welcomed advancement. Id still much prefer it gone altogether but I just have doubts whether that is realistic at least in the next decade. Just thinking about living with this another ten years even if they can cure it by then sickens me. My whole entire life has been nothing but a blur of sugar swings, anxiety, depression.....etc. Living an entire life depressed from a chronic condition is a nightmare no one should endure. Everyone else is living life and I'm doing nothing but chasing blood glucose levels 24/7.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2011
  6. Kaylas mom

    Kaylas mom Approved members

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    I don't think my kids have ever been told, you will see a cure. They know that we hope and pray for one and support the causes.
     
  7. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    I have hope for new therapies

    Camillo Ricordi from the DRI (www.diabetesresearch.org http://www.diabetesresearch.org/page.aspx?pid=1238 ) on the upcoming transplantation congress

    http://www.tts.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=752&Itemid=571

    Camillo Ricordi

    The past decade has witness more information emerging from the biomedical fields than the preceding 3000 year. However, global health is threatened by an exponential growth of degenerative disease conditions with only modest increase in longevity, but not disease-free lifespan. Old models of academic and corporate translational research are increasingly less effective and inadequate to address escalating health care costs worldwide.

    In this direction, improving longevity in disease-free conditions will require the development of novel, clinically applicable strategies for the replacement, repair and regeneration of failing or injured tissues and organs.

    Cellular therapies, stem cells, and regenerative medicine strategies (Cell Transplant Society - CTS), together with the potential for utilization of animal derived cells, tissues and organs (International Xenotransplantation Association ? IXA) are emerging in what could become the next technological revolution, after software, communications and renewable energy.

    The 2011 Joint Meeting will bring together world leaders in xenotransplantation (IXA) and in cellular therapies, tissue engineering, biomaterials, nanotechnologies, stem cells and regenerative medicine (CTS) to catalyze an unprecedented level of scientific and translational exchange in these complementary fields of science and technology. The joint meeting will also represent an opportunity to bring together world leading scientists and business leaders to catalyze unprecedented collaborative efforts, from basic science to applied research and delivery of novel therapeutic solutions to humankind.

    I am particularly honored to serve as Chair of the 2011 CTS-IXA Joint Congress which will also mark the 20th Anniversary of the Cell Transplant Society. I am confident that this will represent another memorable event in Miami and another outstanding opportunity to learn, share and synergize efforts.

    Camillo Ricordi, MD
    Founding President
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2011
  8. jade

    jade Approved members

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    Is Diabetes a cash cow throughout the world? In many parts of the world the Insulin used is generic and I think countries with subsidised healthcare would welcome therapies (such as smart insulin for T1 and T2 diabetics) aimed at reducing complications and cutting down costs for test strips etc.

    Also, many of the therapies aimed at stopping the autoimmune attack are already being used for other conditions. I suspect they didn't get to phase 2 or 3 trials without addressing production cost issues.
     
  9. Jacob'sDad

    Jacob'sDad Approved members

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    There's going to be great advances. CGMs are going to be dead accurate. Insulin will get better. Maybe there will be a cure, maybe there won't but I don't really buy into the idea that a cheap cure won't come because the "cash cow" would be lost. It's a zero sum gain. Take test strips for example:

    Let's say a test strip costs a buck. So the buck leaves my hand and goes into someone elses hand and the test strip, a disposal item, is consumed. The buck still exists but the test strip does not.

    Let's say test strips aren't needed anymore. The buck still exists and the test strip does not. Same as before. The only difference is the buck is now in MY hand and not someone elses. But it's still a zero sum gain because test strips and other diabetes supplies are disposable items.

    Actually, there is a gain because in the latter example the test strips aren't ending up in a landfill.
     
  10. Teenwithdiabetestype1

    Teenwithdiabetestype1 Approved members

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    Difficult question.

    No.
    Im a teenager who was diagnosed twelve years ago. I also have a sibling with diabetes who was diagnosed three years ago. The nurses at endo told me when i was diagnosed that a cure would be found in three years. after three years they said it would be five years. and so on and so on. I am already starting to see some of the long term affects of diabetes (kidney problems, circulation issues). I know that diabetes will probably be responsible for my death, but for my little brother it doesn't have to be that way. NO ONE should ever stop fightng for the cure. ever. It will never be ok.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2011
  11. StillMamamia

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    No, I'm not ok with it, and never will be. That said, it is what it is. It sucks, but life's too short to be wasted wallowing. IMHO

    I hope a cure will be found someday.
     
  12. Pavlos

    Pavlos Approved members

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    I'm also not OK with it.

    Any thoughts on a cure would be purely speculative, so I'd rather speculate on the optimistic side :)
     
  13. DadCares

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    I will not be OK with it if there is not a cure. I believe a cure is achievable. Even if others lose hope, I hope and pray that I remain resilient to encourage any of you who loses hope.

    I believe a cure will almost certainly involve some sort of ongoing therapy such as a daily pill or maybe an occasional injection. I don't think diabetes will totally go away where you take one treatment and never have to have a follow-up treatment for the rest of your life.

    I don't believe any researcher has the complete cure in her/his laboratory. But I suspect several of them have pieces of the cure right now. I believe a cure will have 3 or 4 therapies... possibly combined, possibly separate: (1) stop the autoimmune attack, or intercept the autoimmune attack so that the attack fails - I believe this is the prerequisite to other solutions succeeding; (2) reduce the inflammation that puts the body in a vulnerable state and possibly further contributes to the autoimmune attack; (3) produce new insulin... I believe beta cell regeneration is the higher odds solution, but perhaps it will be an external source of islets or stem cells.

    A cure has turned out to be more complex than people realized. No, it didn't happen in 3 years or 5 years. But a cure is still achievable!
     
  14. Mimi

    Mimi Approved members

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    Am I ok with it? No.

    Do I think there will be a cure (meaning my dd is living the same as anyone without d) in my lifetime? No.

    Do I hope and pray for a cure? Absolutely!

    But, we have to keep living our lives as they are now. I'm giving my dd the best possible life she can have now just as I do with all my children. D doesn't factor in to that at all. It's just there. :cwds:
     
  15. millyyates

    millyyates Approved members

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    I think.

    Who am I to say?

    I think my daughter's pancreas has been damaged and scared and full function will not return if any. I think maybe if the immune attack is stopped then maybe for some some insulin production will return. The earlier this is done in the damage process the more pancreatic function may be retained.

    I think the future lies in starting to reduce the incidence. Stopping the damage starting. Reducing the number of new diagnoses. Current research along these lines that is now being followed up in larger trials includes:

    -hydrogolysed infant formula
    -Vitamin D
    -Omega 3

    I believe that the causes are multifaceted and therefore so will the methods of prevention have to be.

    Reducing inflamation and protecting the eyelets.

    Other research could look at the area of environmental toxins and entoviruses.

    Hopefully the current trial of the anti-inflamatory protein AAT is successful or sets us on the right path.

    For my daughter where the damage is done I hope for seaweed covered islets or stem cell or transplants to replace the ones that died in her body.
     

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